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HP Nylon Plastic Material Information

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Information
This is a Maker Material - Only available to the model owner. Keep in mind that we may adjust the guidelines and pricing as we learn more about this material.
Finishes
Black Nylon 11 Gray
Black Nylon 11 Black
Price $5.00/part
$0.56/material cm3
$0.42/machine cm3
Ships in
See current status
6 business days for products smaller than 150 mm on any axis
10 business days for products between 150 mm and 200 mm on any axis
12 business days for products larger than 200 mm on any axis

About HP Nylon Plastic

HP Nylon Plastic is Nylon 12 (PA12) printed on the new HP Jet Fusion 3D 4200 printer. HP's Multi Jet Fusion technology is a new printing process which uses agents and lamps to selectively fuse models in a powder bed. The multi-agent process fuses each layer together producing parts with a tensile strength in the z-axis which is comparable to the strength in the x-y plane.

This nylon material has excellent mechanical properties, with strength and density exceeding that of parts produced on other powder bed printing technologies. The strength makes it an excellent choice for functional parts, such as drone parts, RC cars, mechanical fixtures, camera mounts and phone cases. The surface is smooth, finished and semi-glossy, also making it a great material for jewelry, home decor, toys and games. HP Nylon Plastic can be thought of as a general use plastic that has a wide range of applications.

Material Info

Look and feel

HP Nylon Plastic is a Nylon 12 material 3D printed by fusing nylon powder together using black agents and heating lamps. The Gray finish is a heathered gray and the natural color out of the printer, while the Black finish is dyed. The material has high strength and density, which make it ideal for functional parts, such as RC cars and mechanical fixtures. The surface is smooth and semi-glossy, also making it an excellent choice for plastic jewelry and decorative items.

Rougher Surfaces

Sometimes, you may have one surface that is rougher than the other surfaces. This is characteristic of the Multi-Jet Fusion technology and is dependent on your model’s geometry as well as how it was oriented during printing. Generally, the top surface will be roughest and the bottom surface will be smoothest. Our production planners do their best to orient to optimize for quality and dimensional accuracy depending on the application of your product.

Sharp Edges

Edges and corners may be sharp and slightly raised from the surface by about 0.1 to 0.2 mm. If your model has many faces with edges and/or corners, the corners of one side may show more of this effect due to how it was oriented during printing. We do our best to orient to minimize this effect. Adding a fillet with a radius of 3 mm or more will reduce this effect of raised edges.

Color

HP Nylon Plastic material has a black core, which can be seen when a model is broken or scratched. Raw Gray displays a light grey colour which, can vary in uniformity and shade. This can make models look slightly uneven and may vary between similar models. If a model's flat surface is orientated upwards, it can be subject to a significantly darker batch of grey in the center.

Cavities

Occasionally, products may have small cavities, creating an uneven, pitted surface. We do our best to orient models to minimize this phenomenon, but on certain model geometries, it is unavoidable. This porosity can compromise the strength of the product, leading to more brittle parts.

Cavities are most prevalent in thin wires and on the edges of flat surfaces. To reduce the risk of cavities, we recommend making round wires at least 3 mm thick. Additionally, cavities are less likely on square beams than on round wires. If you are able to design wires as beams, these will be less likely to exhibit cavities. We recommend 2 mm thick square beams.

Stepping

Depending on the geometry of your model and the orientation in which it is printed, you may see print lines or a “stepping” phenomena on your product. Stepping is a is a natural artifact of 3D printing. 3D printing works by printing layer by layer, and while our layers are around 0.08mm thin, there is a "step" between each layer, much like a staircase. Stepping visibility alters between top and bottom surface. On the top it is more detectable, when on the bottom is almost nonexistent. Certain areas of your model may show this effect more than others, particularly on curved areas. This is also more obvious in smaller items such as model trains or items with gentle curves such as spheres. We make every effort to minimize the print lines in your model, but they are part of the process and cannot be completely eliminated.

How it's 3D printed

HP Nylon Plastic is printed using HP's Multi Jet Fusion Technology.

HP developed its Multi Jet Fusion technology leveraging its extensive knowledge and expertise from more than 30 years of leadership in the ink jet printing industry. In HP’s Jet Fusion 3D printing solutions, a uniform layer of powder is deposited on the build platform. Then the powder is heated uniformly to just below sintering temperature using heating lamps above the powder. Next, a set of inkjet heads pass across the powder while depositing fusing and detailing agents where parts will be built in a single, continuous pass. The ink deposits a 2D image of each layer or cross-sectional area of the models. Simultaneously, fusing lamps pass across the powder bed as ink is being deposited. The agents and the energy from the fusing lamps cause the powder to selectively fuse together. The agents and the closed loop thermal control system dictate where and how much energy the powder absorbs so it reaches a perfect fusing temperature in the areas where models are being built. The fusing agent controls where powder will be fused together while the detailing agent is applied to modify fusing and create fine detail and smooth surfaces. Next, the build plate moves down, a new layer of powder is deposited and this process is repeated layer by layer until the parts are fully built.

Similar technologies fuse powder together point by point. But with HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology, each layer of powder is fused together in a single continuous pass whose time is independent of the density of parts on your build.

After printing, the powder is cooled before handling. Then the build chamber is transferred to a post-processing station. Parts are extracted from the powder while using a vacuum system which collects loose powder. The loose powder which is collected is recycled and re-used for future builds. Excess powder on the parts is removed using air and media blasting guns until they are clean.

Technical documents

Similar Plastics

Lead Time

Applications

Layer Thickness

Technology

HP Nylon Plastic

6–12 days

Fixtures
RC Car Chassis
Mechanical parts

0.08mm

Multi Jet Fusion

Strong & Flexible

4–10 days

Phone Cases
Prototypes
RC Car Chassis

0.12mm

Selective Laser Sintering (SLS)

View Material

Frosted Detail Plastic

3–6 days

Scale Models
Miniatures
Prototypes

0.029mm / 0.016

Material Jetting

View Material

High Definition Acrylate

5 days

Miniatures
Wargaming
Figurines

0.05mm

Direct Light Projection (DLP)

View Material

PLA

2–4 days

Cosplay & Props
Fixtures
Prototypes

0.2mm

Filament Deposition Modeling (FDM)

View Material

Design Guidelines for HP Nylon Plastic

The rules to follow in order to create successful products in HP Nylon Plastic. Read more on model checks

Rules

Max bounding box 284 × 380 × 380 mm 210 × 210 × 360 mm

For us to be able to make a product, each of its pieces must fit within these dimensions.

For HP Nylon Plastic, the maximum bounding box is determined by the size of the printer we use to create your product. To ensure the successful creation of your product, make sure the bounding box fits within our maximum limit. If it does not, you can try scaling it down, removing unnecessary features to reduce the bounding box, or consider another material with a bigger maximum bounding box.

Min bounding box X + Y + Z > 7.5 mm

For us to be able to make a product, each of its pieces must be bigger than these dimensions.

For HP Nylon Plastic, the minimum bounding box is determined by our ability to successfully print very tiny products.

To ensure the successful creation of your product, make sure the bounding box of your model is larger than our minimum. If it is not, you can try scaling it up, thickening, combining, or enlarging parts and features, or trying a material with a smaller minimum bounding box.

Recommendations

Min Supported Wall Thickness Minimum 0.4 mm thick

For HP Nylon Plastic, the minimum thickness is determined by our ability to successfully clean your product once it has been removed from the printer. Features that are too thin often break when the product is removed from the powder bed, or when excess dust is removed from the product. To ensure the successful creation of your product, make sure the features are thicker than the minimum requirement. If they are not, try making them thicker, or consider a material with a smaller minimum thickness requirement.

Design tips

Prevent walls from warping on larger models

Large models with thin walls may warp depending on the geometry of the part. The material is sintered at a high temperature, and then it cools down to room temperature making it shrink. This shrinkage can create stress inside the material that may cause warping. Some geometries (e.g. large flat parts, open boxes) are more sensitive to warping than others. Making your design more stiff (increasing torsional rigidity) will reduce the risk of warping. Longer walls need to be thicker than short ones.

Min unsupported wall thickness 0.5 mm thick

An unsupported wall is one connected to other walls on less than two sides.

For HP Nylon Plastic, the minimum unsupported wall is determined by our ability to successfully clean your product once it has been removed from the printer. Walls that are too thin often break when the product is removed from the powder bed, or when excess dust is removed from the product. To ensure the successful creation of your product, make sure unsupported walls are thicker than the minimum requirement. If they are not, try making them thicker, adding supports, or considering a material with a thinner minimum unsupported wall requirement.

Design tips

Avoid too thin spikes

If your design is intended to taper to a zero point the edge is going to be under the guidelines. If the width of the spike is bigger than the length, the spike will likely be printable. If the spike is longer than the width, the point will probably break in the cleaning process. In order to avoid the rejection of the model, a filleted edge can be added. Another option is to order it as a PITA.

Min supported wires 0.8 mm thick

A wire is a feature whose length is greater than five times its width. A supported wire is connected to walls on both sides.

For HP Nylon Plastic, the minimum supported wire is determined by our ability to successfully clean your product once it has been removed from the printer. Wires that are too thin often break when the product is removed from the powder bed, or when excess dust is removed from the product. To ensure the successful creation of your product, make sure supported wires are thicker than the minimum requirement. If they are not, try making them thicker, or consider a material with a thinner minimum supported wire requirement.

Design tips

Thicker models are more difficult to bend

Flexibility depends on the structure and design of the model. The thicker you make something, the less flexible it will be. A spring made with 1mm wire will compress and elongate rather easily. A spring made with 3mm thick will take a bit more effort, and won’t compress if you drop it from a few feet.

Sprues

Sprues are wires that keep two models together. They have to be at least 2 mm thick and attached in at least two places on each model.

Sprues are more likely to break than other wires because they typically connect parts with high mass on either side. For this reason, they need to be thicker than our minimum wire thickness. They present some unique challenges at quality checking for our manufacturing teams. For particulary complex geometries, it becomes difficult to ensure your sprued structure is completely intact with all of its parts before we ship.

Min unsupported wires 0.9 mm thick

A wire is a feature whose length is greater than five times its width. An unsupported wire is connected to walls on less than two sides.

For HP Nylon Plastic, the minimum unsupported wire is determined by our ability to successfully clean your product once it has been removed from the printer. Wires that are too thin often break when the product is removed from the powder bed, or when excess dust is removed from the product. To ensure the successful creation of your product, make sure unsupported wires are thicker than the minimum requirement. If they are not, try making them thicker, adding supports, or considering a material with a thinner minimum unsupported wire requirement.

Design tips

Thicker models are more difficult to bend

Flexibility depends on the structure and design of the model. The thicker you make something, the less flexible it will be. A spring made with 1mm wire will compress and elongate rather easily. A spring made with 3mm thick will take a bit more effort, and won’t compress if you drop it from a few feet.

Avoid too thin spikes

If your design is intended to taper to a zero point the edge is going to be under the guidelines. If the width of the spike is bigger than the length, the spike will likely be printable. If the spike is longer than the width, the point will probably break in the cleaning process. In order to avoid the rejection of the model, a filleted edge can be added. Another option is to order it as a PITA.

Min embossed detail 0.2 mm for details
0.4 mm for readable text

A detail is a feature whose length is less than twice its width.

The minimum detail is determined by the printer's resolution. When detail dimensions are below the minimum, the printer may not be able to accurately replicate them. Details that are too small can also be smoothed over in the polishing process. To ensure details come out clearly, make them larger than the indicated minimum. We may refrain from printing products with details smaller than the minimum, since the final product will not be true to your design. If your product has details smaller than the minimum, try making them larger, removing them, or considering a material with finer detail.

Design tips

Thicker models are more difficult to bend

Flexibility depends on the structure and design of the model. The thicker you make something, the less flexible it will be.

Min engraved detail 0.2 mm high & wide
0.4 mm for readable text

A detail is a feature whose length is less than twice its width. Engraved or debossed details go into a surface.

The minimum detail is determined by the printer's resolution. When detail dimensions are below the minimum, the printer may not be able to accurately replicate them. To ensure details come out clearly, make them larger than the indicated minimum. We may refrain from printing products with details smaller than the minimum, since the final product will not be true to your design. If your product has details smaller than the minimum, try making them larger, removing them, or considering a material with finer detail.

Design tips

Thicken your engraved/embossed text to make it easier to read

Although 0.2mm details will show up in this material, we find that text raised at least 0.5mm shows up most clearly. If you want crisper text or embossed details, try bumping the thickness up to 0.5mm.

Min escape holes 4.0 mm diameter for one escape hole


2.0 mm diameter when there are two or more escape holes
Required for products bigger than 50 x 50 x 50 mm.

Escape holes allow unbuilt material inside hollow products to be removed.

When products contain hollow cavities, they are often filled with powder even after they are removed from the build tray. If escape holes are not large enough, or the geometry of the product makes it difficult to shake or blast the powder out, we cannot successfully clean it. This is especially important for our water-based dyeing process as models cannot be successfully dyed if they cannot be successfully cleaned inside and out.

To ensure a successful, cleanable product, make sure to include sufficiently large escape holes for each hollow cavity in your product. Multiple escape holes are recommended for large hollow parts. A single escape hole at the end of a cavity will not allow material in the corners near the escape hole to fully escape; so, multiple escape holes at both ends of the cavity are recommended. If your escape holes are insufficient, try enlarging them, adding more, or filling in the hollow space.

A single escape hole at the end of a cavity will not allow material in the corners near the escape hole to fully escape. So we recommend multiple escape holes at both ends of the cavity.

Clearance 0.6 mm clearance

Clearance is the space between any two parts, walls or wires.

HP Nylon Plastic is printed by fusing nylon powder together. When there is a very small gap between features or parts, partially fused powder can get stuck in between. This can prevent mechanical parts from moving, or fill in intended gaps between features.

To ensure a successful product, make the clearance between parts, walls, and wires greater than the indicated minimum. If your clearance is too small, try making the gap bigger, or consider fusing the parts or features if their independence is unnecessary. You can also try a material with a smaller minimum clearance.

Interlocking and enclosed parts?

Yes.
HP Nylon Plastic is printed by fusing nylon powder together. This enables interlocking parts, as long as the distance between them is greater than the indicated minimum.

Multiple parts per model file? Yes. Up to 250 parts.
Accuracy ±0.25 mm for features under 100mm. For features above 100mm, an additional 0.1% of the length.

More On Designing for HP Nylon Plastic

Material Traits
Thicker models are more difficult to bend

Flexibility depends on the structure and design of the model. The thicker you make something, the less flexible it will be.

Print lines or "Stepping"

Depending on the shape of your model and orientation in the print tray, you might see print lines, or “stepping” phenomena on your model, which is a natural artifact of 3D printing. 3D printing works by printing layer by layer, and while our layers are around 0.08mm thin, there is a "step" between each layer, much like a staircase.

Thin Walls and Wires

Walls and wires close to or slightly above the guidelines may still be rejected based on the geometry. For example, extra long wires or walls protruding from an object may be damaged during cleaning. Our production team will communicate with you if the design is too weak with tips on how to strengthen it.

Holes and Small Tubes

We have specialized tools to clean out holes and small tubes. However, these tools do have their limitations. We do our best to clean your models fully but avoid drilling or picking at small holes that may change the geometry of your model. Due to the characteristics of this material and the current limitations for our tooling, we cannot clean holes that are smaller than 0.8 mm and deeper than 5.0 mm. Additionally, tubes with corners can be difficult to reach past and we may not be able to fully clean your model.

We recommend creating multiple access points to holes and small tubes so that we can properly clean your model.

More on Escape Holes and Interior Cavities

We are unable to reach interior tubes and pockets that are not line of sight to the opening. For example, if an airplane model has an escape hole in the tail, we are able to clean the area up to the nose of the plane, but not able to clean the support material in the wings. In order for us to clean your model completely, please add escape holes of 2mm to any corner or side opposite to the area where support removal is needed. We will always do our best to fully clean each part.

Sprues

Sprued parts are likely to break in our process causing production delays and potentially preventing your product from moving out of First to Try. We use high pressure blasting to clean your models and weak geometry will break in the process. To ensure printability, use 2.0 mm thick wires, solid connections and attach every part in at least two places. If your model is rejected for thin wire sprues, you still may order your model as PITA if you do not care if the sprues break in the process. However, please read all the guidelines around PITA before ordering.

Orientation

Our production team orients your models with the greatest care to provide the highest quality end product. We neither guarantee orientation for your models nor offer user set orientation currently. Our production team does their best to evaluate your product and orient it to optimize either dimensionally accuracy or aesthetics depending on the application.

When orienting to optimize dimensional accuracy, the mating surface and other important features like holes are oriented facing down to provide the highest level of accuracy possible.

For products where the look is more important, we orient details and other important features face down.

Details

Details like small text and patterns show up best in Black. Gray parts have the same level of detail but the coloring of the parts hides the detail from your eyes.


Disclaimer:
Please note that the 3D printed products are intended for decorative purposes. They are not suited to be used as toys or to be given to underage children. The products should not come into contact with electricity and be kept away from heat. Our materials, except for Porcelain, are not food safe.
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