Helping Teachers Learn 3D Design and Printing

Discussion in 'Students and Educators' started by pintstein, Jun 12, 2016.

Makeathon

Poll closed Jan 31, 1970.
  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Only if ...

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Probably but ...

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. pintstein
    pintstein New Member
    I'm a substitute teacher with a startup company aiming to provide 3D printer education and repair services to schools, libraries and hobbyists. I have purposely been getting experience repairing and recalibrating a wide range of FFF printers so that I can fix, recalibrate or at least diagnose the problem within two hours of seeing a machine for the first time. When I substitute teach there is often a planning period or two that I am imagining I could use to get machines in good working order.

    The biggest problem with this business model is that 3D printing is difficult to learn and few teachers have the time to master it. In an attempt to solve that problem, I am hosting a Makeathon at Twin Cities Makerspace designed to give teachers the hands on experience they need to use a 3D printer in their classroom. Do you think a 28 hour party with access to five 3D printers and an instructor skilled in Blender, TinkerCAD, OpenSCAD and Fusion 360 would be sufficient to give teachers a base for exploring the world of 3D printing? http://pintsteinpro.com/make.html
     

    Attached Files:

  2. bctswacct
    bctswacct New Member
    Neat idea.

    For what it's worth, I was able to pick up OpenSCAD and complete a simple design in about an hour. I had previously put off learning 3D printing because traditional CAD programs with all of the buttons and commands seemed daunting, but I am quite familiar with geometry and programming. OpenSCAD is such a pleasure to use.

    Also, using a 3D printing service (guess which one) instead of having to buy and futz with my own printer made starting out super easy.
     
  3. bctswacct
    bctswacct New Member
    The attached image, which I assume is a poster, had me confused. At first I thought it buried the lede, since I didn't know that your class was the only thing at this makeathon. I assumed that a makeathon would have a bunch of different classes and exhibits, and I guess I'm just unfamiliar with the term. Is your target audience familiar with the term?

    Some of the essential details are in the smallest text at the bottom of the poster. The only mention of the location (Twin Cities Maker) is in a sentence that otherwise contains superfluous information (presence of CNC machines and laser cutter), and no address or website is given. The logistics of a 28 hour event are also quite unclear to me -- would I have to stay there for the whole time? That would not correspond well to adequate food and sleep.

    Like I said before, it's a cool idea, but maybe condense the information a bit and perhaps provide a website so people can look up details.

    Finally, a 28 hour event seems geared to people who are already devoted to 3D printing. Perhaps something shorter and simpler that simply exposes people to the topic and whets their appetite for more self-directed engagement would be more appropriate. I could totally go for a one or two hour class where everyone goes through a tutorial to design some geometric object or other basic educational demo and leaves with a model file that they can have printed by a service.

    Just getting the idea, "I can do this," was all it took for me to become interested in 3D printing and to seek out more info on my own.