Category Archives: What’s Hot

The Week in 3D Printing

This week, we learned what it will take to 3D print homes for humans on distant planets, how 3D modeling of your head and face can give you new hair — or just perfectly fitted sunglasses — plus, we found out how to turn used analog sound equipment into smartphone-connected wizardry.

Printing a New World

This is not a 3D printer, but one day, it will have 3D printer friends

This is not a 3D printer, but one day, it will have 3D printer friends

Pioneering USC engineer Behrokh Khoshnevis told NBC how he’s working with NASA to use found materials on Mars to create 3D printed homes, machines, infrastructure… basically anything humans need to choose that Martian lifestyle. That means technologies like 3D-printing method Contour Crafting (CC), which Khoshnevis used to print a 2,500-square-foot building in less than a day — back in 2004. Our post-Earth future is looking up. Now, if we can just figure out how to get to TRAPPIST-1.

Trump Should Check This Out

ABC brought us the touching story of a woman whose upcoming wedding compelled her to address her thinning hair. Thankfully, a high-tech hairpiece created using 3D printing saved the wedding day. The result is so realistic, our hairdo-in-chief should probably know about this (please, someone tell him).

It's definitely more realistic than this

It’s definitely more realistic than this

Sunglasses, Sports, Mullets

In the search for the perfect-looking pair of sunglasses, it’s often impossible to find a pair that actually, literally fit your face. Not “too big or too small for my face shape” but rather “don’t dig into my cheeks, fall off easily, or squeeze my head oddly.” Guess what can help? 3D printing! Skelmet (they originally planned to make bike helmets) takes scans of your head and face and creates custom frames to your specific measurements, as TechCrunch reported. However, as they also noted, these frames are strictly sporty, so you’ll either end up looking like Lance Armstrong or Dog the Bounty Hunter, depending on your hair length.

Skelmet's scanning-for-sunglasses app in use

Skelmet’s scanning-for-sunglasses app in use

Pump Up the Jams

Geeky Gadgets got a little less geeky this week when they pulled a DJ move, showing us how to mix vintage knobs and switches,  3D printed parts, and an Arduino to create a smart MIDI controller. Recycled, digitized, and made with 3D printing? Pump it up.

Screenshot 2017-02-25 10.43.25

The MIDI controller of your 3D printed dreams

 

 

Trademark and Copyright Safe Harbors (again)

Safe Harbor by Flickr user Mark A. Vargas, via CC license 2.0

Safe Harbor by Flickr user Mark A. Vargas, used under CC license 2.0

Today, Shapeways, along with Kickstarter, MakerBot, and Meetup, filed comments in the U.S. Copyright Office’s multi-year study into how the copyright safe harbors that allow websites such as ours to function are working. You can read about prior developments in this study here.

The role of the safe harbors are reasonably straightforward. Websites (such as Shapeways) that allow users to post content do not know if the content being posted infringes on copyrights held by others. Without the safe harbor, this would require Shapeways (and Kickstarter and MakerBot and Meetup and Facebook and YouTube and every other site on the internet) to clear every model, comment, video, and other type of upload through the legal department before posting. In other words, without the safe harbor protecting sites from the potential copyright infringement of their users, none of these sites would exist.

Fortunately, the safe harbors allow sites such as Shapeways to assume that content posted by our users does not infringe on copyright until we hear from a rightsholder. At that point we quickly take the content down to initiate the notice-and-takedown process (details on how that process works can be found here).

These safe harbors were established as part of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (often abbreviated as the DMCA) in 1998. In 2015 the U.S. Copyright Office initiated a study of how well they were working.

In this current round of comments, we made two primary points:

First, we noted that the DMCA copyright process continues to be heavily influenced by trademark law. Including a claim of trademark infringement effectively removes an accusation of infringement from the DMCA process. Among other things, that makes it very hard for users accused of infringement to challenge that accusation. We believe any study on the DMCA copyright process should recognize that element of how the process works in the real world.

Second, we raised concerns about the framing of much of the discussion in the Study. In addition to an earlier round of comments, the Copyright Office held a series of roundtables (which, for reasons known only to the Copyright Office, it refused to record or allow to be recorded either in audio or video but did release transcripts of) to discuss the issues. In both the earlier round and at the roundtables, a great deal of attention was paid to how the largest online platform – Google – interacted with the safe harbors. In our second point we tried to remind the Copyright Office that the vast majority of websites protected by the safe harbor are not dealing with millions of automated takedown requests a year. We therefore suggested that shaping solutions or conclusions with that scenario in mind would overlook how the safe harbors operated in the vast majority of cases.

As far as we know, this will be the last round of comments in this proceeding. At some point it is likely that the Copyright Office will release their report on the safe harbors. When they do, we will make sure to update you on the blog. Let us know in the comments if you have any questions.

Finally found Waldo? Check out Hidden Folks, a game from community member Sylvain Georget

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Our community is a giant melting pot of creative designers, where 3D design is only a fraction of what the designers, makers, engineers and creators are capable of. A while back we celebrated the Academy Award nomination of Alienology, and today we want to highlight community member Sylvain Georget (visit his Shapeways shop Tegroeg), as he took his extreme detailed drawing skills to the next level by launching his own video game Hidden Folks today.

Hidden Folks is an interactive search-find-and-click game. At first, the concept might remind you of Where’s Waldo, but Hidden Folks has much more to offer. The miniature landscapes you’ll navigate through have many funny elements you can control by simply poking. Open tents, slam doors, poke crocodiles — there is so much to explore, we recommend you try it yourself. What really defines this game (besides the hilarious sound effects) are the amazing black-and-white graphics, all hand-drawn by Sylvain. Don’t let the minimalistic look of the game fool you; the world of Hidden Folks is rich in an insane amount of small but great detail — and gimmicks.

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Sylvain has been drawing miniature worlds for quite some time, and he’s translated some of them into 3D to sell in his shop Tegroeg.

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13 House by Sylvain Georget

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House 7 by Sylvain Georget

During the past years we’ve had the pleasure of collaborating with Sylvain a bunch of times, in projects for Dutch Design Week and KunstVesting Heusden, plus we printed his designs for STRP-Festival 2015, and Sylvain even attended the official Eindhoven Factory Opening event back in 2014. Seeing Sylvain use his detailed drawing skills for a whole new platform is truly inspiring.

Sylvain, congratulations to you and Adriaan de Jongh in bringing Hidden Folks to life — we can’t wait to play again!

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This Dog-Sized 3D Printed Robot Might Haunt Your Dreams

When Shapeways first teamed up with Instructables on their Design Now: 3D Printing contest in November, we couldn’t have dreamt of the level of ingenuity and innovation that would result. Not only would Grand Prize winner Brett Turnage rock the RC world with his 3D printed RC motorcycles, First Prize winner Scott Hatfield, alias Toglefritz, would shake things up in a different way.

Toglefritz’s 3D Printed Quadroped is one of the most fully realized DIY bots we’ve seen to use 3D printed parts. A Playstation 2 controller, hobby servos, and Arduino-compatible microcontrollers under the hood bring the dog-sized robot to life. And when we say life, we’re not exaggerating:

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Check out all the winners (and download their designs) at Instructables, and share your latest projects with us in the comments.

The Ultimate Football-Lover’s 3D Wishlist

Of course, when we think “football,” the next thought is “3D printing,” right? Ok, maybe that’s not exactly true. But 3D printing and football have a lot in common: they’re both heavily dependent on a grid, and they both create awesome communities that bring people together! See what we did there?

But seriously folks, the Big Game is almost here! And, for the jewelers, engineers, designers, and makers in Shapeways’ community, this is a big moment. Check out some of the awesome designs that football fans in our community have created, and add a comment if your favorite football-related product isn’t featured:

Jackie’s Football Ring

football ring

Football Field Phone Case

football phone cover

Football Laces Koozie

coozie football

Football Webcam Security Cover

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BONUS: Show your team pride!

Georgia State Earrings

mass earrings

Massachusetts State Earrings

Massearrings

The Week in 3D Printing

Welcome to our latest series, The Week in 3D Printing. We’ll be rounding up the juiciest tidbits from the world of 3D printing, so you don’t have to scour the internet to keep up to speed. Without further ado….

The hottest 3D printing news this week’s roundup reads like a juicy episode of a Shonda Rhimes show — there’s sex, politics, and some scandal (okay, so maybe we’re being a little dramatic). Yes, yes, yes, let us tell you all about it.

The birds, the bees, and 3D printing

As Mashable’s Katie Dupere reported yesterday, 3D printing is helping to make sex ed more accessible to blind students, something which has been otherwise impossible through traditional teaching materials (photos, video, etc). Benetech, a nonprofit using technology to drive social change, is creating 3D printed anatomical models that can be used in the classroom — eventually aiming to make the files open-source for educators.

Venus De Space by Obsidiana

Maybe Benetech can make use of Obsidiana’s astro-naughty Venus De Space…

There’s definitely skin in this game

As covered by Aatif Sulleyman at The Independent, there have been some immense developments on the ability to 3D print lab-made skin — a serious game-changer in the medical field. There are two key components we’re particularly excited about. One is that the printed skin is comprised of three layers, taking full advantage of multi-material printing. Two, digital manufacturing is all about customized creation, so it enables the material to be developed from a patient’s cells, ensuring the resulting material isn’t rejected when transplanted. The full report is here, if you want to get seriously technical.

…and in related news

Folks are holding their breaths waiting to see how Trump’s hiring freeze could affect the FDA’s advancement in medical product development. Bloomberg BNA’s Jeannie Baumann explores the specific implications of the hiring freeze and what it means for key technologies like 3D printing, big data, informatics, and more.

Ending on a wheely well done idea

Writer Bianca Britton at CNN Tech documented how Layer is using 3D digital data and 3D printing to create bespoke wheelchairs, designed to individuals’ specific biometric data and needs. With customizable mattresses, shoes, and bikes already so accessible, it’s about time someone is making the same possible for such an important product.

Celebrating Alienology’s Academy Award Nomination!

Sometimes, you stumble across a story that instantly needs to be shared. Yesterday evening, long-term community member Alienology announced out that he, as part of the Art Department team of the movie “Passengers” led by Production Designer Guy Hendricks Dyas, has been nominated for nothing less than an Academy Award for Best Production Design. The movie, starring Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt, tells a story of 5000 people making a 120-year long intergalactic journey — with the two main characters waking up from their hypersleep while only 1/4 of their way through the trip. An enormous starship called Avalon is their carefully (3D) designed carriage for the trip across the vast nothingness of space.

Back in 2009, Igor Knezevic joined the Shapeways community as Alienology. Over the years, he’s featured an impressive variety of futuristic designs in his shop, offering products ranging from jewelry to lamp shades. While we were already impressed by his designs, we were thrilled to learn that Igor’s design skills had made their way into Hollywood. HUGE congratulations to Igor for his work and for being recognized by the Academy! Check out more of Igor’s work below:


Recent work “Living Pods” together with Anouk Wipprecht for SOMFY. Read the full story behind this project here.

Alienology 1 Clothoid.A Lamp – Also featured in WIRED Magazine (US Edition – October 2012). Photo courtesy of Alienology.

Alienology 2 Dualnexus Bracelet. Photo courtesy of Alienology.

Alienology 3 Guilloche Necklace. Photo courtesy of Alienology.

RC Customization Series: Lap 2 — RC Engineering

Since launching the RC Customization Series last week, we’ve been super excited to see such a positive response to this Tamiya Hornet customization project! In case this is the first time you’re hearing about the Shapeways RC Customization Series, together with our RC expert Tijs and Adéla behind the camera, the three of us have set out on a journey into the world of customizing remote-controlled cars for the best look and performance.

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In the back you can see the assembled original Tamiya Hornet, in front all the parts printed in White Strong & Flexible plastic.

In the previous Lap of the series, we started with a default Tamiya Hornet and a set of 3D printed parts designed by Alberto Massarotto, better known as AMPro Engineering. But in order to use the 3D printed parts, we first need to make sure they fit on the original body of the Hornet. In this second Lap of the RC Customization Series, Tijs gives tips on how to remove the sprues, which drills you have to use to make sure the right screws fit, and how to tap the screw thread in the Strong & Flexible plastic parts without breaking them. While Tijs was busy preparing the parts for pre-assembly, I had a chat with Alberto in which he explains his design process and why he started in the first place! See how this all went Lap 2: RC Engineering in the video below.

Want to build your own AMPro Super Hornet? The list of parts we use for this car can be found here.

Tamiya 6
After all the preparations, the parts fit nicely on the Hornet. Next step is finishing them with colors and stickers.

EDIT: Tijs did a massive update of the building with lots of close up images on our forums – read more here!

Note we release new episodes regularly, so if there’s anything you’d like to see, make sure to share that with us in the comments below and maybe we can explore that in the next Lap of the RC Customization Series.

National Week of Making and Shapeways

The maker movement is no secret anymore and that’s a good thing. People the world over are recognizing the power of applying creative thinking to solve their unique challenges. Digital manufacturing tools like 3D printers only expand on the endless possibilities.

That’s why it’s exciting to be part of the 3rd annual National Week of Making (June 17-23). In his declaration President Obama states that “During National Week of Making, we recommit to sparking the creative confidence of all Americans and to giving them the skills, mentors, and resources they need to harness their passion and tackle some of our planet’s greatest challenges.” Our CEO Peter Weijmarshausen is at the White House for the Maker-to-Manufacturer Stakeholder event today to discuss the needs of makers looking to turn their ideas into full-time commitments. We’ll be sure to share notes from the event with our community once it concludes.

In direct response to the White House call to action for National Week of Making that encourages organizations to empower a nation of inventors and entrepreneurs by providing access to technology, Shapeways EDU and the The New York Public Library’s TechConnect Program announced a partnership to introduce creative minded patrons of the New York Public Library to the entrepreneurial side of 3D modeling and printing technology through a free, open-source curriculum. Among the many goals is to educate the public so they can further engage in the current digital era and become entrepreneurs of their own 3D creations. The collaboration will kick off in the fall with a pilot program offering multiple courses over a ten-week period.

Shapeways is also proud to have sponsored the Department of Education Career and Technical Education Makerspace Makeover Challenge contest. All participants of the contest, some 300 schools from all 50 states, participated in the bootcamp to learn the skills needed to have successful careers in the 21st century. The trophy was designed by Shapeways community member Ashley Zelinskie. In addition to the trophies we are also giving a 3D printing scholarship to one of the ten winning schools that has shown a commitment to 3D printing in education.

You can check out other projects and add to the celebration on social media with the tags #NationOfMakers and #WeekofMaking.

 

Cheerleader Uniforms (and 3D Printing) Are Going to the Supreme Court!

Posted by in What's Hot

Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that it would be considering Star Althletica v. Varsity Brands, destined to be known as “the cheerleader uniform case.”   On its face, the case is focused on the somewhat metaphysical question of when a tennis skirt and tank top cross the line into being a cheerleader uniform.

However, as we’ve written about before, the real question in the case is how copyright should apply to works that mix creative and functional elements.  Copyright protects creative works but not functional works, so drawing that line can be incredibly important.  Unfortunately, currently there are at least 10 different (somewhat conflicting) tests that try and guide the analysis.

Earlier this year Sydney Lakin and Bill Koch at Stanford Law School’s Juelsgaard IP and Innovation Clinic helped us, along with Formlabs and Matter and Form, ask the Supreme Court to step in and pick one definitive test.

Why do we care so much?  Many 3D printed objects combine both functional and design elements.  Understanding if – and how – copyright applies to them is the first step in understanding licensing, use, and many other aspects of those objects.

We don’t know when the case will be heard yet (although we are sure it won’t be until after the summer).  We’ll be sure to keep you up to date on the developments as they come out.  In the meantime, if you have any questions feel free to leave them in the comments or tweet them to @MWeinberg2D.

 

Image courtesy petful.

That Dorne Dagger on the Season Six Premiere of Game of Thrones? We 3D Printed That. [SPOILER AHEAD]

Image Credit: Macall B. Polay/HBO

Game of Thrones, Season 6 Episode 1 | Image Credit: Macall B. Polay / HBO

When Ellaria Sand whipped a dagger out of her bracelet on Sunday’s Game of Thrones season 6 premiere, we gasped, but not for the same reason you did. For months now we’ve been keeping a secret: the designers from Game of Thrones partnered with Shapeways to create items for the show and this–this!–was the dagger we had 3D printed for them.

We were thrilled to get plunged right into the heart of the seven kingdoms in collaborating with them on this hidden blade. You know, THIS one, the Dorne Dagger:

Image Credit: Tommy Dunne, Weapons Master / HBO

Ellaria’s Dagger | Image Credit: Tommy Dunne, Weapons Master / HBO

Like all the designs that make up the rich, detailed world of Game of Thrones, the dagger is intricate and gorgeously appointed, thanks to the work of Sean Forsyth (3D designer), Tommy Dunne (Weapons Master) and David O’ Brien (Bronze Art Foundry). They chose to have it 3D printed by Shapeways in high resolution Frosted Ultra Detail which is the perfect choice for such fine details–as you can see from this behind-the-scenes peek at what the dagger looked like straight off the printer.

Ellaria's Dagger, 3D Printed in Frosted Ultra Detail | Image Credit: Tommy Dunne, Weapons Master / HBO

Ellaria’s Dagger, 3D Printed in Frosted Ultra Detail | Image Credit: Tommy Dunne, Weapons Master / HBO

It was then shipped to Weapons Master Tommy Dunne, who did the meticulous work of finishing the dagger and bringing it fully to life.

Ellaria's dagger | Image Credit: Helen Sloan / HBO / www.makinggameofthrones.com

Ellaria’s dagger | Image Credit: Helen Sloan / HBO / www.makinggameofthrones.com

“I have always wanted to incorporate 3D Printing into armoury, and this was our first chance in actually doing so,” Tommy shared with us. “The outcome of the Dorne Dagger far exceeded my wildest dreams from our original drawing concept, so it was a great first experience in using this technology in our field. It was a delicate scene to shoot, but the producers of the show loved the dagger so we’re really happy with the results.”

We are too, and we can’t wait to see what the producers of this show bring us next!

Are you a fan of Game of Thrones? Then click on the pictures below to shop the Game of Thrones inspired designs in our Marketplace.   Complete with dragons of course!

Got

What would you want to make for the show? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

3D Shaver – Personalize Your Shaver With 3D Printing

3D printing technology and online customization tools are opening up new possibilities in manufacturing a personalized product. And what could be more personal than shaving?

That was Philips’ thinking when it opened up its classic men’s shaver for personalization. The 3D Shaver, developed in partnership with Shapeways and Twikit and custom designed by you, is currently being offered by Philips in a limited edition trial.

3D Shaver Tool

Shavers can be configured with different handle designs and colors at 3dshaver.com. Once ordered, the custom parts are 3D printed and dyed at Shapeways’ factory in Eindhoven and shipped to Philips in the Netherlands for final manufacturing and assembly. The shaver is then packed in a custom box and shipped to you within 2-3 weeks of placing an order.

3D Shaver 4 Colors (800vers)

The 3D Shaver is exclusively available in The Netherlands. There are only 125 3D Shavers available and only two shavers can be ordered per day. A large number already have been sold, so you’ll have to move fast to get one.

We’re excited to partner with Philips on this and they have long shared Shapeways vision for the future of 3D printing; we were founded in 2007 in Eindhoven as part of Philips’ lifestyle incubator and look forward to working with them on more personalized products in the future.

Is 3D Printing the Next Industrial Revolution?

“Is 3D printing the next industrial revolution, or just hype?”

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We get asked this question a lot. The answer, as Peter Weijmarshausen, Shapeways Founder and CEO, has been sharing this past month in talks at SxSW and Inside 3D Printing NYC, and in interviews with Xconomy and 3DPrint.com, is a resounding yes—digital manufacturing will be the third industrial revolution and will change the who, what, where and when of how goods are made.

Until now, several factors have been holding this manufacturing revolution in check: 3D printing needs to be less expensive, have faster turnaround, offer more materials, produce better quality, and print in full color. The very things we hear regularly from you! 3D printing technology has not innovated fast enough to keep up with demand and not at the rate we’ve grown to expect from software. The same 3D printing machines Shapeways started printing on eight years ago still run today, and run as well as new machines on the market.

But that’s about to change.

“The fact [that] we see huge corporations with huge budgets and resources starting to take industrial 3D printing very seriously means that the qualities and capabilities of those machines will start to rapidly evolve, which is exactly what the industry needs,” Pete told Xconomy.

“We also see a lot of money pouring into new startups, which is something I also asked the investment community to do, into companies like Carbon3D, Desktop Metal, and Formlabs. We see big companies and small companies starting to tackle the technology challenges the industry faces. As a result, the end user will get much better products exactly as they want them.”

HP, and possibly Canon, is coming out with new 3D printing technology this year that will be 10-100x faster than current machines. It will print more materials, print them at a fraction of the current cost, and the quality will be significantly higher. Not to mention, they’ll also print in full color.

Combine these innovations with three major trends—the rise of megacities, globalization and digital disruption—and the grounds for an industrial revolution have been set.

Who produces products will shift from major brands that mass manufacture goods based on market research to individuals who will design what they want when they want it or who will work with designers to create what they want.

It will change what gets produced. With the ability to produce goods on demand, the huge investment to mass manufacture disappears and more experimentation can occur. A variety of new products will come into existence—with digital files sent from around the world to be printed locally.

Factories will no longer need to be enormous and located where labor is cheap with products shipped worldwide from these central locations, putting a strain on environmental resources like the crude oil used to fuel container ships. Instead, small factories can be housed in or right outside of major cities, with products customized to suit that city’s needs and culture.

And time to market will be drastically reduced—shrinking from months or years of lead time to research, test and market products to mere days.

We already see this revolution happening at Shapeways, but it’s not real for most people yet. They may be aware of 3D printing, but they haven’t tried it because they don’t see why they should. There are two killer apps evolving this year that, added to the innovations in 3D printing technology, will make 3D printing mainstream.

  • 3D scanning—The reaction we’ve seen to being able to create scans of people at parties or of loved ones to send to family members has been overwhelming. There is an instant emotional connection, as well as an intellectual understanding of how a digital file can be turned into a tangible, physical object. With the next generation of phones being equipped with scanners, wide spread adoption is close at hand.

  • Customization—The time and expense needed to make customizing mass produced goods, like sneakers, a good experience has been enormous. We’ve been developing tools, like CustomMaker, that enable people to customize designs on Shapeways, such as adding your name or picture to a product. Since CustomMaker’s launch, over 2,000 customizable products have been added to the site with more being created every day. By opening up product customization on this level, more and more people will expect to be able to put their personal stamp on the items they buy and will seek out 3D printed goods.

And there is so much more to come. What we make is defined by how it can be assembled, but with the evolution of 3D printing technology and of new materials, how materials and shapes merge will change completely. Even 4D printing could become a reality—where items assemble themselves out of the box due to a reaction with light, or heat, or a chemical being added to it.

As Pete shared with 3DPrint.com, “People have been led to believe that 3D printers as they are today are close to what is possible — I think the opposite is true. We are at early days in this technology. So many things will become possible that people haven’t thought possible, it’s going to revolutionize how we make products.”

To read more about Pete’s keynote at Inside 3D Printing NYC, check out his interviews with 3DPrint.com and Xconomy.

Tell us what you think about the next industrial revolution in the comments, or share your thoughts with Pete on Twitter: @Weijmarshausen.

 

Trademark and Copyright Safe Harbors

On Friday we, along with our colleagues at Etsy, Foursquare, Kickstarter, Makerbot, and Stratasys, filed comments with the United States Copyright Office regarding how copyright works online.  The Copyright Office had requested the comments as part of a study it is doing in the laws that allow websites like ours to let anyone with an account share their work with the world.

Specifically, the study was on what is known as Section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).  This provision is what gives structure to our copyright complaint process.

The provision is important, but imperfect. It was drafted in 1998 – eons ago in internet time – and it is good that the Copyright Office is taking the opportunity to ask questions about how the provision is working in the real world.

While there are plenty of things that we could have mentioned in our comments, our focus was not strictly on copyright.  Instead, we collectively decided to explain to the Copyright Office how trademark is impacting copyright online.

We have raised this issue before.  Back in October, as part of a similar group we filed a similar set of comments with the White House Intellectual Property Coordinator. We also highlighted the impact that trademark complaints have in the Shapeways transparency report released in February.

At its core, our concern is that Section 512 establishes a carefully calibrated balance between users, rightsholders, and online platforms.  It incorporates checks and balances designed to give everyone an opportunity to be treated fairly.

However, the entire system is limited to the world of copyright.  When rightsholders incorporate trademark claims in their takedown requests – something that, as we highlight in the transparency report, happens often – those balances disappear.  As a result, no review of the Section 512 system is completely without an understanding of the broader context that it operates within.

This is not the last word, or the only word, on this issue.  As mentioned earlier, even the parts of the Section 512 system that are directly tied to copyright are imperfect.  Many of the other comments submitted to the Copyright Office draw attention to those imperfections. Similarly, the just released study by Jennifer Urban, Joe Karaganis, and Briana Schofield on this process contributes important data about how the system operates day-to-day to the conversation.  If you are interested in this issue it provides a fantastic resource.

For now we will continue to operate within the current legal structures and balance the rights of everyone connected to the Shapeways platform.  At the same time, we will work to make sure that policymakers understand how the systems designed in law operate in practice.  As with the previous comment, we hope that this provides an opportunity to policymakers to reexamine the scope of safe harbors and reevaluate them in light of the goals they were intended to achieve.

Making a Case for The Apple Watch | Shapeways Reviews

You open a door in a hurry and simultaneously smash your wrist on the doorframe. Sure it hurts, but you also hear a slight crunch. You look down, and sure enough, your brand new Apple Watch’s screen is smashed to bits.

Which is where today’s review comes into play. We’re taking a look at two Apple Watch cases with slightly different form factors.

Now, you may be thinking, “why do I need a case for my watch? I wouldn’t put one on my Rolex, or Omega” But that’s where the Apple Watch separates itself from traditional watches whose screens “take a beating”. The iWatch will get damaged far before a nice traditional watch will. So cover up!

MVI_4378.00_00_26_19.Still001

The first case we’re checking out is Dungstar’s 14k rose gold plated cover. This attractive yet functional cover looks great, feels great and gives the device a cool, unique look.

Getting the cover on is simple and anchors it to the watch.

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Pull the bands off your watch Snap the cover right on top, aligning the buttons.

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Slide the bands back to lock into place.

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Taking a look at this case you can see it offers pretty solid coverage around the entire case, while leaving the screen somewhat exposed. This makes sure you’re never blocked while using the watch, allowing full-motion access to all of the screen, without eliminating the sleek and minimalistic form factor.

The second protector we’re looking at is a 18k gold plated cover by Mstyle183. Assembly is the exact same as with the previous case, using the bands to lock the cover in place.

MVI_4378.00_01_37_23.Still005

At first glance, the case looks almost the exact same too, but once you look closer, and start using the watch, you notice that it covers the screen quite a bit more. It helps to protect a bit more of the front of the watch, which makes it a little bulkier.

If you’re looking for a sleek, minimalistic case for your Apple Watch, Dungstar’s design is a great option. But if you want something that provides a bit more protection, definitely check out Mstyle183’s option. Check out our full video review here:

Do you have one of these cases? Let us know what you think about it. Leave your comments below, and let us know what you want to get out of these reviews.

Follow Dungstar on Shapeways here

Follow Mstyle183 on Shapeways here

Follow Seth on Shapeways here