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Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #46643] Sun, 08 April 2012 08:18 UTC Go to next message
avatar retalsmas  is currently offline retalsmas
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Hi All,

Has anybody painted the white strong flexible material?

How does it take paint? Do I need to use a primer? Can you recommend a particular type of paint?

I'd ideally like a super glossy, high sheen finish.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Sam
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #46644 is a reply to message #46643 ] Sun, 08 April 2012 08:42 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Pilgrim1908  is currently offline Pilgrim1908
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Yes I have painted WSF. It needs several coats of primer before it accepts paint well, and there is a very rough surface. I would recommend giving it several - ie three or four coats of gloss varnish before you paint it to smooth it out
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #46646 is a reply to message #46643 ] Sun, 08 April 2012 09:51 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stop4stuff  is currently offline stop4stuff
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Have a trawl through the Post Production Techniques forum for WSF.

For a high sheen finish, I'd start with Shapeways Polished WSF, followed by some kind of filler primer*, sanding, more primer/undercoat, sanding, painting followed by polishing or gloss varnish.


*it occurred to me that acrylic woodwork primer work might be good for this as it has some gap filling qualities - as yet untried so your mileage may vary.

Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #46661 is a reply to message #46646 ] Sun, 08 April 2012 22:52 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar retalsmas  is currently offline retalsmas
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Thanks all,

Good advice. I'll post the results when they come through.

Sam
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47361 is a reply to message #46661 ] Mon, 23 April 2012 06:30 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Zoe Brain  is currently offline Zoe Brain
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Painting WSF - there are a few rules.

1. Don;'t use Tamiya paints. The solvents react badly with WSF

2. Do seal before painting. This can be done successfully in several ways: acryllic floor polish works well. Slightly diluted PVA glue works well. Several coats of spray undercoat can work too.

Examples of painted WSF:

This one is decalled and painted. Original model is only 5cm long

http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=33637&d=1328940987

Decalled and Painted models

http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=29965&d=1325145365
http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=29274&d=1324192962
http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/album.php?albumid=979&attachmentid=28462
http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=32705&d=1327740002

After sealing with floor polish:
http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=28453&d=1322967696

After painting, but before dullcoting on lower wing:

http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=29456&d=1324374559

Showing size of models:
http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=32801&d=1327819609
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47425 is a reply to message #47361 ] Tue, 24 April 2012 15:33 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar pinddle  is currently offline pinddle
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Zoe Brain wrote on Mon, 23 April 2012 06:30

Painting WSF - there are a few rules.

1. Don;'t use Tamiya paints. The solvents react badly with WSF




Is that Enamel or Acrylic Tamiya paint that reacts ?

Nice collection of planes,btw.

[Updated on: Tue, 24 April 2012 15:34 UTC]

Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47429 is a reply to message #47425 ] Tue, 24 April 2012 18:26 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Roy_Stevens  is currently offline Roy_Stevens
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Acrylic by definition uses water as a solvent so should be safe on anything, but it doesn't stick well and tends to be less durable, thus the need for primer. I don't have time for that. I airbrush directly on untreated WSF using Floquil enamel with no adverse effects.


Earl Grey, hot.
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47432 is a reply to message #47429 ] Tue, 24 April 2012 19:42 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stop4stuff  is currently offline stop4stuff
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For WSF;
Taymia fine surface primer followed by Humbrol enamels is good*.
Dipping the model in diluted artists acrylic and allowing to dry between dips is good* too.

Smile

*good = no adverse effects or peeling of paint.
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47452 is a reply to message #47432 ] Wed, 25 April 2012 02:43 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Zoe Brain  is currently offline Zoe Brain
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Bunrattypark wrote on Sun, 11 December 2011 18:38

Below pictures of another 1:76 scale bus model in polished WSF. This was sprayed with Tamiya primer, followed by Tamiya gloss. After five days, a stinking residue formed on the surface, eating and destroying the gloss finish, and smelling up the whole house.


Bunrattypark wrote on Thu, 24 November 2011 01:02

One of my customers has purchased a polished WSF model, and sprayed it with Tamiya primer, followed by Tamiya gloss paint.

Five days later, the model began to smell pungently, and a greasy film appeared on the model. The gloss finish became discoloured, and a white residue seeped from it. The smell by all accounts is obnoxious, and spread through the whole house.


Note - these were polished WSF, not straight WSF.

stannum wrote on Sun, 11 December 2011 20:34

It seems that the problem is enamels, or the combination of them with the polishing. WSF with acrylics or CA glue works fine, and someone had posted images of his buildings in WSFP, painted with acrylics too. Have you tried enamels over plain WSF, not polished? If that works, then it has to be the enamels+polishing.

It could be soap or water left overs from the process, that react with the enamel coats. Extra washing and drying should help, but best is probably to cover with something that resists enamels and can dry with water involved, as WSF will keep some moisture inside. Tamiya primer is not acrylic, and their normal "acrylic" paints are not like others, so beware too. Go with artists or model acrylics instead, the type that works with water and have no alcohol.

Sorry, no enamels arround, you will have to buy a small bottle of acrylic varnish, paint or medium (Vallejo's 2 pounds or less) or CA glue, and see if enamel will still react or the acrylic/CA is a good enough barrier. Anyway, clean the models with lots of water first and let them dry.
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47456 is a reply to message #47452 ] Wed, 25 April 2012 06:31 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stop4stuff  is currently offline stop4stuff
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stop4stuff wrote on Fri, 02 September 2011 07:05



...

The horn on the left is plain WSF dipped in diluted Daler & Rowney system 3 Silver acrylic. The horn on the right is polished WSF with 2 coats of Tamiya Fine surface primer followed by 2 coats of Humbrol Silver Acrylic.

http://www.stop4stuff.com/shapeways/images/bari-horns-wsf-pwsf.jpg
Larger image here




And here is a plain WSF Bowie the Bunny, again firstly sprayed with a few coats of Tamyia Fine Surface Primer followed by Humbrol Silver Acrylic spray.

stop4stuff wrote on Mon, 25 July 2011 15:06



...

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6122/5974464032_71cfcf3357_z.jpg
Bowie meets the local wildlife by stop4stuff, on Flickr




I would also recommend that anyone with doubts about just what paint to put on WSF (polished or plain) whould have a google to find out what solvents react with Nylon12 and avoid paints containing those solvents (btw, when I was researching this, I couldn't find any readily available solvents that attack Nylon12 - but you might)

So I guess the upshot is, your mileage may vary IF the model is not properly cleaned before painting.

Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47573 is a reply to message #47456 ] Fri, 27 April 2012 12:28 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Jettuh  is currently offline Jettuh
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Here some more WSF painted models:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7174/6710067193_33595bd07f_z.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7175/6702809129_9a3444111f_z.jpg
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5215/5384699626_88a9dfc97b_z.jpg
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5211/5384699900_449b42a192_z.jpg
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5211/5384093943_6ae90aebbb_z.jpg
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47576 is a reply to message #47573 ] Fri, 27 April 2012 13:43 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar BillBedford  is currently offline BillBedford
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Hi Jettuh

Is there any chance of you bringing these to the next London meet-up so we can talk trains?


Bill Bedford
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #47577 is a reply to message #47576 ] Fri, 27 April 2012 13:45 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar MitchellJetten  is currently offline MitchellJetten
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I work here
Hi Bill,

If you can ask Ralph or Bart to take me with them, I'll join the meetup! Very Happy

Here are the rest of the pictures in FUD and FullColor:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/57124849@N07/


Kind regards,

Mitchell Jetten
Customer Service Coordinator
Shapeways
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #52091 is a reply to message #47577 ] Mon, 30 July 2012 15:16 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar fred.oliver  is currently offline fred.oliver
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I've been soaking my WSF models overnight in a product called Thompson's Water Seal. I figured that, if it works on concrete and wood, it might also work on sintered nylon. I tried painting a small piece with both Model Master enamels and Aero Master acrylics. The paint took well, although I don't know if the soaking helped in any way. The liquid level in the jar has been dropping, so maybe some of it was absorbed by the nylon.
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #52108 is a reply to message #52091 ] Mon, 30 July 2012 20:14 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar stop4stuff  is currently offline stop4stuff
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That's interesting fred.oliver - here's the product page blurb

"Thompson's Water Seal utilises hydrophobic technology to deliver invisible protection against water damage. The deep penetrating formulation travels deep into exterior dry porous surfaces to form a breathable membrane that allows moisture vapour inside the substrate to evaporate whilst protecting against water penetration and damage. Thompson's Water Seal has a unique formulation which, unlike some waterproofers, penetrates the surface therefore waterproofing even after the initial beading is gone. It will not be destroyed by ultraviolet light and is long lasting even under heavy moisture conditions. Assuming application instructions and coverage guidelines are adhered to it provides effective water repellency for years."

Looking further in the small print "Do not apply Thompson's Water Seal to plastic type materials"

Please let us know how the model is after a few weeks.

Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #54861 is a reply to message #52108 ] Thu, 04 October 2012 14:56 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar fred.oliver  is currently offline fred.oliver
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It's been a month or more since I started soaking WSF models overnight in Thompson's water seal. I don't know if it does any good, but it appears to do no harm. I used a glass jar for larger models and a disposable plastic cup for small parts. The Thompson's water seal softened the plastic cup, which may explain the manufacturer's warning. I haven't done any large-scale painting yet so don't know what (if any) difference it will make on the final product.
Re: Has Anybody Painted the White, Strong Flexible Material? [message #57816 is a reply to message #54861 ] Sat, 01 December 2012 08:12 UTC Go to previous message
avatar DoctorOctoroc  is currently offline DoctorOctoroc
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I've painted two polished WSF models so far with no sealing before hand whatsoever. I used Testor's enamel model paints since I had them on hand and after a few coats of each color I sprayed a few coats of lacquer and here are the results:

http://www.doctoroctoroc.com/misc/sonic9_painted02.jpg

http://www.doctoroctoroc.com/misc/sonic11_painted01.jpg

For anyone familiar with the program, these are sonic screwdrivers from Doctor Who. I've carried a few of them around with me to the bar and played around with them, dropped countless times, and thus far no paint chipping or wearing away. If you're curious about the texture on the first one, it's crackle paint (although I didn't lay it on thick enough and it ended up just looking like stucco).

 
   
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