FUD Interlocking parts??

Discussion in 'Technologies and Hardware' started by kolo, Jul 21, 2011.

  1. kolo
    kolo New Member
    Interlocking parts: accepted, gap between parts must be at least 0.05 mm.

    Could anyone explain exactly what the above means for FUD? Does it mean that if I want to design something that should move (i.e. an axle in a bearing), I need to have 0.05 mm between the parts. In that case it sounds like a quite small gap.

    Kjell
     
  2. duann
    duann New Member
    Thats right Kjell,
    That is the absolute minimum space but it would also of course depend on how it could be cleaned out, you can make of course make it bigger.

    Cheers
     
  3. BillBedford
    BillBedford New Member
    I think it is more complicated that that, and the area of the sliding surfaces has to be taken into account. I have piece to test the optimum gaps on order at the moment.
     
  4. kolo
    kolo New Member
    Thanks for the very quick reply Duann. Interesting!

    So this means that the design in the picture below would work? I would be able to move the axle?

    [​IMG]

    If that's the case I'm very impressed.. :)

    Kjell
     
  5. kolo
    kolo New Member
    Hi Bill,

    Thanks for the input. Any feeling for how big the gap needs to be? I saw a picture of your printed screw couplings in some tread (or might have been on your page), did they work out well, if yes which gap did you use?

    Kjell


     
  6. Berkeley Gang
    Berkeley Gang New Member
    This topic comes very close to my first question, but the answers still leave me puzzled. The model I have in mind has flat panels. Think of, perhaps, panel lines on an aircraft fuselage or wing. Or a door panel adjacent to a fender on a car. The two panels are coplaner and adjoining.

    I could model these with essentially a scribed line, but then the resolution would be 0.1mm, because that's the minimum detail thickness, right? So how would I design something with separate but interlocking panels, in order to get the gap down to this 0.05 mm gap between the two panels?

    aTdHvAaNnKcSe,
    Berkeley Gang
     
  7. stonysmith
    stonysmith Well-Known Member Moderator
    Consider this design:
    interlocking.jpg

    These three peices can print in a single pass, beside each other as depicted, and the panels will separate after printing. It's acceptable for the gap to be 0.05mm, but I've found that it works slightly better when you maintain a gap twice that.

    I've got several models in my shop that have wheels that rotate, and they were designed with a 0.1mm gap.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2011
  8. duann
    duann New Member
    Hey BG,

    I could model these with essentially a scribed line, but then the resolution would be 0.1mm, because that's the minimum detail thickness, right?

    No, that would mean you had 0.1mm wall thickness at that point, not a .1mm detail, if the part was extruding .1mm that would be a detail.

    So how would I design something with separate but interlocking panels, in order to get the gap down to this 0.05 mm gap between the two panels?

    You would need to model with a space between the parts, and perhaps use tabs, or some other mechanisim to get them to lock together under pressure.

     
  9. Berkeley Gang
    Berkeley Gang New Member
    Assume I have sufficient depth to keep the part rigid. A scribe line depth of 25% of the thickness, let's say. How thin could the scribe line be rendered?

    See attached file. What would the minimum (non-zero)dimensions for d and t be?

    The way I interpret your remarks, from a flat surface, I could have a detail that protruded a minimum of 0.1mm - say, a door handle or simulated exterior hinge (working doors are not a requirement of my model). Is that correct?

    Thanks for getting back to me so quickly. I appreciate your help duann and Stonysmith, and especially your willingness to help a newbie. :D

    Berkeley Gang
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 20, 2011