Quaturnery Qube (hollow)

by richgain
Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles Four pieces
Four pieces
Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles Four pieces
Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles Four pieces
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Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles End on
Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles End on
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Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles Corner view
Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles Corner view
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Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles Close-up
Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles Close-up
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Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles
Quaturnery Qube (hollow) 3d printed Art Puzzles
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  • White Strong & Flexible

    White nylon plastic with a matte finish and slight grainy feel.

    $22.90
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My fourth 4x4x4 cube puzzle design is 4cm wide, with four pieces and a unique solution that includes rotation (hence the punny name).

This is a brand new concept for me. Cost-conscious, as ever, I have tried to create a puzzle cube consisting of hollow cubelets. To make the shapes more interesting I have designed my basic Curly Corner Cube in TopMod and then constructed the puzzle pieces from alternating left- and right-handed unit cubes in Blender.
This means it is possible to create a much larger puzzle without it being too expensive.

Another innovation of the design is the flexibility of the cube pieces (when printed in White Strong & Flexible material). The springiness of the Curly Corner Cube shape means that the puzzle pieces should always fit snugly together without being too loose or too tight.


Dimensions

IN: 3.937 w x 3.937 d x 1.575 h
CM: 10 w x 10 d x 4 h
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Cool! It looks like there is no place where a cube must fit between two cubes in another piece, right? This is what I always look for ...
October 4, 2010, 4:34 am
No need for sanding. The springy solution worked perfectly!
October 2, 2010, 4:44 pm
You can always sand a piece if it doesn't fit! Most of my sphere puzzles have zero offset, but spheres are different! I always use 0.05mm to 0.1mm offset for cubes.
September 29, 2010, 5:34 pm
That's exactly what I'm testing George. If I'm wrong and it's too tight with a zero offset, at least I'll have a more ornate collection of scrap pieces. But I'm really hoping that the flexibility of the material and the fact that there are no straight connections between the corners of each cubelet will provide enough springiness to make the whole thing fit together. Whether I can then take it apart again is a different question, of course!
September 29, 2010, 6:12 am
Looks cool! I think you will need an offset whenever you have a cube that must fit between two cubes on another piece.
September 28, 2010, 11:33 pm
 
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