National Gallery of Denmark Collection Jewelry Design Contest

Create jewelry based on the collection and have your jewelry displayed in the National Gallery of Denmark

Details

Details & Prizes

The National Gallery of Denmark (SMK)'s Open project makes their public domain (that means copyright-free) works available to everyone. SMK's curators have picked six works to serve as inspiration for the Shapeways jewelry design contest. Winners will be displayed in the SMK alongside the art that inspired it. They will also be eligible to be sold in SMK Shapeways shop.

Prizes:
One winner and four runners up will be displayed in the SMK and sold in the SMK Shapeways shop.

How to Enter

How to Enter


1

DESIGN

Draw inspiration from one (or more than one) of the six selected works from SMK’s collection.

2

CREATE

Create and type of jewelry based on that work. Works shown below.

3

UPLOAD

Open a Shapeways shop (if you don't already have one). Upload and tag your model with 'SMK' to enter the contest. Set your model to 'public' in your Model Details page.

Click image to view full size.

Cranach Melancholia

Lucas Cranach the Elder (German, ca. 1472 - 1553)

Melancholy, 1532 / Oil on panel / 51 x 97 cm

With only a stick to help them, three nude boy children attempt to play a game, the object of which is to pass a large ball through a hoop. A winged woman, lost in thought, splits a stick, seemingly in the process of making another hoop.

Through reference to a similar figure in an Albrecht Dürer print, the seated female has been read as a personification of Melancholy, one of the four temperaments. The other three were the choleric, the sanguine, and the phlegmatic temperaments. Each of these corresponded to other elements, metals, animals, and seasons. In Cranach’s painting, melancholy seems to be linked to something negative: a demonic witches’ ride takes place in a black cloud outside.

Creative Commons Public Domain

Ring: The artists wife

L.A. Ring (Danish, 1854 - 1933)

At the French Windows. The Artist's Wife, 1897 / Oil on canvas / 191 x 144 cm

L.A. Ring was married in 1896, the year before he painted this portrait of his wife, Sigrid Kähler (1874-1923). At that time he was 42, while she was 22. Thus, it seems natural to join several other art historians in interpreting this image as a declaration of love for the artist’s pregnant wife, with the promise of spring acting as a symbol of the consummation of love.

This painting joins the ranks of many other monumental portraits of women and wives created by Danish artists in the decades around 1900. Pictures that speak of a perception of women that is gradually liberating itself from the Romantic era’s celebration of the Mother – a view of women that recoiled from both the female body and intellect – towards a more independent, quietly confident and composed type of woman that unites both body and brains.

Creative Commons Public Domain

Portrait of the Artist's Sister, Cecilie Margrethe Petersen

Christen Købke (Danish, 1810 - 1848)

Portrait of the Artist's Sister, Cecilie Margrethe Petersen / née Købke, 1835 / Oil on canvas / 94 x 74 cm

Købke's keen sense of observation and sense of colour had no equal among the other Danish artists of the era and today is considered one of the greatest Danish artists of all time. During his day, Købke was known as a straightforward, good-natured and simple-minded person who did not strive to attract attention to himself. He never did, however, obtain a prominent position within the Danish art scene during his own lifetime. His art did not win true recognition until 30-40 years after his death.

Creative Commons Public Domain

Gijsbrechts trompe l'oeil

Cornelius Norbertus Gijsbrechts (Flemish, Active 1657 - 1675)

Trompe l'Oeil with Trumpet, Celestial Globe and Proclamation by Frederik III, 1670 / Oil on canvas / 132 x 201 cm

During his four-year sojourn in Copenhagen Gijsbrechts created an extraordinary series of paintings that aimed to convince spectators that they were facing real, three-dimensional objects rather than flat paintings. The genre is called trompe l'oeil (deception of the eye) and is typical of the Baroque style with its predilection for witty illusionism, metaphor, and allegory. The genre was also popular in the rest of Europe where princes and monarchs used such paintings to amuse diplomats and distinguished guests with their clever deceptions.

Creative Commons Public Domain

Hammershoi Interior in Strandgade

Vilhelm Hammershøi (Danish, 1864 - 1916)

Interior in Strandgade, Sunlight on the Floor, 1901 / Oil on canvas / 46.5 x 52 cm

Much of Hammershøi’s work shows interiors from his homes. Over the years he would use his changing homes as studio and subject matter. He did not choose his flats at random. In an interview with the magazine Hjemmet (The Home) in 1909 Hammershøi said: "I personally prefer the Old; old buildings, old furniture, the unique and distinct atmosphere that such things possess."

Hammershøi is part of an international movement in which traditional subjects, such as interiors, are used to investigate the painterly space. The artists accentuate phenomena such as light, air, and water over narrative, and their attention is focused on how they apply paint to the canvas.

Creative Commons Public Domain

An Egyptian Fellah Woman with her Baby

Elisabeth Jerichau Baumann (Danish, 1819 - 1881)

An Egyptian Fellah Woman with her Baby, 1872 / Oil on canvas / 98.5 x 129.2 cm

Baumann was a rare artist in her own day. Partly because she was a woman, but also because of her unusual openness towards the exotic and the unknown. This painting is an excellent example of Baumann's keen sense for the erotic and the sensuous.

This painting of an Egyptian farm worker is among the most striking of Jerichau Baumann's oriental scenes. The nudity beneath the sheer silk fabric, the exotic jewellery, the reddening evening sky, and the dark colours all infuse it with a sensuous quality that must have had a strong impact in the 1870s, a time when the body was still viewed with suspicion.

Indeed, Elisabeth Jerichau Baumann occupies a unique position within Danish post-1850 art in more ways than one. Hailing from a Polish-German background, she had a wider horizon than most Danish artists, who would primarily strive to identify and cultivate the uniquely Danish. She had an openness to all things foreign and exotic that was rarely seen in Denmark at the time; her only real match in that regard would be Hans Christian Andersen. The wanderlust of an artist took her to Turkey, Greece, and Egypt (1869-70 and 1874-75), furnishing her with a rich fount of oriental motifs.

Creative Commons Public Domain

Judges


judge-suzanne-ramljak

Suzanne Ramljak

Editor, Metalsmith Magazine

judge-lauren-slowik

Lauren Slowik

Designer - Evangelist, Education, Shapeways

judge-rine-rodin-flyckt

Rine Rodin Flyckt

Digital Producer, 3D expert, SMK

judge-virginia-gordon

Virginia Gordon

Community Manager, Shapeways

judge-ann-hage-thomsen

Ann Hage Thomsen

Customer Services, SMK Shop

judge-merete-sanderhoff

Merete Sanderhoff

Curator and Senior Advisor in Digital Museum Practice, SMK

judge-josephine-winther

Josephine Winther

Head of the Accessory Design track, Kolding Design School

SMK Entries


customize
$74.80 by ideas
$39.95 by Prexus
$104.00 by KoenVanDaele
$27.50 by Prexus

Contest Rules, Terms and Conditions


  1. Eligibility. This contest is operated by Shapeways in collaboration with the National Gallery of Denmark (SMK). It is open to Shapeways users over 13 years of age at the time of entry who live in a jurisdiction that does not prohibit this contest. Employees, officers, and directors of Shapeways or SMK and their immediate family are not eligible to enter. Judges of this contest and their immediate family are not eligible to enter. Individuals may enter more than one entry into the competition but may not do so by way of automated means. By entering this contest, you agree to be bound by these Rules. All entries must comply with and are also bound by the Shapeways general Terms and Conditions.
  2. Prize. There will be one winner and four runners up. The winning and running up entries will be displayed in the SMK and featured in SMK and Shapeways promotional material. The winners and runners up will also each receive Shapeways printing credit of no more than $200 equal to the cost of printing the winning entry in silver.
  3. Contest period. This contest is open from 12:01 am New York time on May 24, 2017 to 11:59 pm New York time on June 23, 2017.
  4. How to Enter. Entries must draw inspiration from one of the SMK works selected as part of this contest. All entries must be uploaded to a public Shapeways shop and tagged with 'SMK'.
  5. Winner Selection. Shapeways will select the winner from the pool of applicants by July 14, 2017. Shapeways will be prepared to award the winning and running up prizes to alternates in the event they cannot be contacted in a reasonable amount of time. The jury selected by Shapeways and SMK will determine the winner based solely on their individual aesthetic and intellectual judgment as to how well the entries draw inspiration from the SMK works. In the event of a tie, the entry that is deemed to be most unique will be declared the winner.
  6. Winner notification. The winner will be notified via the email in their Shapeways account. Upon contact, Shapeways may need to obtain confirmation of the winner’s eligibility. If Shapeways cannot contact the winner through the contact information in their Shapeways account in a reasonable amount of time, a runner-up will receive the prize. If a runner-up cannot be contacted, Shapeways will select a third place finisher to receive the prize.
  7. Retention and Assignment of Rights. Entrants retain the copyright in their entries. By entering the contest, entrants grant Shapeways and SMK an irrevocable, perpetual, and royalty-free license to use the entries for promotional purposes, as well as to manufacture the entry for display and promotional purposes.
  8. Taxes. The winner will be solely responsible for paying all national, state, and local taxes that may be due on winnings and, as a condition of receiving the prize, Shapeways may require the winner complete tax documentation.
  9. Liability and Jurisdiction. All national, state, and local laws and regulations apply; void where prohibited. All disputes arising out of or connected with this Contest will be resolved exclusively by a court located in Manhattan, New York, USA. Decisions by Shapeways regarding the interpretation of these rules are final. By participating in this contest, you agree to release Shapeways and SMK, and their respective agents from any and all liability, claims, or actions of any kind of injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, possession, use, or misuse of any prize. Shapeways reserves the right to amend these official rules and to permanently disqualify from this contest any person it believes has intentionally violated these official rules. Shapeways reserves the right to suspend or cancel this Contest in the event of hacking, security breach, or other tampering. Any questions regarding this contest should be directed to legal@shapeways.com.
  10. Additional Considerations. Shapeways and SMK are not responsible for (i) any typographical or other error in any communication relating to the Contest; (ii) lost, illegible, late, misdirected, or incomplete, entries or emails; (iii) interrupted or unavailable satellite, network, server, Internet Service Provider (ISP), websites, telephone, cable or other connections; (iv) any technical failure or jumbled, garbled, corrupted, scrambled, failed, delayed, or misdirected transmissions; (v) hardware, software or network malfunctions; (vi) other errors of any kind whether human, mechanical, or electronic; (vi) any damage to Participant’s or any other person’s computer resulting from participation of the Contest or downloading or uploading any materials.
  11. Shapeways reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to (a) abbreviate, modify, suspend, cancel or terminate the Contest, without notice or other obligation, in the event that Sponsor is prevented from continuing with the Contest or the integrity or feasibility of the Contest is undermined in any respect, including due to fire, flood, epidemic, earthquake, labor dispute, tampering or other unlawful act, or if, in the sole opinion of Sponsor, the Contest is not capable of running as planned by reason of infection by computer virus, worms, bugs, tampering, hacking, unauthorized intervention, fraud, technical failures or any other causes which, in sole opinion of the Sponsor, corrupt or affect the administration, security, fairness, integrity or proper conduct of this Contest; (b) determine winners from entries received prior to action taken, or as otherwise deemed fair and equitable by Sponsor; and/or (c) disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry or judging or process or operation of the Contest.

Image credits:
Image of Merete Sanderhoff courtesy Kristina Alexanderson.
Images of the SMK Museum courtesy Jonas Heide Smith.

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