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Greetings [message #32307] Tue, 09 August 2011 00:09 UTC Go to next message
avatar sgheeter  is currently offline sgheeter
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Registered: August 2011
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I'm an IT manager for a living and a medieval armor maker in my spare time.

I am trying to prototype some tools which are multi-part and in use will be under load, what material would you recommend?

thanks,
Steve
Re: Greetings [message #32308 is a reply to message #32307 ] Tue, 09 August 2011 00:36 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Youknowwho4eva  is currently offline Youknowwho4eva
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Welcome!

The Shapeways response is that all items are for decorative purposes only. What kind of load will they be under? WSF (White strong and flexable) is strong, but flexable. So under a load it will flex. Stainless, is Steel so it's very strong and won't flex much.


I learned a long time ago the wisest thing I can do is be on my own side, be an advocate for myself and others like me. -Maya Angelou
michael@shapeways.com Community Advocate
Re: Greetings [message #32312 is a reply to message #32308 ] Tue, 09 August 2011 01:41 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar sgheeter  is currently offline sgheeter
Messages: 21
Registered: August 2011
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Thank you for the reply.

I am prototyping a pair of compound force pliers. I don't need them to "work" but i do need to be able to apply force and not have them flex to test the proportions and/or fitment.

Thanks again,
Steve

P.S. I have been "whoring" this site to everyone i know.. love it.
Re: Greetings [message #32352 is a reply to message #32312 ] Tue, 09 August 2011 16:15 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar sgheeter  is currently offline sgheeter
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Ya know, what would be really nice is some form of "cast iron", like a sintered JBweld...
Re: Greetings [message #32355 is a reply to message #32307 ] Tue, 09 August 2011 17:23 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Youknowwho4eva  is currently offline Youknowwho4eva
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Hmmm yea, I'd only use steel for that. Maybe with a antiqued bronze finish? http://www.shapeways.com/materials/stainless_steel_finishes# finishingpricing4


I learned a long time ago the wisest thing I can do is be on my own side, be an advocate for myself and others like me. -Maya Angelou
michael@shapeways.com Community Advocate
Re: Greetings [message #32369 is a reply to message #32355 ] Tue, 09 August 2011 21:11 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar sgheeter  is currently offline sgheeter
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Thank you for your feedback..

If I could afford the uptake in cost between the grey robust and the steel i would do it in a heartbeat

would Grey Robust or Alumide be more rigid?
Re: Greetings [message #32393 is a reply to message #32307 ] Wed, 10 August 2011 12:48 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar Youknowwho4eva  is currently offline Youknowwho4eva
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Alumide is just WSF with aluminum powder. Grey robust would be more rigid, see down the right side here http://www.shapeways.com/materials/grey_robust . But as you can see in the pictures, the build layers are a little more noticeable.


I learned a long time ago the wisest thing I can do is be on my own side, be an advocate for myself and others like me. -Maya Angelou
michael@shapeways.com Community Advocate
Re: Greetings [message #32404 is a reply to message #32307 ] Wed, 10 August 2011 14:00 UTC Go to previous messageGo to next message
avatar aeron203  is currently offline aeron203
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The Grey Robust material (ABS) is used for hand tool prototypes in industry, and sometimes even for direct tooling with certain forming operations. Keep in mind that it is weaker along the layer plane, so you may have to compensate for that in your design (and hope it is printed in the correct orientation). To get a good fit and realistic clearances, I recommend printing the parts separately and using metal for the hinges, fasteners, etc. You can also reinforce the part with a metal rod insert, blend the layer grain with a solvent, and a variety of other post-process tricks.


Aaron - 40westdesigns.com/blog
Re: Greetings [message #32411 is a reply to message #32404 ] Wed, 10 August 2011 16:24 UTC Go to previous message
avatar sgheeter  is currently offline sgheeter
Messages: 21
Registered: August 2011
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Junior Member
Thank you for all your advice.

come payday I'll be placing my first order.

 
   
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