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Shapeways: metal 3D printing in Titanium contest

Shapeways
will be holding a metal 3D printing contest from today until the 15th
of January. The winning entry will win his(or her) own model printed
out in Titanium.

To start
off: Wow! Can we really 3D print metal just like we do with White
Strong and Flexible now? Well, yes
and no. 3D printing in metal (or
direct metal printing) is not as accessible a technology as the
regular 3D printing technologies that we use at Shapeways at the moment.
The material that is used is also more
expensive, because it is a
Titanium alloy. The machines and the process itself are much more
expensive also. Just how expensive? To give you an indication: we
estimate that the contest winners prize(which can be 10 cubic
centimeters)will cost us around $1000 to $2000 depending on its size!
To top it all off there are design rules that you will have to follow
when designing for 3D metal printing. Check out the half scale Light Poem in Titanium to the right. 

We are
not offering metal as a material right now; however this is a unique
opportunity: your unique object 3D printed in titanium. As far as we
know you will be amongst the first people ever to be able to have
your own personal design made and then 3D printed in titanium. There
are some companies out there using the technology, but even their
usage is rather limited and direct access to these machines? Unheard
of!

If
you’re interested in entering in the contest or want to know more
about Direct Metal Laser Sintering(aka Metal Laser Sintering or Metal
3D printing) you can go to our special contest page here.

As
you’ve probably heard by now this contest will not be a walk in the
park. It is by far our most challenging contest so far but then again
it is not every day you get to win something that no one has ever won
before. Good luck!

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