Ceramics DodBox

Discussion in 'My Shapeways Order Arrived' started by Magic, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. Magic
    Magic Well-Known Member
    The Ceramics DodBox arrived!

    It's made of two identical parts that form a dodecahedron similar to the Truncated Sphere D12.
    This is the bigger model I ever printed, and the walls are really thick!
    IMG_3612.JPG

    Please check the video.

    I am very pleased with it, in particular the ways the box can be closed. The colors are great too!

    But I am wondering if I should remove the pegs and holes at the bottom:
    - I though they would be big enough the allow the bottom to be glazed but this is not the case.
    - they are used to stack the boxes, but I am unsure this is really useful.
    IMG_3613.JPG

    Perhaps a flat bottom would be more aesthetical.

    What do you think?

     
  2. virtox
    virtox Active Member Moderator
    Oohw is it Magic Friday again? :)

    Love them! Very cute! :nod:

    I would recommend to really avoid these sharp edges in ceramics, it reduces the look and feel a lot.
    Then again in this model it is almost a must for the best fit/seal ;)

    Again kudos ;)

    Stijn


     
  3. Magic
    Magic Well-Known Member
    :laughing:

    Yes, I wanted to have softer edges, but my software refused to work properly (first it was difficult to select the appropriate edges and second the result was very very bad).
    What software could I use to bevel the edges properly?

     
  4. Magic
    Magic Well-Known Member
    By going back and forth from my software to Meshlab, I got a 2mm radius on each edge.
    I also reduced the thickness to 7.5mm instead of 10mm to get an acceptable cost (the internal volume is still the same), and I removed the holes and pegs of the bottom.
    Et voilà: the Ceramics DodBox v2!
    I will have to wait a little bit before I order it though, because I already have another order on its way (and I am out of money also :))

     
  5. opresco
    opresco New Member
    Hi Stijn,

    >>I would recommend to really avoid these sharp edges in ceramics, it reduces the look and feel a lot.

    Other than aesthetics (sorry to disappoint you on this), do you think
    the models below will print /glaze/fire OK? How about lettering?; do you think it'll show on the printed piece?

    Sake Cup #7
    http://shpws.me/8D8l

    Sake Finger Cup #7a
    http://shpws.me/8HUs

    Sake Finger Cup #7
    http://shpws.me/8HSB


    Thanks,
     
  6. opresco
    opresco New Member
    Very nice!
    I think a flat glazed bottom will look better; but, will they do it?
     
  7. Magic
    Magic Well-Known Member
    Thanks Opresco, I know you like polyhedra too... :)

    If I make it flat, the bottom will remain unglazed. The reason why I added the pegs was to have all the bottom glazed except the pegs, but it failed: I guess the pegs were not high enough. The inside of the holes are glazed though. But I think i prefer having the bottom of the box unglazed and keep the original and simple shape.

    To answer your questions, please check the Design Rules:
    and
    I don't know if your text is big enough to print, and I am afraid that your ring will not support the weight of the dodecahedron or at least will not easily stand vertically during the glazing phase...

    It would be nice to give it a try but that's a pity Glazed Ceramics is so expensive: it is difficult to make prototypes in those conditions...
     
  8. opresco
    opresco New Member
    FingerCupDish_Magic_05.jpg

    Thanks Magic,

    >>>I don't know if your text is big enough to print, and I am afraid that your ring will not support the weight of the dodecahedron or at least will not easily stand vertically during the glazing phase...
    It would be nice to give it a try but that's a pity Glazed Ceramics is so expensive: it is difficult to make prototypes in those conditions..

    I gave this a try (see link below), and the ring (4 mm at the thinnest) managed to support it).

    Espresso & Sake Finger Cup
    http://shpws.me/8fH4

    I am using the same ring specs for the entire series of finger cups.
    If /when I get them printed I'll post the results in "It Arrived".
    Sake Finger Cup #7
    http://shpws.me/8HSB

    Thanks for directing me to Design Rules. But, as you very well know, without breaking them we'll end up with bulky, very expensive prototypes ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2012
  9. Magic
    Magic Well-Known Member
    Ahaha! For sure we need cascadors to take risks on the design side!
    I confess I wouldn't have bet the ring could support the cup!
    That's very surprising what 3D printing can do with Ceramics, as long as you believe it can be done...

    What is the thickness of your Espresso & Sake Finger Cup?

    PS: Great dice by the way.
     
  10. opresco
    opresco New Member
    Espresso & Sake Finger Cup
    http://shpws.me/8fH4

    In the actual stl file:
    Cup wall thickness: 2.8 mm
    Dish: 2.5 mm
    Ring Inner Diameter: 21 mm

    In the ceramics printed piece:
    Cup wall thickness: 4 mm
    Dish: 2.7 mm
    Ring Inner Diameter: 20 mm
    (no wonder the ring would not fit my finger; the stl file is updated now with 24mm ID in the ring)

    I know, It's the glaze that screws up the dimensions; I have an idea for a design in ceramics where the dimensions of the printed piece are critical (it has to snap fit an existing object).
    Based upon my findings above, I'm going to give it a try soon, when I get rich :).
    ----------
    Some of the dice in the pics are my concept for a new class in dice: "Spring Loaded Dice" :) See links below.

    Spring-loaded Icodie
    http://shpws.me/6nrb

    Spring-loaded 30-sided die
    http://shpws.me/6nqb

    Spring-loaded die
    http://shpws.me/6nAa

    Spring-Loaded Dodedie
    http://shpws.me/a3lO

    Thanks again,
     
  11. Magic
    Magic Well-Known Member
    Next time I will probably try a smaller version (3mm thickness).
    See this post for more information.

     
  12. opresco
    opresco New Member
    “The only way to discover the limits of the possible
    is to go beyond them into the impossible.”
    Arthur C. Clarke



     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012