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Forum: Shapeways Shops
 Topic: Visitor Count Statistics?
Visitor Count Statistics? [message #102010] Thu, 30 October 2014 12:09 UTC
avatar sbhunterca  is currently offline sbhunterca
Messages: 2
Registered: November 2011
Go to my shop
Junior Member
My apologies if this has been discussed before, but a search didn't find it.

I was wondering if there is any way to track visitor count statistics for my Shapeways shop? This is an important tool- if the visitor count is low, more publicity is needed to attract potential customers, and if sales are low compared to visitor count it says something about the product line focus, pricing, etc.

My shop is very new so I expect fairly low visitor counts for a while, until my product line increases and becomes better known. I would like to track its growth, though!

Thanks,

Steve H
Re: Visitor Count Statistics? [message #102014 is a reply to message #102010 ] Thu, 30 October 2014 13:34 UTC
avatar AmLachDesigns is currently online AmLachDesigns
Messages: 1351
Registered: September 2011
Go to my shop
Shapie Expert
Use Google Analytics.

If you search the forums (use the search in the forum not the Shapeway's search) you should find some useful hints. You sign up with Google, get a code and then insert this in the correct place in your shopt setup.

It's easy - it must be, I managed to do it!
 Topic: Let's talk about pricing. Really.
Re: Let's talk about pricing. Really. [message #101995 is a reply to message #101977 ] Thu, 30 October 2014 06:39 UTC
avatar Ontogenie  is currently offline Ontogenie
Messages: 72
Registered: March 2014
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Member
I realize it's going to take some time to figure this out. And it's too late not to quit my day job, I already did that 4 years ago. :D My computer animations are funding my jewelry business at the moment, and my partner is funding me.

My stuff is niche, and yes, maybe not "grippy" enough, yet. My one advantage, though, is that I'm living at the epicenter of my niche. Every school kid in Jena knows who Ernst Haeckel is. There are even giant size renditions of his drawings in the ceramic tile of our local indoor water park. So, I don't have to educate the locals. I just have to get my stuff out in the museums and the shops, and that's coming, I'm just waiting on the last elements of the packaging to arrive in the mail.

I'm really just trying to wrap my head around how the pricing should work. If it's just a matter of trial and error, I can accept that. I was just hoping for an easier answer than that, I guess.
Re: Let's talk about pricing. Really. [message #101996 is a reply to message #101978 ] Thu, 30 October 2014 06:46 UTC
avatar Ontogenie  is currently offline Ontogenie
Messages: 72
Registered: March 2014
Go to my shop
Member
I so wish I could have been at the shopowner bootcamp, Seriaforma! I'm still hoping it shows up on youtube soon. I guess it's not surprising that the pricing structures are so different. I'm still kind of stunned that there is this HUGE difference between the Shapeways strategy and Etsy's. Personally, I think it's O.K. to charge more on Etsy because there is a great deal of value added...to be able to buy a completed piece of jewelry, with the seller's own packaging and vision, and to have personal contact with the seller. That's a much different experience than buying direct from the printer. But is it worth 400% more? Yikes.

I'm really confused, I have to say.
Re: Let's talk about pricing. Really. [message #102015 is a reply to message #101996 ] Thu, 30 October 2014 13:41 UTC
avatar stonysmith is currently online stonysmith
Messages: 2045
Registered: August 2008
Go to my shop
Shapie Expert
moderator
I know that several years ago, in the T-shirt business, the shirts would cost like $1.50 from the original manufacturer, and then they doubled in price as it went thru each segment of the distribution chain. By the time they got to the T-shirt Printing house, they were $12. My understanding is that this kind of doubling is common for retail distribution.

Personally, I choose to go with a smaller markup. This is just a hobby for me, and with the markup I chose, I make enough for me to buy new construction materials and model locomotives from time to time. That's sufficient for me.

My point is.. pick your own markup, and be happy with it. If your stuff sells, then the cost-versus-value proposition for your customers is working. If your stuff doesn't sell, then you either are charging too much, or you're not providing what the market is looking for. Nearly a quarter of my shop has never sold a single item, but I've got other items that are reaching upwards of 100 units each. I'm happy with both.

A small bit of pathos: My father-in-law passed several years ago, and he was a 40+ year retail expert. Every time the markup subject comes up, it makes me sad because he's no longer with us, and I never had the opportunity to talk to him about what markup would be "best". Also, even though my own father passed away many years before that... I still think I should use his markup concepts.......

"A nickel each, or three for a quarter." <grin>


Patience, Persistance, Politeness - the 3Ps will help us get us to Perfect Printed Products
Re: Let's talk about pricing. Really. [message #102018 is a reply to message #101996 ] Thu, 30 October 2014 13:53 UTC
avatar AmLachDesigns is currently online AmLachDesigns
Messages: 1351
Registered: September 2011
Go to my shop
Shapie Expert
This could be a complex subject, but equally you could be overthinking it.

I would start with what you think people will pay for each item (from market research, instinct etc.) - this becomes the Recommended Retail Price (RRP).
- If you sell via SW you can apply a notional discount to allow for them paying for postage and the lack of decent presentation packaging etc.
- If you sell privately (probably not a great idea in Germany because of the potential bureaucracy) you can decide another price to take into account your overheads, maybe still at a discount to the RRP.
- If you sell wholesale, you will need another price, taking into account all the above factors, but also factoring in the quantity of orders. The difference here is the negotiation of price AND quantity. I have heard (in comparison to the numbers quoted above) that the wholesale price should be 2/3 of the RRP, but none of these things are set in stone.

If you consider these factors the margin will come as a direct result. The important figures are the cost and the RRP - the % margin should not be the defining number, it is a post fact calculation. Other people's experience may be indicative, but ultimately this is your project, your designs, your marketing, your effort - don't feel constrained by these arbitrary numbers you have seen elsewhere.

Having said all that, you have to be prepared to adjust: if nothing sells, the price may be too high; if the products sell very quickly maybe your prices are too low.


I will add, to be explicit, that I am not a successful shop owner so these ideas should be judged on that basis...
Re: Let's talk about pricing. Really. [message #102021 is a reply to message #102015 ] Thu, 30 October 2014 14:09 UTC
avatar Ontogenie  is currently offline Ontogenie
Messages: 72
Registered: March 2014
Go to my shop
Member

"A nickel each, or three for a quarter." <grin>

It's decided. I'm going with this one. :D

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