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1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed

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Not a Photo

1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed
1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed

DIGITAL PREVIEW
Not a Photo

1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed
1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed

DIGITAL PREVIEW
Not a Photo

1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed
1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed

DIGITAL PREVIEW
Not a Photo

1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed
1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed

DIGITAL PREVIEW
Not a Photo

1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed
1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed

DIGITAL PREVIEW
Not a Photo

1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed
1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940 3d printed

DIGITAL PREVIEW
Not a Photo

1/200 USS Lexington CV-2 Island 1936-1940

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  • 3D printed in Frosted Ultra Detail: Matte translucent plastic that showcases fine and intricate details.
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  • This product is intended for mature audiences.
$202.20
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Product Description

Catalog (click here)

Scale: 1/200

Recommended for: GPM 1/200 scale USS Lexington CV-2 (pre-war)  (# GPM-0231K)

This model represents the bridge tower of celebrated aircraft carrier USS Lexington CV-2 as she appeared in the late 1930s during which she and her crew participated in extensive training activities laying the foundation for modern carrier warfare.

Features:
  • fully assembled
  • accurately dimensioned from US Navy Booklet of General Plans drawings
  • detail locations confirmed by careful study of photographs of the actual ship
  • proper asymmetrical deck shapes for Lexington (Saratoga's were shaped differently)
  • accurate splinter shield shapes with forward cutout (Saratoga's were shaped differently)
  • accurate fighting tops, including the aft top on the funnel, both with open windows
  • upper top Fire Control Station (the large uppermost platform on top the tripod) includes supporting structural framing with lightening holes, subtle locator disks for rangefinders (not included) and splinter shielding of a slightly different shape than Saratoga's
  • open doors, ready for your favorite photo etch
  • open portholes (airports) properly sized and located
  • detailed interior barbette bulkhead and openings
  • heavy structural supports included
  • light structural supports omitted, ready for your favorite photoetch
 
© Model Monkey Book and Hobby.  This 3D-printed item may not be copied or recast.

From Wikipedia: "USS Lexington (CV-2), nicknamed "Lady Lex",[1] was an early aircraft carrier built for the United States Navy. She was the lead ship of the Lexington class; her only sister shipSaratoga, was commissioned a month earlier. Originally designed as a battlecruiser, she was converted into one of the Navy's first aircraft carriers during construction to comply with the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922, which essentially terminated all new battleship and battlecruiser construction. The ship entered service in 1928 and was assigned to the Pacific Fleet for her entire career....

"Before Fleet Problem XIV began in February 1933, the Army and the Navy conducted a joint exercise simulating a carrier attack on Hawaii. Lexington and Saratoga successfully attacked Pearl Harbor at dawn on 31 January without being detected. During the actual fleet problem, the ship attempted to attack San Francisco, but was surprised in heavy fog by several defending battleships at close range and sunk. Fleet Problem XV returned to the Gulf of Panama and the Caribbean in April–May 1934, but the participating ships of the Pacific Fleet remained in the Caribbean and off the East Coast for more training and maneuvers until they returned to their home bases in November. Most notably during Fleet Problem XVI, April–June 1935, Lexington ran low on fuel after five days of high-speed steaming and this led to experiments with underway replenishment that later proved essential to combat operations during the Pacific War. During Fleet Problem XVII in 1936, Lexington and the smaller carrier Ranger routinely refueled their plane guard destroyers.[37]

Admiral Claude C. Bloch limited Lexington to support of the battleships during Fleet Problem XVIII in 1937 and consequently the carrier was crippled and nearly sunk by surface gunfire and torpedoes.[38] The following July, the ship participated in the unsuccessful search for Amelia Earhart.[39] The 1938 Fleet Problem again tested the defenses of Hawaii and, again, aircraft from Lexington and her sister successfully attacked Pearl Harbor at dawn on 29 March. Later in the exercise, the two carriers successfully attacked San Francisco without being spotted by the defending fleet. Fleet Problem XX held in the Caribbean in March–April 1939, was the only time before October 1943 that the Navy concentrated four carriers (LexingtonRangerYorktown, and Enterprise) together for maneuvers. This exercise also saw the first attempts to refuel carriers and battleships at sea. During Fleet Problem XXI in 1940, Lexington caught Yorktown by surprise and crippled her, although Yorktown‍ '​s aircraft managed to knock out Lexington‍ '​s flight deck. The fleet was ordered to remain in Hawaii after the conclusion of the exercise in May.[40]"
What's in the Box
INCM
1-200 Lexington '36 Bridge Tower
Frosted Ultra Detail
Width
6.3 cm
Height
12.3 cm
Depth
17.3 cm

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