Update to the design rules for Ceramics

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by nancyliang, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. nancyliang
    nancyliang New Member
    Hey guys,

    First, in the future the design rules changes will be more systematic. We will update new design rules the first of every month. This way, you guys can check once a month as opposed to me posting bits and pieces at random times. This will be the last "random" material design rule updates. Unless there are emergency design rule changes in the future, we will keep to a monthly schedule.

    Now, onwards to some ceramics changes!

    1) Try to keep your unsupported "strips" short
    When ceramics are fired, unsupported parts tend to slump. So for example, if you had a spiral, the arms of the spiral would slump. Try not to have too many thin strips that are free standing. I included a picture of what could happen. Note that even if both ends are supported, the slumping can still happen.

    Just to give you an idea of what works, we've seen about a 10 cm long strip that's 1cm in diameter slump about 0.5 cm. That's 4 inch long strip with 0.5 inch diameter slump about 0.25 inches. For designs where the there are small spaces between the strips, this becomes an issue because the strips will collapse on top of one another.

    2) Engravings should be minimally 2mm deep
    Engraved designs make it easy for glaze to sink into the engravings. To keep glaze from sinking in and filling up to groves, please keep your engraved details at least 2mm deep.

    Let me know if you have any questions, we will kick these rules live Monday.

    Thanks,
    Nancy
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 1, 2011
  2. steveb2000
    steveb2000 New Member
    Will it be possible to print shapes expecting this slump? Or will any shape with an unsupported span like the examples be refused?

    Steve B
     
  3. nancyliang
    nancyliang New Member
    That is hard to say without really seeing the actual shape. But, we don't want to be in a position where we are making calls as to what is part of the design and what isn't, because there would be a lot of room for misinterpretation there and I think it would be presumptuous of us to interpret on your behalf.

    I think if something is rejected for slumping and you feel the slumpage is OK, maybe email back customer service and say you would be willing to absorb the slumpage and see if they can un-reject it for you, but of course then you would be responsible for any QA issues. This can apply for designs where the slumpage does not pose any production impact or require special handling, so if the slumping is to a point where your design will actually break, then it will remain rejected.

    Hope that helps!

    Thanks,
    Nancy
     
  4. steveb2000
    steveb2000 New Member
    Thanks, I don't have any immediate plans for it, but with traditional processes I sometimes play with the limitations of materials etc to get a more interesting result. Good to know it might be possible to design in a bit of failure.

    Steve B