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Daikoku, Japan God of wealth 3d printed

DIGITAL PREVIEW
Not a Photo

14K Gold
Daikoku, Japan God of wealth 3d printed
Daikoku, Japan God of wealth 3d printed

DIGITAL PREVIEW
Not a Photo

Daikoku, Japan God of wealth

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  • 3D printed in 14K Gold: Solid 14k Gold polished to a beautiful smooth sheen.
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  • This product is intended for mature audiences.
$3,688.80
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Product Description

In Japan, Daikokuten (大黒天), the god of great darkness or blackness, or the god of five cereals, is one of the Seven Lucky Gods. Daikokuten evolved from the Buddhist form of the Indian Deity Shiva intertwined with the Shinto god Okuninushi. The name is the Japanese equivalent of Mahakala, the Buddhist name for Shiva.

The god enjoys an exalted position as a household deity in Japan. Daikoku's association with wealth and prosperity precipitated a custom known as fukunusubi, or "theft of fortune". This custom started with the belief that whoever stole divine figures was assured of good fortune if not caught in the act. In the course of time, stealing divine images became so common a practice in Japan that the Toshi-no-ichi "year-end market" held at Senso-Ji became the main venue of the sale and disposal of such images by the fortune-seekers. Many small stalls were opened where articles including images of Daikoku were sold on the eve of New Year celebrations.

The Japanese also maintain the symbol of Mahakala as a monogram. The traditional pilgrims climbing the holy Mount Ontake wear tenugui (a kind of white scarf) with the seed syllable of Mahakala.

Daikoku is variously considered to be the god of wealth, or of the household, particularly the kitchen. He is recognised by his wide face, smile, and a flat black hat. He is often portrayed holding a golden mallet called an Uchide no kozuchi, otherwise known as a magic money mallet, and is seen seated on bales of rice, with mice nearby signifying plentiful food.

Daikoku's image was featured on the first Japanese bank note, designed by Edoardo Chiossone.

Technical Data:

This piece is 47mm in height.

For Pendant version, please click here.

                
What's in the Box
INCM
70mm LowwoLogo
14K Gold
Width
2.8 cm
Height
4.7 cm
Depth
2.6 cm

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