Home » Support » 3D Design » Sliding Panels: Tolerances?
Search Search  
Show: Today's Messages    Show Polls    Message Navigator
Sliding Panels: Tolerances? [message #77507] Thu, 24 October 2013 18:38 UTC Go to next message
avatar GInSpace76  is currently offline GInSpace76
Messages: 34
Registered: November 2008
Go to my shop
Member
I'm working on my first Shapeways-printable model. A key feature of the model will be twin panels that slide open within a larger frame. Imagine cutting a roughly rectangular doorway into the side of a cone and working Star Trek-style sliding doors into the opening. That's fairly close to what I'm working on.

To make a model like this, I imagine needing to build it from at least five parts:
1x "outer wall" (a cone)
1x "inner wall" (a smaller cone that will fit inside the "outer wall" cone)
2x doors (two appropriately shaped panels that can fit and slide circumferentially within the cone-shaped gap between the nested outer wall and inner wall cones)
1x base (circular plate for the "wall" parts to attach to -- and to keep the door panels from potentially falling out of the bottom)

Does anyone have recommendations on how much of a "gap" I should leave between the "wall" part's outer and inner cylinders, so that the the door pieces will function but without excessive wiggle room? I'm not up to speed on stuff like mechanical tolerances.

I plan to use White, Strong & Flexible material. The outermost cone will be about 7 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length. I'd like both the outer wall thickness and door thickness to be about 2mm.

Thanks in advance!
Re: Sliding Panels: Tolerances? [message #77509 is a reply to message #77507 ] Thu, 24 October 2013 18:48 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Youknowwho4eva  is currently offline Youknowwho4eva
Messages: 5583
Registered: September 2008
Go to my shop
Shapie Expert
I work here
On the design guidelines page it lists the minimum clearance as .5mm.
So if you're printing it assembled, that will prevent fusion. It still may get some trapped powder in there that you may have to clean out to make it operational.
If you're printing it to be assembled, the tolerance is listed at ± 0.15mm, then ± 0.15% of longest axis. So find your tolerance, and allow for twice the tolerance plus some wiggle room for separation. If you're printing pieces in the same file, they should have relativity close variances, but different orientations can lead to different variances.


I learned a long time ago the wisest thing I can do is be on my own side, be an advocate for myself and others like me. -Maya Angelou
michael@shapeways.com Community Advocate
Re: Sliding Panels: Tolerances? [message #77518 is a reply to message #77507 ] Thu, 24 October 2013 19:43 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar FreeRangeBrain  is currently offline FreeRangeBrain
Messages: 234
Registered: April 2013
Go to my shop
Senior Member
It looks like you're planning to print in a dissassembled state, which enables much closer tolerances than the stated gap limit. Expect the parts to have approximately 0.005" (0.13mm) of "surface texture" beyond they modelled dimension - if it's 0.125" thick as a model in the software, it'll be more like 0.135" thick as a printed piece, and then add the manufacturing tolerance on top. That extra 0.005" can and will wear off fairly quickly in operation, if sufficient force and repetition is possible, so don't be surprised if it gets a bit looser over time. Beyond that, I'd say have a peek at Machinery's Handbook regarding sliding fits and tolerances. The numbers are usually given per inch of size (diameter), and Machinery's is intended for... well... machining, but the principles are the same. If you make the door a little thicker than the minimum wall specification, you'll have some room to thin it out on a second print if the first is too tight. (Been there, done that, tee shirt on order.)


Creativity - sometimes by the brute force method.
Re: Sliding Panels: Tolerances? [message #77521 is a reply to message #77518 ] Thu, 24 October 2013 19:52 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar GInSpace76  is currently offline GInSpace76
Messages: 34
Registered: November 2008
Go to my shop
Member
Thanks for the replies. Before reading them I didn't even realize that Shapeways could print multi-part models in an assembled state.

I'll probably still print in a disassembled state, so that subsequent painting, etc. would (hopefully) be easier, but it's good to know that there are other options.

Thanks again!
Re: Sliding Panels: Tolerances? [message #77522 is a reply to message #77521 ] Thu, 24 October 2013 20:25 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar FreeRangeBrain  is currently offline FreeRangeBrain
Messages: 234
Registered: April 2013
Go to my shop
Senior Member
Don't forget you can print them in a nearly assembled state - multiple parts per file*. It makes ordering a WHOLE lot easier!

* varies by material

[Updated on: Thu, 24 October 2013 20:26 UTC]


Creativity - sometimes by the brute force method.
Re: Sliding Panels: Tolerances? [message #77523 is a reply to message #77522 ] Thu, 24 October 2013 20:34 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar GInSpace76  is currently offline GInSpace76
Messages: 34
Registered: November 2008
Go to my shop
Member
I didn't know that either. Thanks for the info! Do the multiple parts in the file need to be connected in some way, like with "sprue" from a traditional model kit, or can they be disconnected?
Re: Sliding Panels: Tolerances? [message #77525 is a reply to message #77523 ] Thu, 24 October 2013 20:45 UTC Go to previous message
avatar mkroeker  is currently offline mkroeker
Messages: 1949
Registered: June 2012
Go to all my models
Shapie Expert
Depends on how many and how small they are - somebody has to pick them from the heap of loose powder etc. (Watch one of the production videos to get an idea of the process, if you have not already done so)

 
   
Previous Topic:Understanding the Minimum Wall/Wire Criteria
Next Topic:How Dense Should a Curvy Mesh Be in Order to Avoid a Faceted Look?

Logo

Hello.

We're sorry to inform you that we no longer support this browser and can't confirm that everything will work as expected. For the best Shapeways experience, please use one of the following browsers:

Click anywhere outside this window to continue.