Tag Archives: 3d printed jewelry

This Galentine’s Day, Treat Yo Self

A Shapeways 3D printing engineer by day and a jewelry designer by night, @Yung_Crowley recently launched the winter collection of STONEDALONE on Shapeways. The collection is an assortment of digital talismans created to help conquer your digital universe… with some trinkets specifically geared towards the single ladies. The line was created to boost the wearer’s confidence and empower them to attract more positive vibes online (and off). Obviously, better juju for 2017 can’t hurt. Because this collection screams “Treat yo self”, I’ve decided to gift myself some of these pieces for Galentine’s Day:

ANDROMEDA ARM CUFF

andromeda

This is the physical manifestation of the “spell for enchanting every person you message to make ghosting impossible.” Hello, I’ll take whatever precautions I can to avoid ghosting. Apparently there’s also a new trend called “breadcrumbing,” which is like ghosting, but with occasional texts after disappearance. Cosmo pegs it as “savage AF.” I’m just going to go ahead and assume this cuff will protect me from that too.

CASSIOPEIA RING

cass ring

Described as “magnetizing your DMs to attract prospective suitors and opportunities,” I figure this ring will inspire more witty, endearing messages on any dating apps you’re on. I bet it also makes sure the messages are authored by people that are exceptionally good at the distinction between “you’re” and “your”.

AUGOEIDES RING

aug ring

This ring “makes you immune to negative haters and trolls.” Assuming the designer means those of the online variety, not bridge ones, that’s pretty helpful in today’s world of social media.

You can check out the whole collection at STONEDALONE for the perfect bling to fit your life goals. There’s even a set of earrings that help you network online, make bank, and prosper. How can you say no to that?

Jewelry From the Future

Fashion’s love affair with geometric design shows no sign of letting up, making geometry-inspired pieces perfect holiday gifts for the fashionistas in your life. At Shapeways, we see a lot of incredible geometric jewelry from our designers. The 3D design process makes manipulating mathematical shapes a natural fit. But, sometimes, a designer comes along who takes a simple idea — the polygon — and uses it to make a fashion statement that seems to come to us from the future.

Ring Poly One by AKK

Ring Poly One by AKK

AKK designer Aleksandar Kovacevic’s Poly series of rings, bracelets, and earrings started from a simple place. “In the beginning was the Polygon … the whole idea was about entering the world of jewelry design and 3D printing with a collection developed from one single polygon,” he told us.

Bangle Poly Nine by AKK

Bangle Poly Nine by AKK

“I wanted to design statement pieces for all individuals who aren’t afraid to show that they are different,” Aleksandar said of his “harmonic compositions” of polygons. Whether worn as multiple cascading, stacking pieces, or alone, the rings and bangles in the AKK shop seem to have a life — and a movement — all their own.

Earrings Poly Eleven by AKK

Earrings Poly Eleven by AKK

The groundbreaking look of AKK’s 3D printed pieces is no accident. “Without today’s 3D printing possibilities, having my own jewelry collection would still be just a thought. 3D printing technology really helped me express myself the way I could never imagine.” We hope you’ll be as inspired by Aleksandar’s creations as we were, whether you’re shopping for cutting-edge holiday gifts for stylish friends, or looking to try your hand at 3D design.

And, for even more gifting inspiration, dig into our Holiday Gift Guide, where you’ll find hundreds of ways to help your loved ones express themselves all year long.

How Does a Microbiologist Turn Into a Jeweler?

Today’s guest blog comes from Gabriel Guzman of 3D to the 3e. Gabriel, a professor of microbiology and a jewelry designer, has found a perfect way to combine his passion for science with a love of design. He lets us in on how his Crochet Pendant went from concept to reality — and helped him go from scientist to designer.

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Designer Gabriel Guzman’s Crochet Pendant and Earrings

To me, a biochemist and a microbiologist, the design process for 3D printing has a lot in common with designing an experiment in the lab. First there is a general idea that generates a possible solution — a hypothesis. Then there is the use of design tools to shape that idea into something printable. And, of course, continuous prototyping to explore different versions of the design. Finally, one of the iterations will have the aesthetics, balance, and curiosity, if you will, that might make somebody ask, “How did you do that?”

When I first began to design the Crochet Pendant, I did have a pendant in mind, but the final design didn’t emerge until after I played with a number of different iterations. The name, however, came after looking at the final design — and a crochet piece that I saw on a table. My mother used to have a lot of doilies and other table covers made with crochet.

In terms of the technical design process, I was getting my hands wet with an experimental app from Autodesk called Project Shapeshifter, which allowed for the creation of generative designs. Generative design is a method in which the final model is generated by a computer program following a set of rules or an algorithm. I started with a general shape that I had in mind, but I didn’t know what I would end up with in terms of the final object. So, I tested different parameters in Shapeshifter, until one of the many iterations had everything I wanted to see in the pendant.

I began with the idea of a circular object, with details based on the repetitive pattern of a honeycomb. Shapeshifter only generated the file to be printed, but a pendant needs a loop, a bail, or something to pass a chain through. I chose Tinkercad for that purpose because the software was free and easy to use. I designed a very simple loop, which wasn’t circular but followed the shape of the pattern, and the end result was a piece that has generated a lot of comments, but more important, a piece that I was satisfied with. Perhaps the most important lesson for me is that none of my finished designs are exactly as I first imagine them, and they really don’t have to. Every finished design is a result of tweaking, and rethinking possibilities.

The reaction from people, especially if they don’t know anything about 3D printing, is of amazement that a machine can make jewelry. The metal version of the pendant didn’t happen until about three months after I printed the first version at home in a mint-colored plastic. My wife wore the pendant during that year’s commencement ceremony and my colleagues kept asking her about the piece, and then kept asking me about how it was made. I never imagined that a piece made in plastic could draw that much attention!

For those with experience designing jewelry the old-fashioned way (by sculpting wax), they recognize what 3D printing technology can do for their own creativity. It helps them go beyond the traditional wax sculpting into digital sculpting. But, for the novice, this technology is also a way to democratize art. Perhaps the most common question I get is, “How does a microbiologist turn into a jeweler?” If people consider me a jeweler, I take that as a big compliment! After all, I didn’t go to art school, although I do have some background in graphic design, but I never fancied myself a jeweler until I began experimenting with 3D printing.

Shaping Dutch Design: Anna Ruiter

In celebration of Dutch Design Week 2016, our Shaping Dutch Design series will take a closer look at a few of the dozens of Dutch designers who are part of the Shapeways EXPO this year and, of course, our global maker community all year round. Make sure to visit us in person if you’re in Eindhoven this week, and follow us here, on InstagramTwitter, and on Facebook for live updates from #DDW16.


Anna Ruiter of Tjielp Design creates intricate jewelry that brings traditional shapes into the future. Many of her playful, stylish pieces might never have existed without 3D printing. Like her Russian doll-inspired Wireframe Heart pendants and earrings, which feature an open geodesic heart enclosing a smaller, solid faceted heart. With traditional manufacturing, creating such an object-within-an-object would be almost impossible. With 3D printing, the entire piece is created in a single print.

In Ruiter’s Heart Facet pieces, the heart becomes solid, its geometry at the forefront. The timeless symbol of love meets design’s cutting edge. Now that’s a future we can get behind.


If you’re in Eindhoven this week, come see Anna Ruiter’s designs in person at Shapeways EXPO at Dutch Design Week. If not, you can still pick out your favorite pieces from her Shapeways shop. In timeless metals or playful plastics, we promise that you — or a friend — will heart them.

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Anna Ruiter’s Wireframe Heart and Heart Facet jewelry on display at Shapeways EXPO at Dutch Design Week

Bring the Olympic Games to You

As seen and heard around the world, the 2016 Rio Olympics are in full swing. While most of us are not lucky enough to attend the live events, Shapeways has the goods you need to celebrate your favorite sports from the Summer Olympics anywhere. Bring on the Badminton, Basketball, Table Tennis, Fencing, and Golf!  Which sport do you enjoy the most?  Whether your passion comes from being a player or a spectator, our designers have got you covered.

Get in the spirit of slam dunking with this iPhone6  from lumlumpum.

This Ping ball from Shapeways designer holybowly calls for double duty as the product was designed for bounce and flexibility.  Throw it in your pocket and grab a few friends to get a match started in your location of choice.

pingball

If a golf course sounds like your terrain, here are a few product ideas to keep your game up to par.  We know that golf isn’t exactly a lightweight sport when it comes to equipment so free up some bag room with the Belt Plastic Golf Tee Holder from jlnuttle10.  Attaching the holder to your belt is as easy as one-two-tee!

Keep your razor sharp focus on the course and have some fun off the course with Desk Golf from UrbanoRodriguez.

It’s a bird… it’s a plane… it’s the Badminton Pendant Pendant from frankxie.

birdie

Marie, the designer behind this Fencing Mask Pendant, was inspired by different meanings she found within what the sport stands for: power and strength to face the fight and elegance.  Her pendant was designed to symbolize these facets.

See more designs from Marie’s shop, scientist2010 and check out other inspired pendants in last week’s blog post,  Symbols + Science= Jewelry Styles for All. 

We hope you enjoy the 2016 Olympic Games this month as we continue to spotlight designers and their creations around the world. You can catch more on the Olympics and Shapeways next week as we will be sharing a very unique story straight from Rio.  In the meantime, don’t forget to check out locally-inspired Sparks Across the Globe designer, Kjeld Pederson Junior.

Symbols + Science = Jewelry Styles for All

Looking to revamp your jewelry collection?  Symbols are one way to make a statement without going overboard.  They also lend as great conversation pieces for history buffs, trendsetters, and Biochem masters alike.  Our community across the globe has designing symbols down to an art and we’re showing you the creations you don’t want to miss. 

As the masterminds behind Shapeways shop somersault1824, Belgium designers Idoya and Luk make science look sleek. Their minimalist necklaces are perfect for channeling your inner lab geek and make for surprising, sweet gifts.

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Phi pendant from somersault1824

There is more than meets the eye with Phi! This letter is the basis for the Golden Ratio, a principle frequently found math and science which can be dated back to sacred architecture and art.  Another important fact to know: Products from somersault1824  support science education. For every pendant sold, the designers invest $5 of the profit in educational resources for scientists, students and teachers with the aim to make these resources available to everyone. Read more about the cause here.

astrocyte pendant

Neuron pendant from somersault1824

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DNA pendant from somersault1824

If you like this double helix, you may want to experiment with spirals from other Shapeways shops.  Just don’t get it twisted!  Instead, wear the Twisted Pendant by Jaacov Molcho, one of our featured designers in Sparks Across the Globe.

We also love the pendants Antonios Bliss of Athens, Greece created. His designs reflect a modern adaptation of symbols rooted in native New Mexico.

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Native America Zia Sun Symbol Jewelry Pendant from Symbolica.

Any idea what the four parts of this pendant might represent?  Here’s a hint: up to twenty different meanings can be found in total. Read more about the multifaceted design here and discover other fascinating symbols in Symbolica.

Be sure to check out other jewelry designers on Shapeways to find the symbol that suits you and explore all the beautiful options for everyday wear.

NVM Design uses 3D scanning & 3D printing to create jaw-dropping, luxe jewelry

Posted by in Fashion
Photo courtesy of NVM Design.

Photo courtesy of NVM Design.

NVM Design is melding traditional craftsmanship with 3D printing to redefine what’s possible, and the results are beautiful. Founded by Allegra Crespi and Martin Griswold (of Shapeways shop Quantitative Design), NVM creates jewelry using printers and 3D scanners to create forms that would have been impossible to create with traditional methods. Every piece is 3D printed, then hand finished by local artisans in New York City.

For their first collection, Allegra and Martin used lichen, a dry moss which grows on trees and stone, as their core inspiration. Allegra explained, “We gathered the actual lichen from Cold Spring, NY and adapted it to many of our pieces after scanning it and then digitally manipulating it to meet our vision. Our second element is a ‘crystal’ texture we generate with a computer algorithm that replicates, adjusts, and places individual cubes to create a cohesive look.” The textures are incredibly distinct, and achieved without using gems or stones.

Allegra and Martin in their studio. Photo courtesy of NVM Design.

Allegra and Martin in their studio. Photo courtesy of NVM Design.

We sat down with Allegra and Martin to learn more about their process and inspiration.

Can you describe the process you used to make the products, in particular the technology you used? 

Our first collection uses a lot of texture, and we used new technology to help us explore that in a way that would have been hard to do otherwise. 3D scanning and algorithmic 3D modeling helped us generate and modify complicated textures, and 3D printing enabled us to produce it once we had the digital model.

We produced the lichen on our pieces by 3D scanning an actual piece of lichen that we took from the forest in upstate NY, which we then digitally modified and incorporated into the pieces. We made the crystal texture with the help of python scripting in Rhino, programming thousands of operations that ran automatically based on a set of rules that we controlled. This let us explore a lot of different versions of the crystal texture until we got it just right, without having to manually compose each one.

3D Printed Jewelry

3D render for the first collection. Photo courtesy of NVM Design.

How do you balance artisanal and digital methods?

Both of us came to jewelry with very limited knowledge of how it’s made or how to make it, so we did our best to fill in the gaps by learning a lot from jewelers.

At the same time our lack of institutional knowledge proved to be so liberating. We began looking at 3D printing and other technology as the solution to most of the jewelry-related obstacles we’d encounter. We ended up taking the best of what we learned from jewelers and using new tech to rebuild it, adapt it, or simply suit it to our needs. Some of it worked, some didn’t, but we came to relish the learning process and the balance we struck between the two.

Photo courtesy of NVM Design.

Photo courtesy of NVM Design.

What materials did you 3D print in?

We produce our pieces by 3D printing in wax, and then casting those wax patterns into 14k yellow or rose gold and silver. We’ve also gotten a lot of use out of 3D printing through Shapeways in White, Strong & Flexible for early prototypes.

How did 3D printing fit into your creative process? Did it help you iterate more quickly?

Our company is based on the premise of exploration and collaboration, which extends to both the conceptual and practical elements of our work. As we developed on our creative themes, we settled on our technical outlets. Our use of 3D printing extends past the final product- we use it throughout our process: to make prototypes early on, to communicate ideas with our suppliers, and to make customized tools that help with assembly.

3D Printed Jewelry

Photo courtesy of NVM Design.

Blown away? We are! Follow their amazing work and process on Instagram. Orders can be make on www.nvmdesign.co.

Holiday finds: Unique 3D printed jewelry

Posted by in Holiday 2014

My name is Daphne Laméris and I’m an Industrial Design Engineering student in the Netherlands and Shapeways Crew Member. I simply love to design jewelry that fits with the everyday outfit. I started making jewelry because the jewelry available in the normal stores bored me a bit with their simple shapes, so I designed complex jewelry (that sometimes can only be 3D printed) without being too overbearing. The jewelry I selected to highlight from my shop is mostly inspired by nature with flowers and organic shapes since it can appeal to a wide range of people, tastes and styles.

Leaves Butterfly Pendant

3D printed neckalce pendant butterfly leaves

This butterfly pendant exists of four leaves that form the butterfly. It’s elegant and feminine. It looks absolutely gorgeous in polished brass or silver and goes with any holidays party dress.

Rose pendant

rose pendant 3D printed necklace jewelry

This pendant is a small highly detailed rose surrounded with leaves on a curled wire. The pendant is shaped elegantly and is perfect for women of all ages.

Flower earrings

3D printed flower earrings

These wireframe earrings are inspired by the shape of flowers, and stand out because of their size while still being lightweight. The earrings are very comfortable to wear and are great for women who love to have notable earrings but want to avoid weary ears.

Teardrop shaped earrings

3D printed earrings

These teardrop shaped earrings have a complex shape that can only be produced with 3D printing. The earring is detailed with a complex outer shape containing two subtle hearts and with a little drop on the inside of the earring. While the details of the shape are very unique, the outer contours confirm to the standard shapes used in jewelry.

Bracelet of 36 squares

3D printed bracelet

This elegant bracelet consists of many connected squares that can move separately. It’s a great example of the amazing, unique pieces you can make with 3D printing. Each square contains a little space that can be decorated, for example, with hotfix stones.The closing mechanism is easy to use and prints with the rest of the bracelet.

Tie clip

Tie Clip 3D printed men's jewelry

Tie clips are perfect gifts for the man whose only jewelry is a watch (and already has too many of them). This stylish tie clip suits the fashionable men and its unique shape lightens up every tie at an affordable price.

 

Shapeways Community at Dutch Design Week

Posted by in Shapeways
Shapeways Dutch Design Week 3D printing

Shapeways staff members David Gillespie and Ruud van Muijzenberg discuss 3D printing with Dutch Design Week visitors

For the fifth year in a row Shapeways is proud to participate in Dutch Design Week, a week long showcase of all that’s new and innovative in Design in the Netherlands held in our European hometown of Eindhoven. Shapeways designers and shop owners also are a big presence at Dutch Design week and had a chance to show off their 3D printed designs, jewelry and accessories. It’s my first time attending Dutch Design Week and I’ve been really excited about the innovation and energy on display, as well as the engagement of visitors, who are all enthusiastic about learning about innovative design possibilities.

3D printed Dutch Design Week products

Daphne Lameris explains the process of 3D printing with Selective Laser Sintering

The Shapeways booth features a wide selection of products that show off the possibilities of our different materials, including Strong Flexible Plastic, Full Color Sandstone, Ceramics and our many different metals, including 3D printed steel and precious metals like silver and gold. An eye catching addition to our booth this year are three clocks by Plokk, which are 3D printed in strong flexible nylon plastic. Created by Henk Hulshof and Gertjan Westerbeke these clocks bring Christiaan Huygens’ pendulum clock, as designed at his drawing board in 1656, to the 21st century. At Plokk’s Shapeways shop you can download a 3D file to adjust and customize the clock face.

3D printed clocks Dutch Design Week Plokk

Henk Hulshof shows off the Caliber 1 Plokk, a fully 3D printed clock

It’s been great to talk with visitors about how 3D printed products are made and many were amazed at the fact you could print complex objects with interlocking, moving parts at one go. They were especially taken with the Double 8 fabric squares created by Vincent Greco and the garment based on the biometrics of shark skin that was made during our Computational Fashion Masterclass.

Daphne Lameris 3D printed jewelry Dutch Design Week

Daphne Lameris displays her 3D printed jewelry

On opening weekend we were joined by Shapeways Crew member Daphne Lameris, an industrial design and engineering student who creates 3D printed jewelry and accessories. Daphne is also an expert on the 3D printing process and jumped right in to answer visitors questions about how 3D printing works. Dario Scapitta also joined us to show off his beautiful 3D printed jewelry. We were also happy to see that Shapeways shop owner Ina Sufeleers had her own exhibit  for Ola, her line of 3D printed jewelry, right near the Shapeways booth.

3D printed jewelry Dutch Design Week

Jewelers and Shapeways shop owners Ina Suffeleers and Daria Scapitta meet at Dutch Design Week

Ola jewelry 3D printed Dutch Design Week

Ina Suffeleers displays off her Ola 3D printed jewelry at Dutch Design Week

We also love meeting community members and seeing what they make with Shapeways. When Felix Mollinga came to our booth and showed us the ring he created from a scan of his face and 3D printed with Shapeways of course I had to snap a picture!

3D printing jewelry Shapeways ring Dutch Design Week

Designer Felix Mollinga shows off the ring he made from a scan of his face that he 3D printed with Shapeways

Our exhibition at Dutch Design Week is open until October 26th and we will also be joined by community members FabMe Jewelry, Somersault 18:24 and Virtox, who has joined us for 5 years at Dutch Design Week! If you are visiting Dutch Design Week this year we’d love to see you!

 

Fall Finds Pinterest Contest Winners!

Posted by in Contests

Thank you for all of the lovely entries to our Fall Finds Pinterest contest! There were so many beautiful boards to choose from, but at the end of the day, we had to pick 5 of you! A big congratulations goes to: 3D Printed Jewelry, Sloris, Meena Rao, Three Jane Jewelry (despite the board name 😉 ), and Thomas Haldenby! We’ll message you via Pinterest; if you aren’t following us already, go ahead and do so in order for us to message you to claim your prize! 

Check out their awesome boards below…

3D Printed Jewelry:

3d printed jewelry board

Sloris:

sloris board

Meena Rao:

Meena Rao board

Three Jane Jewelry:

threejaneboard

Thomas Haldenby:

thomas halde

 

 

If you have another idea for a great contest, let us know! We love the enthusiasm and support of such a great community. Thanks again to all of the entries to this contest! Again, winners don’t forget to follow us on Pinterest so we can get in touch. Feel free to email aimee @ shapeways. com as well!

Win 3D Printed Jewelry from Shapeways

Calling all jewelry lovers! We’ve teamed up with some of our wonderful designers to host not one but two contests this month.

Daily Facebook Giveaway:

We are giving away 10 amazing pieces of jewelry on Facebook! Visit our Facebook page each weekday through the end of September for a chance to win. We want to spread the word about our incredible designers, so all we’re asking is that you “like” our posts. Check back each day to see the newest giveaway!

Pin Your Favorite Jewelry on Pinterest:

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Our designers are getting ready for fall and the holidays, so we want to see what inspires you for the season. Pin your favorite fall jewelry from Shapeways and beyond for a chance to win $500 of your Shapeways picks!

How to enter:
  1. Create a Pinterest Board titled “Fall Finds”

  2. Pin at least 10 fall flavored accessories by September 30, 2014

    • At least 5 must be Shapeways products (your prize, if you win!)

    • Tag each pin #ShapewaysJewelryContest

Prizes:

Five (5) winners will be selected! Winners will receive their Shapeways pinned products, up to $500 in value. If you pin more than $500 of Shapeways products, we will work with you to select your prize products.

Don’t know where to start? Check out some of our favorite 3D printed jewelry in gold, sterling silver, stainless steel, and even colorful nylon plastic.

3D Printed Rings

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Repeat Offfender Logo Ring by RepeatOfffender. See more unique rings in Gold, Sterling Silver, or Gold Plated Brass.

3D Printed Pendants

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Silver Shell Pendant by aeron203. See more unique pendants in Sterling Silver, Gold Plated Brass, or Stainless Steel.

3D Printed Bracelets

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Lines Bracelet by geekprints. See more unique bracelets in Sterling Silver, Gold Plated Brass, Stainless Steel, or Nylon Plastic.

3D Printed Earrings

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Pinwheel Earrings by JoyComplex. See more unique 3D printed earrings.

3D Printed Cufflinks

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Lieutenant Bar Cufflinks by bluelinegecko. See more unique 3D printed cufflinks.

3D Printed Necklaces

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‘Flourish’ Pendant by seanmcharg. See more unique 3D printed necklaces.

The Fine Print: If your Shapeways products cannot be successfully 3D printed, we will work with you to select alternative prize products. Shapeways employees and their families are not eligible to win. Contests end September 30, 2014.