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Metal Jewelery Tests [message #5974] Fri, 21 August 2009 04:50 UTC Go to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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I got a bunch of metal jewelry bits back today. Let's start with the stuff that Shapeways made directly with Steel:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2662/3841873140_57f54f2041.jpg

This a group of pictures of the Crone Pendant and the Dragon's Head Pendant, both printed through Shapeways. They are rough, but still look very good. And the price certainly makes up rough look.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3583/3841873782_a0372b0052.jpg

This is a my Ring of Souls, printed through a company called Pro Metal. I got rather impatient with the delays in testing my parts for Steel printing, so I ordered this from another company. I had hoped they had higher resolution technology, but they did not. This cost me $100, and looks the same as a $27 would have looked through Shapeways. It took them just as long to do as well, at about 3 weeks.

I'm currently looking into a super-high rez wax print using the Solidscape printers I mentioned in another forum post. When I see those results, I'll share them. If it turns out well, maybe Shapeways will consider adding a Solidscape machine to their inventory. Considering the improvement in detail and smoothness, maybe Silver casting might come back to Shapeways as well!

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2559/3841080607_2c7a8867db.jpg

This image will interest those of you interested in casting the most. This is the 1st of 3 items I had printed in Transparent Detail by Shapeways, and then had a Jeweler cast in Silver.

According to the Jeweler, he was able to pour the plaster directly around the plastic and burn out the plastic directly without created a Wax mold first and then casting from that. The downside is the very poor resolution of the print, coupled with the rough nature of the material, helped create alot of bubbles in the plaster. I think all of the lines didn't help either. The result was alot of damage to the pattern.

I'm hoping they can get around the bubble issue with a few more test prints. The nature of the ring should make a rough material it's made from a non-issue, because the jeweler is basically sanding off the top edge to make the pattern shine, well the lower recesses should be dark and less visible.

The other 2 objects turned out very well and the Jeweler used them to make molds that will allow more copies to be made in the future. I'm going to update the items in my Shapeways store with pictures and comments to indicate that they can buy Silver versions from me directly.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #5975 is a reply to message #5974 ] Fri, 21 August 2009 05:08 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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I won't have better pictures until tomorrow, but here's some fuzzy pictures of the other two items I had caste in Silver.

This is the Hand Ring holding the Star Sapphire:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3457/3842011578_20e69b64b0.jpg

This is the Crone Pendant, with and without the Star Sapphire eyes set in it:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3525/3842011598_f273d48052.jpg
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #5980 is a reply to message #5975 ] Fri, 21 August 2009 11:52 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar joris  is currently offline joris
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So far which technology to you gives you the best looking jewelery?

And if you compare the prices which one is best for you?

Joris
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #5981 is a reply to message #5974 ] Fri, 21 August 2009 12:39 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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Right now my ability to produce detailed pieces seems questionable, as I don't have the resolution necessary for small pieces. I'm hoping the Wax Solidscape printer will fix that, but since I haven't seen the wax print yet, it's hard to tell.

The best solution would be if Shapeways both had high resolution wax printers, as well as casting. The fine detail should allow for smoother prints without excessive hand polishing. Of course, I won't get to test that theory until I've had the Solidscape wax caste in silver.

Right now Shapeways metal prints are certainly the most affordable, but the roughness and fragility during the "green" phase greatly limits what I can do with them.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6013 is a reply to message #5981 ] Sun, 23 August 2009 01:24 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stannum  is currently offline stannum
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Any clue about Envisiontec WIC100? That was the other system mentioned at the same time than the (brittle) Solidscape one. I'm following all your experiments with attention as I'm interested in similar output quality than jewelery, but "shippable" (wax doesn't sound very compatible with that) and even better if usable as is (think plastic like results).
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6014 is a reply to message #5974 ] Sun, 23 August 2009 03:02 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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The Solidscape wax hasn't arrived yet, but a small ring floating around inside a large box will most likely arrive intact. I'll post the results and pictures as soon as the wax arrives, as well as when it's cast, if all goes well. I got my fingers crossed!
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6848 is a reply to message #5974 ] Sun, 27 September 2009 12:51 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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I just got back the casting done with the Solidscape Wax print. The SolidScape prints product models 5,000 by 5,000 dpi (25 Million dots for ever 1" layer), so they are extremely more detailed then the processes currently offered by Shapeways.

Compare these shots of the Ring of Souls compared to the Shapeways current metal printed version show above:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3497/3958762538_a5d3d78af0.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2432/3958762656_74651daf90.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3513/3957988451_e45d81d24d.jpg

The Wax print was shipped to me in a simple cotton lined ring box, inside of a bubble padded envelope, and arrived with no damage. There's no reason Shapeways couldn't make these kind of prints available to us. They are every bit as durable as transparent plastic, and have similar melting points. But the level of detail with the Solidscape print is UNREAL.

When casting in silver, there is no better way currently available to print a small design.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6855 is a reply to message #6848 ] Sun, 27 September 2009 19:46 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stannum  is currently offline stannum
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Pretty good indeed. In their FAQ they say the melting points are 95-110C for one of their materials and 49-70 for the other. A data sheet in third party site gives a slight higher temp of 105-115C (older formula?) and with some extra investigation it seems the low temperature one is just for support. High temp one would do great for scale miniatures with this detail level and based in your description of "plastic" (vs "brittle" in other thread).

[Updated on: Sun, 27 September 2009 23:55 UTC]

Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6856 is a reply to message #6848 ] Sun, 27 September 2009 23:13 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar tanix  is currently offline tanix
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Hey, what did it cost you to output your ring on the Solidscape machine? I'd really love to see Shapeways offer that as an option.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6857 is a reply to message #5974 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 00:46 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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What I paid for that wax print was criminal, $100. I'd have to imagine Shapeways could do it for much less.

On top of that, I paid another $120 for the casting, which took 4 weeks to complete. So that ring there is quite an expensive bit of jewelery.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6858 is a reply to message #6857 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 01:40 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Whystler  is currently offline Whystler
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Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6866 is a reply to message #6857 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 12:53 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar tanix  is currently offline tanix
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Yeah, I'm sure Shapeways could do it much more efficiently and cheaper. Here's hoping that they do so soon!

Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6869 is a reply to message #5974 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 13:48 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar tree  is currently offline tree
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althoguht if you where making more than one of them you could use the wax print to make a mold for more waxes to be cast so that those new waxes can be used to cast th silver.

not actualy that hard to do at home with an oven and blowtorch.

time line:

get wax print
make silicone mold of wax print
use mold to cast new wax
add sprews to wax cast
cast ring and sprews in good plaster
slowly heat cast in overn
mealt silver in porceline/terricotta with blowtorch.
take hot cast out of overn (should be VERRY hot)
pour silver into sprew hole till it comes out of vent hole
leave to cool over night
gently chip away most of plaster
clean ring with tothbrush and water
polish/destress as desired


(ive been dooing my reserch, and silver isnt actualy that expencive to buy for casting, both fine[999] and sterling[925])

[Updated on: Mon, 28 September 2009 13:48 UTC]

Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6871 is a reply to message #5974 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 15:14 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Youknowwho4eva  is currently offline Youknowwho4eva
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The problem with casting such a detailed and complex item is that your mold for the wax would have to be many pieces. And the inside would be really hard, as you would have to be able to pull the inside in before extracting the cast to not damage the wax.


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Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6887 is a reply to message #6871 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 18:49 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Whystler  is currently offline Whystler
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Usually wax molds are made of flexible rubber so they can include mildly undercut elements of design, and exist in few pieces.

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Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6888 is a reply to message #6887 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 19:20 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Whystler wrote on Mon, 28 September 2009 18:49

Usually wax molds are made of flexible rubber so they can include mildly undercut elements of design, and exist in few pieces.

-Whystler


whystler is correct, hence me saying make the mold out of Silicone.

and also casting wax is realy quite strong. so removing it from the mold shouldnt be an issue
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6890 is a reply to message #5974 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 21:41 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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The jeweler that did the casting has done molds of all of my things, in case I need copies. He used Vulcanized Rubber, which melts the original. I'm certain it's the best, as he is very knowledgeable.

In the case of the Ring of Souls though, the process of making the waxes has proved impossible with his current tools. Too many overhangs. He says it can be done, but he'd need a vacuum device to get all of the wax into the crevices. This is something he currently does not possess.

Joris says that he's certainly open to adding Solidscape wax printing, but others in the company are not. If you guys want high-rez wax prints, and think you can handle the casting yourself, please let everybody at Shapeways know.

Thus far, Shapeways has concentrated on making finished items that are immediately useful. It goes a bit contrary to their company policy to make something that you, the end consumer, has to take to somebody else to have finished. We have to let them know we want this, or it's not likely to happen.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6892 is a reply to message #5974 ] Mon, 28 September 2009 21:58 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Whystler  is currently offline Whystler
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Hey Max,

This might belong here. If there is a better place, let me know, but ...

To be truthful, there are materials I would prefer over high detail wax. I do want something that is finished - that I can ship directly from shapeways to the consumer and not have to dirty my hands with contracting a silversmith.

I have a feeling a lot of folks who use Shapeways would rather make a print here and have it done with, than have to contract out or even do post processing of their own.

Certainly, I would prefer to see a higher detail material that is "finished" and go directly to the consumer long before I would want to see wax prints here at Shapeways. At least then you can can order the higher detail print, make a mold, cast a wax piece for lost wax metal casting. Or maybe this high detail material could be burnt out instead of the wax as someone else experimented.

Don't get me wrong, I love metal. I just prefer to design using the restrictions of the current material rather than incur the cost and fuss of adding more steps by contracting a metalsmith.

-Whystler


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Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6905 is a reply to message #5974 ] Tue, 29 September 2009 18:05 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
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i sort of agree,

but if i could choose 2 new materials, i would go for a more fine grane detail intencive material. next would be the wax for post work



something that might be worth trying for your soul ring......the new smooth material, but the minium $23 is a bit :S for it i guess.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6910 is a reply to message #5974 ] Tue, 29 September 2009 20:57 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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You should look at the Smooth material spec again. It has less detail then WSF or Transparent, not more.

There are no options available through Shapeways that are even close to the detail Solidscape offers. Wax isn't my first choice of materials, but when it's a choice between Wax or fuzzy, "Tree like" prints, obviously wax is the best choice. The added cost of casting myself is just the price of getting the perfect print.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6912 is a reply to message #5974 ] Tue, 29 September 2009 21:37 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
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is solid scape the name of the machine or the company?

as if its the machine, dose it work with other materials than just wax? as maybe that would be more likly to get shaways intersted?

if the same materials where available in that details i would love it.


good point on the smooth material, but it wouldnt have the layers so might look realy nice with your ring in a more gaseious finish
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6915 is a reply to message #6912 ] Tue, 29 September 2009 22:08 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stannum  is currently offline stannum
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Solid scape is the company that makes the machines. It seems they have only two materials InduraCast for jewelry and mechanical jobs and DentaCast for dental ones (and InduraFill as common support), a Sulfonamide Thermoplastic in both cases, with pretty similar values, so probably small variations in formula to accomodate the differences between dental parts and the rest of uses.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6938 is a reply to message #6892 ] Wed, 30 September 2009 20:47 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar tanix  is currently offline tanix
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I'd certainly be open to a more high-res finished material, but I haven't seen anything that even comes close to the resolution of the Solidscape stuff in wax. Now, for me, the material itself is almost secondary because I'm an amateur metal smith and will likely be using the items as masters for casting anyway.

Wax will, in some cases, save me a step.

I also have done a fair amount of RTV Silicone casting, so I'm familiar with that technology as well.

I understand the reluctance on Shapeways' part to embrace the wax printers if the company is all about producing finished parts, but really it's a natural thing for them. It's the exact same business process as their other printers. Really, they shouldn't care what material is being printed. Perhaps I want to design my own candles using the Solidscape printers, which would make wax a "finished" material. (OK, I'm stretching a bit there... that would be one expensive candle Smile

Anyway, I'd LOVE to see Shapeways embrace high resolution wax printing, and would almost certainly give them plenty of business.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6940 is a reply to message #6938 ] Wed, 30 September 2009 22:08 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar akeno  is currently offline akeno
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would love to see a solidscape wax machine. opportunities would be priceless. more options = more people = more publicity
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6977 is a reply to message #6938 ] Thu, 01 October 2009 20:16 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stannum  is currently offline stannum
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The Envisiontecs are also an option (other thread had photos of WIC100 material, used for rings like Solidscape, but they allow more than just one material). Now, about "finished objects", some people is currently making "requires post processing" models to protect the models or make sure all parts ship, and the target market is used to that. I'm talking about sprues and resin/white metal/plastic models.

For jewelry it wouldn't be a solution, but for other things where cleaning, assembling and painting will happen anyway, "raw" Envisiontec output would be perfectly acceptable if it means custom parts at affordable prices in similar material to what people is already used to. So would be Solidscape output before any metal casting, I just want to remember the other brand because it seems their machines can use more than one material, so more versatile.

So I guess there are two targets: high detail jewelry, ready to wear, and detailed and resistant scale kits for hobbists. They both share the detail requirement, but then start to differ in what is needed, one can be shipped "dirty" but material has to be "strong", while the other requires more steps and material doesn't have to be as "strong" as it will be an intermediate step that will be discarded.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #6979 is a reply to message #5974 ] Thu, 01 October 2009 21:17 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar rawkstar320  is currently offline rawkstar320
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i would definitely utilize a wax print. Im currently working on an engagement/wedding ring set for the girlfriend and wax printing would be really nice. Ive been printing in various other materials, but it would be nice to have a really high detail print that was ready to cast.


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Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #8456 is a reply to message #5974 ] Sun, 20 December 2009 21:19 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar lensman  is currently offline lensman
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Since we have a sort of mini-poll going here - although a bit old - I would like to throw my vote in for Shapeways producing wax prints also. I'm no metalsmith but I would love to take a wax print to my local jewellers and say "Here, make me this" !


Glenn ------ My Website Third Dimension Jewellery
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #8486 is a reply to message #8456 ] Mon, 21 December 2009 22:00 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar chris3d  is currently offline chris3d
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some of the questions raised in this thread made me think of Hydrospan / Hydroshrink materials.
You can use it to create "shrinkable" moulds from a master object to get more detail.
You could get a large model printed at shapeways, make a 50% reduction mould from it, use that to cast a wax copy - double your detail...

It's available here:
http://www.mutr.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=418_467&pro ducts_id=1009669
They do an expanding and a contracting version.
Beware of MUTR though - If you like rapid prototyping you are likely to want everything they sell!!
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #8958 is a reply to message #5974 ] Thu, 14 January 2010 12:38 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
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MaxSMoke777 wrote on Fri, 21 August 2009 04:50

According to the Jeweler, he was able to pour the plaster directly around the plastic and burn out the plastic directly without created a Wax mold first and then casting from that. The downside is the very poor resolution of the print, coupled with the rough nature of the material, helped create alot of bubbles in the plaster. I think all of the lines didn't help either. The result was alot of damage to the pattern.

I'm hoping they can get around the bubble issue with a few more test prints.


I don't know much about making molds for lost wax casting, so there may be special considerations I'm unaware of, but from my own experience with plaster, that's a basic technique fix that has nothing really to do with the pattern.

For something with a detailed & textured surface like that, I'd never ever rely on pouring alone to create a mold. I'd brush a lay-up coat on before pouring to ensure there were no bubbles, and If the surface was really textured (like with these materials), I'd douse it with a wetting agent first to be extra sure. Even looking at the finished ring, I can tell the relief alone without texture would be a bubble trap & not something I'd want to just pour plaster around straight.

I'm tempted to say a professional like your jeweler should know better (this is really basic stuff), but like I say, I have no lost wax experience, so there may be good reasons why he's not doing this. It's worth asking him about though IMO. Respectfully, of course.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #8960 is a reply to message #5974 ] Thu, 14 January 2010 13:33 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar mnpazan  is currently offline mnpazan
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Re: vacuum casting setups- This isn't that hard to arrange. For something small like rings, you can put together a vacuum casting setup for around $100.

Vacuum pump

Vacuum bell jar (you can likely get these cheaper, this is just the one I knew of off the top of my head)

You can get bigger and fancier than that, of course (higher CFM pumps, larger canister-type vac chambers), but those'll do the job for small runs. What you said about your jeweler preferring vulcanized rubber molds makes me think he's using the large run production equipment he has on hand to make your one-off prototypes. In a way that's good, because it lays the proof of concept groundwork for if you decide to go into large run production, but it can also be uneconomical and technically limiting if you're looking to do prototyping or limited runs instead.

If you can't find a really cheap wax printing service, building or funding a vacuum casting setup for you or your Jeweler will pay for itself rather quickly.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #10104 is a reply to message #6848 ] Mon, 22 February 2010 10:28 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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I didn't buy that ring, I made it. That high-rez silver version is the only one of it's kind in existence.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #10126 is a reply to message #10104 ] Tue, 23 February 2010 08:47 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar akeno  is currently offline akeno
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max what company did you use to get your wax ring printed at? I'm having a hard time finding a place thats reputable and would like your opinion and recommendation now that I saw your piece on here.

[Updated on: Tue, 23 February 2010 08:48 UTC]

Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #10139 is a reply to message #10126 ] Tue, 23 February 2010 14:18 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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I had my blue wax print made through Esslinger, but from what I can see, they no longer advertise their printing service. They might have given up on it entirely due to labor requirements. The company specializes in selling products, not services, so it might have been a strain on them. I'm not too sure where to get a print made now, but here's Esslinger's URL. Maybe they'll do it for you if you ask them.

http://www.esslinger.com/solidscaperapidprototype.aspx

It took about a month for them to make my ring, at the cost of $100. But the man I talked to said any more rings would cost more like $120 to $150. I hope, whatever you make, justifies those high costs. Until Shapeways adds Solidscape machines, it's unavoidable.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #10160 is a reply to message #10139 ] Tue, 23 February 2010 21:06 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar admiralducksauce  is currently offline admiralducksauce
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the reason shapeways is so much more affordable because they are lower-resolution? They could do Solidscape-levels of detail but 10 times the detail takes 10 times the printing time, because you have to lay it down layer by layer. It's not like there's a magic wand they wave and suddenly the model are all 1/2 the price. They can print 10 things for $10 or 1 thing for $100. It quite literally is the old adage "time is money" in this case.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #10166 is a reply to message #10160 ] Wed, 24 February 2010 02:33 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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Yup, you're wrong. Consider yourself corrected. Laughing

The cost of getting any model made is quite high in most companies. Models like the kind we get here for $20 to $50 usually cost over a $1000 elsewhere. Shapeways groups our models together and has worked out some sweet deals with other companies who make the machines that make these models. Their entire business is about taking expensive technology and making it available to a mass audience. If any company could make this happen, it's Shapeways.

(A round of applause, please, for our heroes at Shapeways!)
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #10177 is a reply to message #10160 ] Wed, 24 February 2010 17:25 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stannum  is currently offline stannum
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Another thing to add to maxsmoke comment is that some machines use variable thickness, so detailed zones get thinner layers and non detailed zones get thicker layers, to save time where they can. Or use multiple lasers to work in parallel. So it isn't exactly "double detail, double time"; newer machines, better tricks.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #12028 is a reply to message #10177 ] Fri, 23 April 2010 02:03 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Schaeffer  is currently offline Schaeffer
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Hello,

First of, very nice stuff, I'm amazed at the... well, lack of thickness in some pictures and the detail on the skull ring is amazing, it looks like a fourth of what the mat info states it can do oO
I can't stop looking at that ring Shocked awesome.
I think that ring will go on the wishlist, it will help get me to the 25 dollar order limit so I can get my first models ordered and inspected ^^
If you sell it that is, will check your shop after submitting this reply.
EDIT
Ah nevermind about the skulls ring, I was so captivated by the photo's of it I didn't notice you had it cast. hmm must look into that. again just amazing Smile
The horned dragon i hope was shapeways metal though regarding my question below /EDIT

I was wondering if you could give some measurements from your personal experiences as to how well thickness works and how thin you can go e.g. on those horns with the metal material.

Some looks thinner in some area's than the material info page says.
I'm working on a model which is ending up "too small" in certain area's if I want to keep it pendant size.
The thickness of some protrusions are getting very thin and I was convinced it won't work.
But some of your things look very thin, like the horns making me wonder if my model could work pendant sized.

You'd really be a lifesaver if you could give some measurements.

[Updated on: Fri, 23 April 2010 02:06 UTC]

Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #12029 is a reply to message #5974 ] Fri, 23 April 2010 02:39 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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Registered: August 2008
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I dunno what Skulls Ring you are referring to, but I do have a Ring of Souls that is composed of faces, with a single skull. That was done in SolidScape Wax, which Shapeways has been dragging their feet about adding (come on guys, enough is enough!).

I took the Wax print down to a Jeweler and had it cast in Silver. There is a Steel version which does print through Shapeways, but you can see it's quite a bit less sharp.

As for the minimal wall thickness, the important thing to keep in mind is how much support your structure has. Despite what some misinformed testers at Shapeways will tell you, you can actually print extremely small objects, down to almost the size of a grain of the powder they use to make these things out of. But it will only hold together if you have adequate support to hold that structure up. Think of your thin edges like a pyramid's tip, and build under them so they can hold together.

I've recently had a model set as Unsellable by some new hire at Shapeways, despite the photos I have of the model that show it printed and painted, working just fine. I've had to fight to have some items printed, just because somebody saw a thin edge and assumed it won't work. As long as you're thin edges have support to hold them up, they will survive.

Of course, getting them printed is another problem. I've had to state I will flat-out accept an item in any condition, just to see if it'll work. Most do. I don't mind failures, they just teach me how to do it right the next time.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #12078 is a reply to message #5974 ] Sat, 24 April 2010 13:52 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar akeno  is currently offline akeno
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the biggest problem I can forsee in their eyes is how to ship and pack this material as wax considering its easy melting point and how to go among doing that in general and hotter areas such as california, australia, etc. dry ice is a bad idea and styrofoam only goes so far.
Re: Metal Jewelery Tests [message #12079 is a reply to message #12078 ] Sat, 24 April 2010 14:23 UTC Go to previous messageGo to previous message
avatar MaxSMoke777  is currently offline MaxSMoke777
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I received my Wax Print in the late summer in California, 110 degrees, and the package sat out in the sun for 3 hours before we got to it. The Wax was inside a small, cardboard jewelery box, inside a paper bubble wrap envelop. It wasn't even soft from the heat.

It's a higher temperate material then the candle wax you are used to. The Wax print like this isn't any more volatile then the Transparent Acrylic prints you can get now. I believe they even melt around the same temperature. The Wax though is much finer then the Transparent material, and I believe it burns away cleaner in a kiln.

It's the prefect material for fine jewelery casting, and in fact, was made for producing prefect crowns for teeth. I think my Silver Ring of Souls speaks for itself. This is the ONLY way to do really nice jewelery through CNC printing.

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