Category Archives: Design Apps

MakeVR’s virtual workshop lets you get hands-on with 3D modeling

HTC VIVE and Sixense yesterday launched MakeVR: a brand new VR-CAD tool to give designers an immersive 3D modeling experience. Because users use natural two-handed motions to drag and drop 3D objects into the virtual workspace, it’s an intuitive tool that we anticipate will appeal to a whole new world of designers and creators.

We’re excited to have been directly incorporated into MakeVR, enabling users to bring their creations to life by directly uploading and printing them via Shapeways! If you’re not quite ready, the files are also easily exportable — enabling you to tweak the files in other 3D modeling programs.

It’s awesome to see such an influx in VR and 3D modeling software because it’s giving people another way to learn 3D design, something that’s often intimidating for people without a digital or technology background. We’re really looking forward to seeing the types of things people start creating through these programs — the more accessible the world of 3D modeling, the more ideas can be brought to life!

MakeVR is available on Viveport for $19.99 and we hear they’re planning to launch a pro version with precision tools later this year! What would you create in this program?

Tutorial Tuesday 10: Modeling for 3D Printing with Cinema 4D

Cinema 4D is a powerful, professional modeling software program that can be used for 3D animations, motion graphics, and generating 3D effects. It’s also fairly intuitive, and can be used to create and export models suitable for 3D printing. Already using Cinema 4D? This post will help you figure out how to prepare your models for exporting to STL or VRML format for 3D printing. Or, if you’re new to Cinema 4D and want to learn the basics, we’ll start at the beginning with some beginner tutorials.

Getting Started with Cinema 4D

For a quick overview of how Cinema 4D works, check out the walkthough video Intro to 3D printing with Cinema 4D from The Hive. This screencast takes you quickly through the creation of a 3D-printable alien tentacle-skull design from scratch in Cinema 4D, and along the way shows you how to handle Boolean operations, work with NURBS modeling, import images from Illustrator, and prepare your model for exporting to STL.

If you’re a complete beginner to Cinema 4D, you can get started by learning along with the detailed video tutorial Cinema 4D For 3D Printing – Episode 1 – The Basics from the YouTube Print 3D Channel. This video walks through all the basics for placing, moving, and sizing objects, and for using layers to organize the elements of your design. One great thing about this particular video is that it focuses on using Cinema 4D specifically for 3D printing, and will show you how to set up your workspace, choose appropriate scale settings, and understand which Cinema 4D effects are intended for animation/visualization and which can be used to modify physical 3D models. 

The video above is just one of many useful Cinema 4D video lessons from Print 3D Channel; another one worth watching is their walkthrough video Making The Print 3D Channel Maker Coin with Cinema 4D. For more information on exporting Cinema 4D creations to STL or VRML formats for 3D printing, check out the Modeling in Cinema 4d for Shapeways tutorial.

Diving Deeper

If you have access to the online learning portal Skillshare, then you can take their very in-depth, step-by-step course Spline Modeling for 3D Printing in Cinema 4D by John Burdock, which covers basic B-spline modeling as well as how to prepare your model for exporting to Shapeways for successful prints in specific materials. There are also many Cinema 4D courses on Lynda.com, but the Skillshare course is the only one that is specifically from the perspective of using Cinema 4D for 3D printing.

For those interested in 3D printing mathematical objects with Cinema 4D, check out the Mathematical Visualization website by Dr. Elizabeth Denne from the Department of Mathematics at Washington and Lee University:

These instructions walk you step-by-step through the process of importing Mathematica models into Cinema 4D and processing them for 3D printing. For example, check out these quadratic surfaces whose equations are embedded directly into their curves:

In addition to a lot of beautiful pictures of Dr. Denne’s creations, this site includes clear, written-out instructions for an Introduction to Cinema 4D, as well as how to use Cinema 4D to create models for Calculus classes, such as Volumes by Slices and Cylindrical Shells.

Cinema 4D models at Shapeways

Here are three awesome things that were created with Cinema 4D: First, a set of stylish 3D printed cufflinks by Stefan Hepner, designed in Cinema 4D and printed in Polished Nickel Steel, with orange epoxy added after printing.

Second, this rocking Burn heart with music pendant by Andl:shop:

And, finally, this adorable Realistic Cat Coccolino modeled and textured in Cinema4D by Julian Keller for printing in Full-Color Sandstone:

Do you use Cinema 4D? Are you just getting started? We’d love to hear from you. Use the comments section below for questions and answers, or head over to the Shapeways Forum.

Tutorial Tuesday 8: Using Sculptris to 3D Model With “Digital Clay”

If you want to make an organic-looking sculpted character head or body, and you want to do it for free, then you’ll want to know how to use Sculptris. Sculptris is a free beginner 3D digital sculpting program made available by Pixologic, the company that produces the professional-grade sculpting software ZBrush. It’s very easy to learn how to use Sculptris to create complex 3D models by pushing, pulling, and stretching a digital ball of clay.

Video Tutorials

For a nice introduction to the basic tools, plus a walkthrough showing how to create character heads, check out the Sculptris Reference Tutorial video by IntroducingEmy.

To dig in even deeper, try watching these three in-depth video lessons that Mr.Brooks made for his students: Becoming Familiar With Digital Sculpting in Sculptris, Using the Grab, Scale, Rotate, Draw, Crease Brushes in Sculptris, and Using the Flatten, Inflate, Pinch, and Smooth Brushes in Sculptris.

For even more Sculptris resources, dive into the extensive Sculptris Jumpstart resource page on Thingiverse, and the video resources on the main Sculptris site.

Sculptris Models on Shapeways

Here are three fantastic Shapeways models that were designed with Sculptris. First, a beautiful Dragon Wall Hook by Kai Bracher:

Next, an elegant and mysterious Woman bust by oekart:

Finally, a scientifically intricate Honey Bee model by PeterAndrew (with wings made in ZBrush).

Have you created any models with Sculptris? Let us know in the comments. We love to hear how different designers are using sculpting software, from free programs like Sculptris to commercial software like ZBrush.

Tutorial Tuesday 5: Quick Fixes With MeshLab

Welcome to Tutorial Tuesday! This week we’ll discuss three methods for modifying 3D meshes with the free software MeshLab. When you export a 3D file to STL format, what you’re doing is creating a file that describes the surface of an object with a mesh of tiny triangles. Sometimes there are problems with that mesh that cause printability issues, and MeshLab can help you fix most of those issues to make your files ready for printing.

We’ll focus on the top three issues that can arise with meshes: having too many triangles (too fine a mesh), having triangles that are oriented incorrectly or inconsistently, and having triangles that intersect with bad geometry. MeshLab has a dizzying array of menu items with long names, but if you know just which ones to choose then you can repair these three types of issues very quickly. Let us know in the comments if you have other mesh-repair techniques to share!

Reducing Triangle Count

Shapeways can accept 3D models with up to one million triangles, but it’s surprisingly easy to go over that threshold, especially if you’re working with 3D scans or a sculpting program. To reduce the overall number of triangles in your model, open the model in MeshLab and from the Filters menu select “Remeshing, Simplification, and Reconstruction” and then “Simplification: Quadric Edge Collapse Decimation.” For more detailed information, see the Shapeways Tutorial Polygon Reduction with MeshLab as well as Mister P.’s video Mesh Processing: Decimation.

meshlab-QECD

P. S. to MeshLab veterans: Good news! MeshLab updated to a long-awaited new version in late 2016, and in the new version you can perform “QECD” multiple times in a row without crashing the program! There’s still no “undo” in MeshLab though, alas. :/

Orienting Normals

If some of your model appears “inside out” (like the black area in the image below), then you should select and flip any reversed normals using the method outlined in the recipe Using MeshLab for fixing normals in the 3D Printing with RepRap Cookbook.

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Or, try a quick overall fix in MeshLab by selecting “Normals, Curvature, and Orientation” from the Filters menu, then choosing the “Re-orient all faces coherently” tool.

Removing Non-Manifold Edges

If the mesh of your model has faces that meet together in geometrically unpleasant ways, then you’ll need to repair it before 3D printing; see the Shapeways article Fixing Non-Manifold Models. “Non-manifold” edges and vertices look those like the ones shown below from Martin Sälzle at PCL Developer’s Blog.

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You can identify and select non-manifold elements from the Filter/Selection menu in MeshLab; look at the bottom of the view window for a count of the number of bad faces. To repair any bad geometry, use the method from the MakerHome article Shrinking and Remeshing the Fidget Cube: from the Filters menu, choose “Cleaning and Repairing”, and then try some combination of the tools “Remove Duplicate Faces”, “Remove Duplicated Vertex”, “Remove Faces From Non Manifold Edges”, and/or “Remove T-Vertices by Edge Flip”.

What are your favorite fast fixes for repairing and simplifying meshes? Let us know in the comments so we can all learn how to handle mesh problems quickly and get back to designing and creating!

What if Bob Ross Taught 3D Design?

That soothing voice, those happy little trees, that simple adding of elements that are more than the sum of their parts — it can only be Bob Ross. And, just as Bob Ross loved to share the joy of painting, we LIVE to share the joy of 3D printing. So, we asked ourselves, “What if Bob could teach us 3D design?” Then, we looked hard at our Community Manager Andrew Thomas, squinted, and realized: he’s basically the Bob Ross of 3D design. That gentle voice, those mad 3D modeling skills. A wig, a Wacom Intuos4, a free download of MagicaVoxel, and a few hours later, we had launched The Joy of 3D Design With Andrew Thomas.

Check out the first episode below, and don’t miss Uncubed’s awesome feature on the making of The Joy of 3D Design. Then, all you have to do is subscribe to our YouTube channel, and let The Joy of 3D Design take you away….

Easy Custom Gifts for Your Valentine

Posted by in Design, Design Apps, Gifts

Valentine’s Day gifts can be tough. Do you go for the usual dozen roses and chocolates? Or would you rather find something… more personal? Heart-shaped jewelry is great, but with Shapeways, there’s no reason not to take it up a notch. After all, the best thing about gifts is the feeling of giving something you just know the receiver will love. And, the best thing about 3D printing is that you can find and create some of the most unique, custom, and personalizable gifts out there. Here are a few easy apps that let you truly create gifts that will speak directly to your love’s unique qualities. So, with the help of the talented designers behind these incredible apps, read on to find out how to make the most meaningful, beautiful Valentine’s Day gifts.

Ciphering

cipher

Ciphering lets you create a personalized ring unlike any other. Its physical form encodes numbers of your choosing. The ring itself looks decorated in a Morse code-like pattern, but really, it’s a message! The secret message only becomes visible only when you take the ring off your finger and either shine light, or look directly through it. The information you input is fed to an algorithm that generates the unique shape. You can also add engraved initials on the inside of the band.

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Create a piece with an anniversary, birthday, or other special date – or initials. Tell us you’ve ever seen anything like this!

Twine Jewelry

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Perhaps your valentine prefers necklaces. Never fear. Twine Jewelry lets you create a unique piece that allows you to combine two names into one lovely pendant, adding a big dose of wow factor to an already gorgeous gift. Available in a variety of materials, this pendant doesn’t break the bank when printed as a fun and colorful accessory, or you could print it in gold to show your love that you’ll be together forever.

Custom Pendant Creator

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The Custom Pendant Creator allows you to fully jump in and make your own piece. Simply draw an image on paper, take a photo (or find one online), and upload it in the Custom Pendant Creator app. Magically, you’ll see your design appear in 3D! Use the tools to adjust settings like size and softness of detail, and add a bail for the final pendant touch! Warning: this app is incredibly addictive. Print in colorful plastic or a lovely rose gold – you decide – to make this gift 100% personalized.

Happy Valentine’s Day from all of us at Shapeways. Share your best gifts with us in the comments below, and check out our Valentine’s Day collection for more lovely (get it?!) designs from our amazing community.

Easy Custom Holiday Gifts for Everyone You Love

Custom holiday gifts from independent designers were once expensive and hard to create. But this holiday season at Shapeways, we have thousands of fun and affordable ways for you to Say You Made It. Enabling you to craft one-of-a-kind personalized gifts that hold special meaning for your loved ones. From our Easy Creator apps to the thousands of customizable objects offered by our community — including personalized ceramics pieces — making extraordinary gifts for all your friends and family has never been this easy.

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Create a Christmas heirloom with the easy Ornament Creator

Does your mom still save the macaroni art you made for her in fourth grade? That’s because even a simple custom gift can have a huge impact. Thankfully, it could not be simpler to use one of our Easy Creator apps to design your own personalized pieces. Use the Ornament Creator to make a holiday heirloom, the adorable Cookie Caster to design cookie cutters for loved ones who love to bake, or Crayon Creatures to magically bring your kids’ 2D art to life.

Crayon Creatures turn kids' crayon art into 3D creatures

Crayon Creatures turn kids’ crayon art into 3D creatures

If you don’t want to make an entire custom object, you can use the Customizable option in our SHOP section, or marketplace. Here, you’ll find products that allow you to add your own messages to pieces already for sale. You can find customizable products by clicking the “Customizable” box on the left-hand side of any page in our marketplace. Underneath the box, you can also select the type of material you would like to customize.

Sometimes, the best gifts are the ones that help preserve a precious photo memory. Your mom’s favorite snapshot of you. Or the double selfie from that amazing day you spent at the ball game with your dad. What if you could turn these images into durable 3D mementos? Luckily, one of the most amazing things that you can do with Shapeways — that you cannot do anywhere else — is to create Celadon Selfies. In this store, you can select any number of lovely tiles, mugs, or ornaments to which you can apply your own image (or one of your sister, mom, dad, or pets!).

Celadon Selfies help preserve special photo memories forever

Celadon Selfies help preserve special photo memories forever

Time spent with family and friends is the most important part of our lives. What could be better than using Shapeways to create mementos of your favorite moments, and custom gifts that hold special meaning for you and your loved ones? We’re happy to offer so many unique ways to show your love this holiday season. What’s your best custom gift of all time? Let us know in the comments, and make sure to check out our Holiday Gift Guide for gifting inspiration for all the beloved people on your list.

CAD vs. Modeling: Which 3D Software to Choose?

One of the most common questions we get from those who are new to digital manufacturing is “If I want to design something, which software should I learn?”

The answer to that is a little complex, but it hinges on one simple idea: What are you trying to make? There are lots of great software packages for 3D design out there, each tailored to a different type of product design. Knowing what you are trying to make will dictate the type of software you will use.

Overall, design software falls into two camps: CAD and 3D Modeling. CAD software is used when creating industrial, mechanical objects. Alternatively, 3D modeling packages more commonly used for making organic elements used for film special effects and video games.

Depending on the goals of your design, you may use both types of software at different stages of the design process to make the final 3D-printable design.

Below, we’ll go over how they are different and provide a few examples of each software type.

 

CAD (Computer Aided Design/Drafting)

CAD programs ask the user to “draw” a 2D shape and then turn those drawings into 3D forms, as either solids or surfaces. Drafting software comes from a long lineage of product designers, architects and engineers who would draw 2D plans, complete with measurements, which would be handed over to technicians or craftspeople who would interpret the designs and make the said object. This could be done manually or with a successive process of machining. Nowadays we have tools like 3D printing so that the design can be interpreted by other software (CAM or Computer-Aided Manufacturing) to create the tool path or slicing for 3D printing.

CAD programs take these 2D drawings and digitally translate them into 3D rendered “objects.” In some cases these are just “shells” or surfaces, while other programs treat the object as mathematically solid material. Simple shapes can then be added or subtracted to create more complex forms.

Because CAD software takes its roots in 2D drafting it is mainly for functional, measured 3D objects. Any functional object around you (your phone or computer that you’re reading this blog on) was designed in CAD software.

Examples of CAD:

Solidworks: Industry standard CAD software

 

Fusion 360: Free for students, startups, and makers!

 

Tinkercad: great for beginners

 

Onshape: Cloud-based with free option

 

3D Modeling

CAD software is great for functional objects, things that need to work mechanically or fit to a real world device. That said they may not give direct enough control over a design to allow for freeform, artistic work. This is where 3D modeling software comes in. Long used by the film and video game industry to make animation and special effects, you can also use these programs to create printable 3D models.

Modeling softwares are based around surfaces created from 3D geometry. This may be based around a system called NURBS, or may be simple polygons composed of vertices, edges, and faces. In many cases, programs will let you switch between these systems with ease, depending on your workflow. These points and surfaces come together to form the edges of a 3D object.

The advantage of modeling over CAD is that modeling software gives users direct input into each vertex or surface individually or as groups. This always for different ways to manipulate the shapes, often in ways that look more organic.

Some programs are even designed to treat 3D models as if they were lumps of clay so that designers can take a more sculptural approach. Using tools that emulate traditional artistic techniques, artists can get the most out of the geometry of a digital object.

Examples of 3D modeling software:

Sketchup: Free and popular

 

Maya: Industry standard for film and animation

 

Blender: Free, open source, and runs some of Shapeways’ backend tools

 

ZBrush: Professional digital sculpting software

 

Sculptris: Simpler, free version of ZBrush for beginners

Overall, knowing what you want to achieve with your design is vital to choosing the right tool for you. If a design needs to be functional, fit to other real-world objects, or have specific measurements, starting with CAD is the way to go. If a design needs to emulate a real-world or imaginary object or showcase your artistic vision, modeling could be a solution. If a design wants to do both, try mixing and matching software within your process.

Gravity Sketch Launches a Kickstarter Campaign

We’ve been huge fans of what the Gravity Sketch team has done to make 3D design more accessible to everyone through their iPad app, Gravity Sketch iOS, which is being used by thousands of creators across the world.

As a result of all the user feedback from the app, the Gravity Sketch team embarked on developing a more advanced tool to even further lower the barriers to 3D literacy by creating a desktop and virtual reality version and have just launched a Kickstarter to fund the project.

The new experience offers users a “what you see is what you get” interface where users can interact with 3D creations in real time, in a truly three dimensional space. The team was inspired to extend this fully immersive creation experience, allowing you to tap (literally) into simple tools that enable you to create complicated shapes in seconds– all of which are sketched the exact size as you see it.

Ready to take 3D modeling into your own hands? Gravity Sketch is ready to make this possible with this VR experience. As a fun bonus, for a limited time, backers that support the Kickstarter campaign for about $19 (£15), you’ll be able to pick and receive a Shapeways 3D printed ornaments that was designed by a Gravity Sketch artist, right in time for the holidays! Check out the gorgeous options below, they’re printed out of strong and flexible plastic, with some nifty little interlocking parts!

 

From Ugly Sweaters To Pretty Pendants: A Maker Story

Having recently joined the Shapeways team as PR Lead I was extremely excited to be delving into a world of digital design and manufacturing. While my DIY background was limited to making Halloween costumes and very, very ugly Christmas sweaters (actual creations below)– the possibility of taking more complex ideas and printing them was something I couldn’t wait to tackle.

The problem was that I was a little apprehensive of where to start with tackling the world of 3D design, because it’s kind of a huge departure from my familiarity with hot glue and felt. Fortunately Shapeways has some pretty cool tools to help ease beginners into the world of digital manufacturing. My colleagues suggested that I start with the easy Custom Pendant Creator— a tool that would allow me to create a pendant either from a drawing or using one of their existing templates. Being in the market for a new signature necklace, I immediately was intrigued by the possibility of being able to create something that was undeniably something “me”. The inspiration stemmed from a PR pun I’d made, that while by no means the first, was something that became a bit of a cheeky mantra, “Pitch, please.”

While I’d been wanting to create something with this pun for years, I never had the tools or capabilities to create something quality-enough that I’d feel comfortable wearing. The pendant creator and digital manufacturing seemed like it would do just the trick here. Because I’m not particularly proud of my handwriting, I recruited my boss to write out “pitch, please” in Sharpie on a blank piece of white paper. She also added two little loops, one on the first “p” and the other on the last “e” so that I’d be able to turn it into a necklace.

I snapped a photo of the design and used Afterlight to crop the image and improve contrast between the paper and ink, ensuring the pendant creator would have an easy time identifying the outline I wanted printed.

After uploading it to the pendant creator, the automatic system check identified a few issues with my design– namely that the walls were too thin for printing in most materials. Fortunately the creator also makes it effortless to fix, giving me the option to automatically “Fix Thin Walls” at the click of a button.

Once my design was fixed and passed an initial check for printing in polished brass (my choice for this one), all I had left to do was order it and wait for my package. Two weeks later…

Yahoo! I got to hold my sassy, classy little pendant in my hand! I’m extremely excited to find the perfect chain to turn this into a necklace and proudly tell everyone, “I made this”– because it’s a huge upgrade from my DIY ugly Christmas sweaters.

Spin It to Win It! Contest

As you know we’re big fans of Gravity Sketch, the new app putting the power of 3D design at your fingertips. It’s so fun and easy in fact that today we’re celebrating it by launching a contest to win some Shapeways printing credit! Simply use the Gravity Sketch app to design and upload your original model of a spinning top to Shapeways by June 23, 2016. For the first round the top eight top designs will be 3D printed. For the second round the top three top designs will win the prizes. Details about the contest and prizes can be found here.

top

Our panel of judges, Shapeways community manager Andrew, Seyi from Gravity Sketch and top specialist Designs by Dalton, will be looking for:

  • Originality and creativity
  • Perceived physics
  • Design aesthetics
  • Best use of the Gravity Sketch app

Download the Gravity Sketch app today, upload your models to Shapeways and tag the model with ‘GravitySketchTop2016‘ to enter the contest by June 23, 2016. We can’t wait to see what spins out of your brains!

Hero Forge: Where Are They Now?

We are amazed with all the products that continue to come from designers’ imaginations and out of the printers. While 3D modeling takes some skill, we’ve seen a number of people take that mastery to the next level by creating apps that make 3D printing truly available to everyone. One of our favorite (and successful) examples we’ve seen is Hero Forge, a web-based app that lets you customize tabletop miniatures and statuettes.

hf-gnomestew

Photo courtesy of Gnome Stew

Continue reading

Create Your Own 3D Printed Fantasy Football Trophy

We are excited to introduce a new 3D printing creator app to the community designed by our own Andrew Thomas as a collaboration with Mixeelabs.com. It’s a Fantasy Football Trophy Creator app!

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With this product, you can give a football (American Football) enthusiast or the champion of your Fantasy league something customized this season, or just a friend who loves football something customized this season.

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Andrew Thomas designed this product to bring 3D Printing to the world of sports and Fantasy Football. You can choose from different logos (designed by Sue Kwong) or even upload your own graphic or logo. Create a personally branded mini-Football Helmet.

This product is made with 3D Printed Full Color Sandstone which feels like unglazed ceramics. The surface texture is slightly sandy, like fine dry coral or sandstone.

To check it out:

Head to https://www.mixeelabs.com/creator/fantasy-football-trophy

Pick from present logos or upload your own add your own text to the side and on the face guard.

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This product is 3.5 x 3.5 x 4 inches (89 x 89 x 102 mm)

What type of future creators apps would you like to see in the future that utilizes Shapeways 3D printing? Let us know in a comment below!

Shapeways Launches SVX, a Voxel Based File Format for 3D Printing

Shapeways has created a new SVX format for transmitting voxel data for 3D printing. After much research we found no existing format that satisfied our requirements. Our primary design priorities are simple definition, ease of implementation, and extensibility. There are plenty of things you could dislike about the STL format, but it’s brevity and simple implementation are not one of them.

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A voxel is a 3D dimensional pixel. Most 3D printers work internally with voxel like representations. Your 3D model is sliced into 2D image slices, each pixel represents a dot of material that the printer builds your object with. Voxel formats allow direct control over those dots. One promise of 3D printing is that complexity is free. Sadly with STL files we’ve had the disconnect that more complexity equals more triangles equals larger files. Above a certain limit you just can’t use triangles to specify the details you want in a 3D printed model. Whether that information be material allocation, density, RGB color both internal and external or a custom id that could be used for another variable, not yet available in the 3D printers on the market.

Another area that is interesting for voxel usage is in making printable objects. A mesh for 3D printing needs to meet certain mathematical properties. It is easier to write voxel software that meets these demands. This makes the barrier to entry much lower for writing creators and its especially easy to include 2D imagery into your designs. See ShapeJS for some examples. One area that is typically tricky is turning voxels into triangles. We’ve worked hard to provide some nice routines for much high quality conversion to triangles when necessary. When you upload a voxel model to Shapeways you’ll be leveraging that work, just concentrate on making the voxels right and we’ll handle the triangles if needed.

You can view the new format specification at: SVX Format. We’ve added support for voxel uploads at Shapeways so you can start sending full resolution voxel files now!

Autodesk MeshMixer: Updated with Tools for 3D Printing

Posted by in Design Apps

Autodesk MeshMixer is a fantastic free tool for importing, editing, modifying and painting  organic models.

This video showcases just how much fun it can be to use Meshmixer for 3D modeling

 

 

MeshMixer has been updated with an all-in-one suite for 3D printing, making it one heck of an app. For example, with this update, you can:

  • Generate an integrated 3D Print Preview with model analysis.
  • Automatically “make solid,” converting multiple shells into a single solid.
  • Automatically repair or hollow out models to prep it for 3D printing.

Experienced users can still manually use re-meshing, sculpting, and healing tools.

By clicking “Print,” an arsenal of simple analysis and layout tools that help visualize strength, stability and slicing loads automatically. The mesh can be sent to a desktop printer or exported to .stl.

Learn more about this user-friendly app here.