Alumide + water

Discussion in 'Technologies and Hardware' started by trikko, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. trikko
    trikko New Member
    I read that alumide is not watertight. Ok, but what does it mean? If i build a box 10x10x10 cm with water and i try to fill with water, what's happen?

    - Does alumide degrade?
    - How long does it take to empty box? Seconds? Minutes? Hours?
    - If I build something like a water mill does it work? (who cares if it's a bit porous?)

    What about white strong and flexible?

    Thanks in advance,
    Andrea
     
  2. Youknowwho4eva
    Youknowwho4eva Shapeways Employee Community Team


    - Does alumide degrade? I don't think so, Possibly someone has tried and can comment.
    - How long does it take to empty box? Seconds? Minutes? Hours? Depends on the wall thickness, surface area, temperature, atmospheric pressure, ect. but no give an answer, very slowly.
    - If I build something like a water mill does it work? (who cares if it's a bit porous?) With the right tolerances it will work to start. But, it will probably not work as intended as it becomes saturated with water

    What about white strong and flexible? All WSF based materials are not water tight. Not sure if the Glossy was, or if there are any plans on bringing it back. If you weren't here for that, Glossy was WSF that was post processed to have a smooth glossy finish.
     
  3. TomZ
    TomZ New Member
    The glossy material was actually a white version of Grey Robust.

    I think a water mill would work quite nicely. I actually noticed that WSF is a little hydrophobic, a droplet will float around on the surface, it doesn't get absorbed quickly.

    As an experiment, I just filled a small part with .7mm walls with water. For now it's looking really good, no water is visible on the external surfaces yet. I will keep you updated.
     
  4. Youknowwho4eva
    Youknowwho4eva Shapeways Employee Community Team
    You are right, it was the detail material, my mistake.
     
  5. trikko
    trikko New Member
    So good TomZ, any news from there?
     
  6. TomZ
    TomZ New Member
    The water has been sitting in the part ever since I made my post and nothing has leaked out. The outside feels a little damp but not wet.

    In any case, you could always make the part watertight by brushing it with superglue.
     
  7. trikko
    trikko New Member
    Thanks Tomz great report!

    Unfortunately I can not brush it using superglue as some internal parts are not accessible with a brush. (the same problem that prevented me from printing with "white/transparent details" materials - shapeways can't clean it inside)

     
  8. stop4stuff
    stop4stuff Well-Known Member
    Use a thin superglue, it will soak into the WSF (or Alumide) easier than water does... but be aware that superglue will break down over time with plonged contact with cold water, in warm water the glue will break down alot quicker.

    Dipping in acrylic paint should give you a waterproof coating.