Author Archives: Ruud van den Muijzenberg

RC Customization Series: The Story so Far

Two months ago, inspired by our amazing — and growing! — RC car community, I set out on a journey into the world of RC cars. Colleague Tijs Lochbaum and I took a Tamiya Hornet completely apart and gave it a whole new look. We’ll be ready for the big reveal soon, but in the meantime, we’re taking a look back to see how far we’ve come.

We started with a dream of taking a classic Tamiya Hornet and making it our own. During this whole process, Tijs Lochbaum, who is a well-known European RC drifting expert, was our guide. As it turns out, I had a lot to learn about how to make a custom RC Car. I always thought you could only buy a complete car in a toy store, so a whole new world opened up for me. For one thing, I never thought so much manual polishing was involved to make the parts look good. I could go on all day about what I didn’t know — but instead, let’s take a look at what we’ve done so far:

Lap 1 – Upgrading The Tamiya Hornet


In the 1st Lap of the RC Customization Series, we explain our plan and what we need to create a custom RC car classic, the Tamiya Hornet.

Lap 2 – RC Engineering


The 2nd Lap features an interview with designer Alberto Massarotto from AMPro Engineering. Alberto takes us through his design process to guarantee his parts fit on original RC car body and chassis.

Lap 3 – Finalizing the Parts


On Lap 3, we look at post-production methods. Polishing, dyeing, sanding and preparing for spray-painting — we covered it all.

We’ve come a long way already, and we just have a few finishing touches to add. In the meantime, here’s a teaser shot of our completed Tamiya Hornet:

Stay tuned for the full reveal!

Finally found Waldo? Check out Hidden Folks, a game from community member Sylvain Georget

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Our community is a giant melting pot of creative designers, where 3D design is only a fraction of what the designers, makers, engineers and creators are capable of. A while back we celebrated the Academy Award nomination of Alienology, and today we want to highlight community member Sylvain Georget (visit his Shapeways shop Tegroeg), as he took his extreme detailed drawing skills to the next level by launching his own video game Hidden Folks today.

Hidden Folks is an interactive search-find-and-click game. At first, the concept might remind you of Where’s Waldo, but Hidden Folks has much more to offer. The miniature landscapes you’ll navigate through have many funny elements you can control by simply poking. Open tents, slam doors, poke crocodiles — there is so much to explore, we recommend you try it yourself. What really defines this game (besides the hilarious sound effects) are the amazing black-and-white graphics, all hand-drawn by Sylvain. Don’t let the minimalistic look of the game fool you; the world of Hidden Folks is rich in an insane amount of small but great detail — and gimmicks.

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Sylvain has been drawing miniature worlds for quite some time, and he’s translated some of them into 3D to sell in his shop Tegroeg.

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13 House by Sylvain Georget

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House 7 by Sylvain Georget

During the past years we’ve had the pleasure of collaborating with Sylvain a bunch of times, in projects for Dutch Design Week and KunstVesting Heusden, plus we printed his designs for STRP-Festival 2015, and Sylvain even attended the official Eindhoven Factory Opening event back in 2014. Seeing Sylvain use his detailed drawing skills for a whole new platform is truly inspiring.

Sylvain, congratulations to you and Adriaan de Jongh in bringing Hidden Folks to life — we can’t wait to play again!

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RC Customization Series: Lap 3 – Finalizing The Parts

In the previous Lap of the RC Customization Series you could see how Tijs prepared the 3D printed parts for assembly. We now know for sure that the parts will fit together, and that they fit on the original Tamiya Hornet body. But just connecting them to the original body will not finish our RC car — we need colors!

Tamiya 4

We quickly agreed on the colors for the car: white, black and blue. To achieve that, Tijs recommends using two different methods for finishing the parts. For some items we use the dyeing process that we offer at Shapeways. The other components will be spray-painted, and for that we need some additional tricks. Tijs is way more experienced in the spray-painting method, so we decided to split the workload.

I spoke with Lisa from our Strong & Flexibles team in Eindhoven. Lisa explains the process that we normally use at Shapeways when you order colored Strong & Flexible plastic. First, Lisa and I polish the models in giant tumblers, filled with ceramic cones. The stones will scrape off a thin layer of the products’ surface, giving them a smoother feel and also make them less sensitive for stains.

The next step for the parts is the actual coloring. For that, we put them in a pan with a solution of water and color pigment. Within a couple of minutes the exterior of the products changed color, as you can see in the video above.

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These parts have been dyed black. For black, we do not polish the parts.

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Blue Strong & Flexible is first polished. To keep the color from fading during intense use as racing with the Tamiya Hornet, Tijs also sealed the parts with a transparent varnish.

In the meantime, Tijs was busy preparing the other parts for spray painting. The surface has to be smooth, so the first thing to get rid of is the stepping, the layered pattern on products, which is an unavoidable side effect of using 3D printing for your products. Tijs first uses two types of sandpaper and then applies a primer for plastics.

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The grey area is the half treated with primer. On the white half, you can clearly see where the stepping was on this part. After some work, these will forever be hidden under a nice glossy white finish!

While I thought it looked pretty smooth after applying the first layer of primer, Tijs is not satisfied yet and decides to use a technique he calls “wet sanding,” meaning he uses wet sand paper on the parts treated with the primer. By doing so, he removes the layer of primer and smoothens the nylon plastic. The Strong & Flexible plastics can be porous, so by rinsing them with water the excess material will definitely not remain on the parts. This step is repeated a few times, and then after applying a final layer of primer, the glossy white spray paint is applied.

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The roof on the left is finished with a gloss white spray paint, while the other parts are ready for finalizing. Almost there!

So, the parts are nearly done — but we still need to assemble the car. More about that in the final Lap of the RC Customization Series, coming your way soon!

Celebrating Alienology’s Academy Award Nomination!

Sometimes, you stumble across a story that instantly needs to be shared. Yesterday evening, long-term community member Alienology announced out that he, as part of the Art Department team of the movie “Passengers” led by Production Designer Guy Hendricks Dyas, has been nominated for nothing less than an Academy Award for Best Production Design. The movie, starring Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt, tells a story of 5000 people making a 120-year long intergalactic journey — with the two main characters waking up from their hypersleep while only 1/4 of their way through the trip. An enormous starship called Avalon is their carefully (3D) designed carriage for the trip across the vast nothingness of space.

Back in 2009, Igor Knezevic joined the Shapeways community as Alienology. Over the years, he’s featured an impressive variety of futuristic designs in his shop, offering products ranging from jewelry to lamp shades. While we were already impressed by his designs, we were thrilled to learn that Igor’s design skills had made their way into Hollywood. HUGE congratulations to Igor for his work and for being recognized by the Academy! Check out more of Igor’s work below:


Recent work “Living Pods” together with Anouk Wipprecht for SOMFY. Read the full story behind this project here.

Alienology 1 Clothoid.A Lamp – Also featured in WIRED Magazine (US Edition – October 2012). Photo courtesy of Alienology.

Alienology 2 Dualnexus Bracelet. Photo courtesy of Alienology.

Alienology 3 Guilloche Necklace. Photo courtesy of Alienology.

RC Customization Series: Lap 2 — RC Engineering

Since launching the RC Customization Series last week, we’ve been super excited to see such a positive response to this Tamiya Hornet customization project! In case this is the first time you’re hearing about the Shapeways RC Customization Series, together with our RC expert Tijs and Adéla behind the camera, the three of us have set out on a journey into the world of customizing remote-controlled cars for the best look and performance.

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In the back you can see the assembled original Tamiya Hornet, in front all the parts printed in White Strong & Flexible plastic.

In the previous Lap of the series, we started with a default Tamiya Hornet and a set of 3D printed parts designed by Alberto Massarotto, better known as AMPro Engineering. But in order to use the 3D printed parts, we first need to make sure they fit on the original body of the Hornet. In this second Lap of the RC Customization Series, Tijs gives tips on how to remove the sprues, which drills you have to use to make sure the right screws fit, and how to tap the screw thread in the Strong & Flexible plastic parts without breaking them. While Tijs was busy preparing the parts for pre-assembly, I had a chat with Alberto in which he explains his design process and why he started in the first place! See how this all went Lap 2: RC Engineering in the video below.

Want to build your own AMPro Super Hornet? The list of parts we use for this car can be found here.

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After all the preparations, the parts fit nicely on the Hornet. Next step is finishing them with colors and stickers.

EDIT: Tijs did a massive update of the building with lots of close up images on our forums – read more here!

Note we release new episodes regularly, so if there’s anything you’d like to see, make sure to share that with us in the comments below and maybe we can explore that in the next Lap of the RC Customization Series.

RC Customization Series: Lap 1 – Upgrading The Tamiya Hornet

Our new RC Customization Series takes us inside a very cool Tamiya Hornet customization project, headed up by Shapeways’ Eindhoven Distribution Specialist Tijs Lochbaum and European Community Manager Ruud van den Muijzenberg. Tijs and Ruud show us how exciting (and surprisingly easy) it can be to use 3D printing to make your mark on RC racing.

Because of the global drone hype, I didn’t realize other remote-controlled vehicles were still a thing. But that was before I found out that my colleague Tijs Lochbaum, who works in our Eindhoven distribution center, is a national champion in RC car drifting!

Watch Tijs drifting with his own RC car:

Boy, was I wrong! Tijs proved to me that RC Cars are being used more than ever, in totally different ways than I expected, and that customizing them is the best way to enhance your performance in competitions. Accompanied by Tijs, I’ll deep-dive into customizing RC Cars and share the process with you via videos and blogs in our RC Customization Series. With us cruising on the first Lap of the series, we begin our journey at the beginning, showing you how we got started — and hopefully inspiring you to take on your own customization projects.

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Adéla, Tijs and I on the first recording day of this project

Of course, we need a car to begin with. RC cars have been around for decades, so Tijs recommended we start this project with a classic: the Tamiya Hornet. Watch the awesome 1980s commercial below:

After ordering the original car online, we received a box filled with components a few days later. I was expecting to get a fully operational car, so I was a bit surprised, but Tijs reassured me this is normal (yup, I’m really exploring new territory). The big advantage of getting a car in separate components is that it’s easier to replace some of the mass-manufactured items with new custom parts, while still keeping the original essence.
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The box the Tamiya Hornet arrives in. It has an appropriately vintage look.

Tijs then built the car overnight, as you can read in detail in his forum thread, to explain that there’s a lot of work involved in making the original car.

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We now have our own Tamiya Hornet assembled in its original state, even with all stickers in place. Considering that the design itself is over 30 year old, calling it a classic buggy is an understatement. But then comes the question: you can’t go wrong with a big refresh after so many years, right?

Tijs brought the AMPro Engineering store on Shapeways to my attention as one of the go-to places for new, fresh designs of Tamiya Hornet parts (and for many other RC cars too). We ordered a bunch of AMPro products that we 3D printed in our White Strong & Flexible material at our factory in Eindhoven, as you can see in the overview below. You can find a full list of the products printed here. From here, our customization journey begins!

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All parts here can be found in the AMPro Engineering shop and in the collection at this link

The designs offered by AMPro Engineering are perfect for the adjustments we have in mind, but other brilliant engineers such as James Knight from Knight Customs (read his Designer Spotlight here) offer a great digital inventory of RC car (and other RC vehicle) parts on Shapeways.

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So, now we have a car, and we have a lot of 3D printed components. The next thing we need to do is prepare the printed components for assembly — but we’ll look into that in the next Lap of the RC Customization Series. Don’t forget to shoot us questions by commenting below or on our social media channels. We’ll be adding more Laps to the series soon, and we’ll make sure to take your input into account.

Designers and Shapies Ring in the Holidays, Dutch Style

With the end of the year drawing closer, the holidays are nearly here. Last week, we felt the time was right to celebrate our Dutch designers who were true rock stars during Dutch Design Week. While unfortunately not all DDW participants were able to make it, we still had a blast and are looking forward to meeting up soon again!

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Designer Anna Ruiter of Tjielp Design shows Santa and Mrs. Claus her jewelry

Besides good food and drinks and a workshop full of Shapies on site, we were excited to once again welcome our special friends from the North Pole: Santa and his reindeer Kai! After their visit the last two years, Mrs. Claus couldn’t resist joining our early Holiday celebration as well.

Community members meet Mr. and Mrs. Santa and their reindeer

Community members meet Santa and Mrs. Claus and their reindeer

The designers had an exclusive meet and greet with our friends from the North Pole, and their designs got a thorough check to see if they’re ready to be gift-wrapped and delivered down your chimney. From all of us at Shapeways to all of you, happy holidays!

Check out the shops of all the designers featured in our holiday video:

Shapeways' Eindhoven factory team

Shapeways’ Eindhoven factory team

Recapping Eindhoven Mini Maker Faire

Last weekend Maker Faire, the Greatest Show (and Tell) event we know, descended to Eindhoven for the third time. Over 100 makers showed off their work, ranging from robots that can play football to wooden guns for rubber bands. From 3D printed selfies to jewelry handmade from electric components and organizations working on building their own maker communities.

In the Facebook video broadcast below I take you on a quick flight through the event.

Our booth was hidden in mystery. While walking by you couldn’t see much, but behind a black curtain our 3D Scanning Engineers Brigitte and Astrid scanned many visitors. One by one people could enter and for the first time see themselves from a whole different angle on the computer.

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Also a true celebrity in the fasiontech industry gave her presence at the Eindhoven Mini Maker Faire: Anouk Wipprecht. You might recognize her from cool projects such as the Spider Dress, the Audi Dresses and the Unicorn Horn. The Unicorn Horns have been 3D Printed at our Eindhoven located factory, and were on exhibit last week at ARS in Linz, Austria.

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Anouk Wipprecht is being 3D scanned by Astrid.

Despite the warm weather we had a great time 3D scanning visitors and hosting the afterparty for the makers. In special I want to thank René Paré, Maud Bongers and Anne-Marijn Burgers for organizing such a fantastic event! Eindhoven Mini Maker Faire – see you next year!

maker faire flyer

World Archery aiming for the Olympics with 3D Printing

The Olympic Games landed in Rio de Janeiro, turning Brazil into the first South American country to host the oldest sports event of all time. While welcoming many different athletes from all over the world to compete in a wide range of different sports, the Archery competition is where our gaze is specifically aiming on.

Since 1998, the World Archery is making limited edition pens out of broken arrows to give away to the VIP attendants of their competitions (learn how to make your own arrow pen here). But we can definitely agree that a special pen can’t just fly around on your desk – it has to be stored in a memorable way too.

During the 2012 Games in London, the World Archery used Cricket Balls to store the arrow-shaped pen in. While that was awesome, cricket balls have no symbolic meaning in Rio de Janeiro. This years’ Archery Olympics competition took place at the impressive Sambódromo, which you might recognize as the ending point of the yearly Rio Carnival, and definitely is one of the first places that comes to mind when thinking about Rio de Janeiro.

The Arrow Pen would not be complete without a symbol to remind the games in Rio, and what other material than our 3D printed Porcelain could represent the concrete arch better? The result is stunning, yet elegant.

The Sambódromo is a huge purpose-built area for the yearly Rio Carnival, but during the 2016 Olympics used for the Archery and Athletics Marathon events for the Olympics and for Archery in the 2016 Paralympics. Photo is courtesy of World Archery.

The Sambódromo is a huge purpose-built area for the yearly Rio Carnival, but used for the Archery and Athletics Marathon events for the 2016 Olympics and for Archery event in the 2016 Paralympics. Photo is courtesy of World Archery. Please note the Sambódromo Pen Holder is a gift from World Archery to a selected group of attendees and not part of Rio 2016.

By collaborating intensively with the World Archery and their 3D designer, we went through a few iterations to get a printable design and archieve the best details possible. Since we knew we had a very short time to print all the penholder statues, we worked intensively in speeding up our Porcelain printing process. This resulted in a lead time reduction of 50%! Read more about that and some tips for designing 3D Printed Porcelain in our previous blog.

What Happened on Alpe d’Huez Last Month?

A few weeks ago we announced our collaboration with Marjolein and team as they embarked on their challenge of climbing the Alpe d’Huez.  We’d like to share few snapshots from the event, which took place in June, and tell you a little more about how those involved made it happen by charting unfamiliar territory and uniting through a shared sense of purpose.

Team WilMarion

From left to right: Thijs, Imma, Jos, Marion, Marjolein, Lucien.

So what happened exactly? Marjolein tells a bit how she is experiencing the ride:

And catch a full recap of the ride here:

The outcome?  The entire team raised over € 18,000, and the six of them in total climbed the Alpe d’Huez an impressive 16 times!  If you watch the video carefully,  you can see the entire team is carrying two specific Ribbon shaped accessories with them. The items were designed for Marjolein and her team to show our solidarity in their cause against cancer. While the items were made exclusively for this event, you can own them too to support the cause! The Ribbon Pin and the Ribbon Bottlecage can be bought in our Shapeways Ribbons shop through the end of July. Per sale € 5,- will be donated to Pink Ribbon to support their research on breast cancer.

Ribbon Pin

Ribbon Bottlecage

A list of all 3D Printed products used during the event at Alpe d’Huez can be found here.

Designer Spotlight: Leon Oudehand

This week we’re speaking with Leon Oudehand from the Netherlands, who did a great job developing a simple yet useful life hack!

Leon Oudehand

Tell us a little bit about yourself: Who are you? Where are you located?
Hi, I’m Leon and I’m a product and packaging developer from the Netherlands. I work as packaging designer for a big FMCG company, but alongside that I love to design and create products that make life just a little easier, both for myself and for others.

What’s the story behind your designs? What inspires you?
I guess this is one of those typical “I had a need and couldn’t find the right product so decided to do it myself” stories where a product originates from a pure personal need. When the explosion of wallet projects on Kickstarter started a couple of years ago, I too got a little addicted to the minimal wallet trend.

Cavity Card

Typically, minimal wallets are great for cards and bills. However, few offer a “good” solution for carrying coins (or other small items). I tried going “cashless” or at least “coinless” for a while, but found that there’s still quite a few places that don’t accept cards, or don’t accept cards for small amounts. Time after time I ended up with loose coins in my pocket. After finding over 10 euros worth of coins in the washing machine, and another stash spread around the car, I decided I had to find a solution.

That’s when I came up with Cavity Card. A simple and light frame that can be mounted onto any card and creates just a little space for a few coins, a key or an SD card while keeping my wallet slim. At first, I just printed one for myself. But after a number of questions from friends and colleagues, I decided to open up a shop.

Wallets with cavity card

What brought you to 3D printing with Shapeways?
I learned about 3D printing as a tool for rapid prototyping in my job as a packaging designer. It’s been a great tool for very quickly getting something physical in your hands, which is great for very early stage tests and design evaluation.

Having studied in Eindhoven, Shapeways was the logical choice for me. A while ago I did a bit of a benchmark comparing it with a couple of other 3D printing services but found Shapeways still has the best balance between cost, range of materials and service.

How did you learn how to design in 3D?
I’m schooled as an industrial designer. So I learned 3D modeling at university. I’ve experimented with a couple of CAD solutions, but find SolidWorks to be the best fit for me.

How do you promote your work?
For a very niche product like Cavity Card, which is only relevant to people owning a minimal wallet, it’s difficult to reach the right people. I currently mainly use Instagram and Facebook to try to build a following. I’ve also been experimenting a bit with Facebook ads (although not too successfully yet).

Next to my Shapeways store, I also run an independent website where I sell Cavity Cards with self-adhesive strips and a backing card included packed in a nice minimal pack.


If you weren’t limited by current technologies, what would you want to make using 3D printing?
I’ve got plenty of ideas in my head that I’d like to work out and start making some day. I’ve got a couple of wallet concepts for which the limitations in size and accuracy currently limit me from producing it through 3D printing. I’d love to start printing more complex multipart products that offer more functionality. Multi-material parts (printed in one go) would also open up so many opportunities.

Who are your favorite designers or artists? Who in the Shapeways community has served as an inspiration to you?
In terms of design, I’m a fan of classic modernist designers like Mies van der Rohe or Eames. My favorite Shapeways designer is probably Remi van Oers, because of his very simple and minimal but super useful designs.

Anything else you’d like to share with us?
Just that it’s absolutely fantastic how simple and easy it is to go from a one-off print for personal use to selling them commercially. And a big thanks to you guys for providing the services!

Hacking Your Home With 3D Printing

Why should your house look the same as the one next door? Home is where the heart is, right? And creativity comes from the heart. So a home that breathes your creativity is what makes it your home.

With 3D Printing, it becomes easier than ever to hack existing items you have in your house to create a dynamic space, a place that changes, grows and is really you. Last week we got an email from Evan Gant, who has his own shop on Shapeways called Olivebird and created a range of products that show how easy it becomes to manipulate your own environment.

Take these brilliant small components called “Links” that you can attach to your wall and create a whole new dimension for using building blocks. While it provides a fun way for your kid to decorate the wall their bedrooms (obviously preferred above using crayons on the wall), you can also create fun looking and yet functional storage spaces with these Links.

What never fails to liven up your home is.. Life! With this clever Bell Vase hack you can reuse the jars from your favorite food by simply adding a 3D printed lid to transform them into vases. Designer izign believes in sustainable design, so I’m curious to see what other life extending hacks he comes up with.

With summer drawing near, I can imagine you’re ready to start using your ceiling fan any time soon. But don’t you just hate the moment pulling on the wrong cord and having the light go on in stead? Noé and Pedro Ruiz (design duo Pixil 3D) decided they needed a simple solution, which resulted in the Typography Fan Pull Handles.

Last example I want to give really turned the world of Home Deco upside down. This Radiolaria Vertebralia Planter is a cool design by Joaquin Baldwin that shows plants from a whole new dimension in your home.

Need even more cool ideas to hack your house with 3D Printing? Browse this list of products and get inspired!

How To Guarantee A Perfect Fit For Your 3D Printed Pebble Accessories

Considering the vast amount of new accessory designs we receive at Shapeways for smartphones, Apple Watches, FitBit products and Pebble, it’s safe to say wearable technology is taking the world by storm. Like most traditional businesses, these companies are often keen to make their own accessories for their products. Offering a set of accessories is great as they enable different functionalities for the base product, but they can also be limiting. With only a few options to choose from, products do not become personal. They don’t showcase individuality, or why that product was bought in first place.

A while back Pebble shared a Reddit post of a Pebble Round customized with a non-official wristband on their own social channels. Is this showing how a big brand is embracing customization of their products?

A while back Pebble shared a Reddit post of a Pebble Round customized with a non-official wristband on their own social channels. Is this showing how a big brand is embracing customization of their products?

As we at Shapeways know well, mass manufacturing does not deliver on our desire for personal products. From bumpers that can be personalized using our CustomMaker, to affordable watch stands for easy smartwatch charging, to mounts for connecting your smartwatch to your bike (photos at end of post), we’ve seen a lot of accessories at Shapeways that really tap into that demand for giving an identity to your wearable tech. The bigger question in this growing demand for custom objects is: how to do it without going through multiple prototypes to test it out?

In the case of Pebble, they did a great job making their CAD files available on GitHub. This enables you as a designer to use a virtual Pebble Watch to design your accessory around, making sure you can keep an eye on the right tolerances and guarantee that your and your customers’ Pebble Watches have a perfect fit with your accessory.

Seeing Pebble open up their product to their community and encouraging them to customize it really shows how a company values the personal experience of their users without fear of losing territory. On the contrary, I believe this will give new users a broader perspective on how to implement the product into their lifestyle and customize it to their personality, thereby increasing the demand for the base product. While there still is a lot of ground to be gained on the customization front, I consider this a small victory in making the products and objects you love to be really you.

Celebrating 125 Years of Philips – a live demo of the 3D Shaver!

As you might have read in our blog about the 3D Shaver a couple of weeks ago, we share a close relationship with Philips. Last weekend, Philips celebrated their 125th (!!) anniversary in the place where it all started for them over a century ago, and also our homebase in The Netherlands; Eindhoven.

3D Shaver 4 Colors (712 version)

Last week I already had the honor of unpacking a personalized 3D Shaver, as you can see in the video below. To my surprise, Philips already personalized it with my name on it!

After receiving a personalized shaver, I couldn’t refuse the request to do a proof of concept during the event. So during one of the busiest moments of the event, I gave a live demo of the 3D Shaver and my beard (unfortunately) had to go. You can view the full video of the shaving demo here.

3dprazor-1

Want to order a personalized 3D Shaver for yourself or as a Father’s Day present? At this time they are exclusively available in The Netherlands via www.3dshaver.com with only a limited 125 shavers being produced, so don’t hesitate too long and start personalizing!

DIT is een Drone Race – The Recap

Last weekend Eindhoven was celebrating the future. The entire Strijp-S area (former Philips factories & offices) was taken over by cool and creative activities, all coordinated by DIT (Do It Together). We had the pleasure of partnering with Formula FPV, MONK bouldergym and Drone Zone Breda in an activity with adrenaline involved: DIT is een Drone Race.

 

So, why all the excitement about Drone Racing for Shapeways? First of all, with 3D printing it becomes super easy to optimize your drone’s design for better performance during the race. But as you can see in the video below of the live broadcast of the event, drones crash. So you need to make new spare parts. And that’s where 3D printing truly kicks in.

Flying a drone in First Person View (FPV), does something special with you. The sensation of flying through your direct environment, the thrill of the race, the obstacles you pass through… The adrenalin rushing through your blood to help you respond quick enough to prevent your drone from crashing. The only element missing to get into the zone, is music. We’re thrilled to share our specially curated Drone Racing playlist on Spotify – be sure to follow Shapeways Crew to find regular updated playlists.

The event was great, a big shout out to MONK bouldergym, Gerard de Vries from Formula FPV, the drone racers from Drone Zone Breda and in special Siem Nozza, Niki van Rooij and Anne-Marijn Burgers from DIT – we’re looking forward to work with all of you soon!

DIT is Drone Racing