Category Archives: Fashion

6 Fashion Trends to Design for in 2016

Having just relaunched our jewelry marketplace to better highlight micro-brands and feature curated collections, we’re excited to position ourselves as an excellent destination for holiday shoppers to snag some uniquely designed accessories. While we know our designers have already uploaded some incredible designs, we wanted to flag some trends we saw on the NYFW runway to give our makers a glance at what trend-setting shoppers may be looking for this season.

We’ve also included examples of existing products from Shapeways designers below!Silver reigns supreme:

We saw lots and lots of silver accessories on the runway this season– something to keep in mind when determining which materials you want to offer designs in.

Statement necklaces:

Oversized chokers and large necklaces were prevalent at shows including Balenciaga, Valentino, Loewe, Chanel, and Balmain. This was a fun opportunity to play with larger geometric designs, crazy pendants– great inspiration for designers looking to create some more unusual signature pieces.

Dodeca Horizontal Pendant by Studio Noesis

Earnestly large statements:

From Sachin and Babi to Creatures of the Wind to Altuzarra to Tory Burch, big earrings were everywhere. Large hoop earrings to geometric shapes, we’re excited to see that loads of our designers’ products seem to be similarly inspired.

Star Coral Earrings by Coraline Jewels

Ear cuffs:

Rodarte’s models wore extremely intricate ear cuffs which seemed floral-inspired (one even featured an insect). We’ve seen a number of ear cuffs in our marketplace, so it’s definitely an accessory ripe for design experimentation.

 

Brass Triangles Earcuff by 3Different

Interlocking Circles:

Hellessy sent models down the runway with some beautiful earrings which were made up of metal interlocking circles. This is a perfect trend to pull inspiration from, especially since Shapeways is the only company to offer interlocking metals!

Twisted Square Earrings by ByNatalia

Off-balance:

Lots of designers (Isabel Marant, Christian Dior and Sonia Rykiel) were sending their models down the runway with asymmetrical earrings– allowing for some great variation. Other designers like Mugler, Anthony Vaccarello and Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini, opted for the one-earring look. At Shapeways you’re able to order one earring, making it totally unnecessary to purchase a complete pair for this look.

Septum Rings:

While septum rings had a big moment last year, some made an appearance on the runway during the Monse show this NYFW. Shapeways designers have created a number of faux septum rings– a good option for people looking to try the look without committing to the actual piercing.

Septum Ring by PrimalCrafts

If you’re interested in more in-depth looks at these trends, we recommend checking out this Vogue roundup and this piece from Justine Carreon at Elle for coverage of this year’s trends.

Get Schooled: Featured Student Grant Recipients – Fashion

Throughout time, the fashion industry has evolved with each industrial revolution. The clothing production process embraced new technology with the invention of the cotton gin, the creation of factories and mass production techniques, and, more recently, the Silicon Valley tech boom. Finally, our Nike sneakers could track our mileage thanks to those new, crazy Apple iPods.

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However, the fabrics and design processes themselves have more or less stayed the same for hundreds of years. Though men no longer wear bloomers and women now don jeans and t-shirts, the fashion industry still used the antiquated practices of sketching on paper and producing with traditional fabrics from the days of petticoats– until now. Now, we are at the precipice of the “Fourth Industrial Revolution,” a period characterized by rapid change in industry as a result of new physical, digital, and biological technology.

In this new era, even fashion is keeping up with futuristic methods of manufacturing and materials, leveraging 3D-printing technology to bring innovative designs and production processes to the fashion industry. Here at Shapeways, many of our education grant recipients have created “fashion of the future” and helped to revolutionize the industry as a whole.

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Custom Medieval Inspired Armor: Sovereign Armor from Lumecluster

Earlier this year Melissa Ng of Lumecluster made the Dreamer Regalia Armor for actress and cosplay extraordinaire Felicia Day. With support from Shapeways, she crafted a beautiful custom made piece of fantasy themed wearable artwork. It may not come as a surprise but she’s been very busy since.

Custom 3D Printed Medieval Armor Shapeways

Photographer: Eric Anderson
Model/actor: Marisha Ray

Ng recently unveiled her newest project, the Sovereign Armor. After the Dreamer Regalia armor Ng started to consider how she could take her design to the next level. When she launched it with Felicia and Shapeways, it sparked a lot of discussion around design, craft, gender and the functionality of artwork. She came away with two new concepts to explore; first to show the public that 3D printing is a craft that requires hard work and creativity, and second to show that even decorative armor for women doesn’t need to follow the gender stereotypes of fantasy and video games.

Custom 3D Printed Medieval Armor Shapeways Cosplay Elasto Plastic

Sanding the raw Elasto Plastic

In her blog Ng explains “A lot of people also still think that 3D printing does all the work for you…it doesn’t. Even so, there were debates on whether I actually had to do “real work” since I use 3D printing as part of my process to create intricate and complex pieces. “

Custom 3D Printed Medieval Armor Shapeways Spray Painting Cosplay

Spray painting the primed Elasto Plastic

To show the work that went into this project, she outlines in detail the total hours it took to create her masterpiece: over 518 hours (not including the time it took Shapeways to manufacture). As she did last project, she breaks down the steps it took and clearly demonstrates the care and artistic skill it took to conceive, design and post process the armor into its final form. Ng chose to print everything in Elasto Plastic due to its additional flexibility. After printing she polished and painted the armor, then added fabric and LED lights.

While exposing the craft and labor that went into the armor, Ng started to question the implications of aesthetics and functionality of the work.

Custom 3D Printed Medieval Armor Shapeways Cosplay Moving

Testing the motion of the historically based armor design

“there still seems to be an overwhelming belief that fantasy armor that doesn’t have actual breasts just “isn’t sexy,” “isn’t showing off those feminine curves enough” or “doesn’t help people easily identify that she’s a woman.” I know this is just my opinion but how are the below images not badass??”

 

Custom 3D Printed Medieval Armor Shapeways Cosplay Female

Inspirations for armor design and concept

As someone who started pursuing fantasy art seriously only a few years ago, all these discussions got me wondering how I wanted to grow as an artist. Did I want to throw my interpretation into the mix to help show that a woman can look just as beautiful and sexy in practical looking fantasy armor (that actually covered her body)? Of course “

Custom 3D Printed Medieval Armor Shapeways Cosplay Moving Helmet Mask

Putting on the mask of the finish custom armor

Melissa Ng was armed with a sense that her next project had to not just be beautiful but achieve a sense of meaning through functionality, that the armor was meant for a warrior to defend herself and not just be visually pleasing for a male audiance. Ng started to research traditional armor making techniques and discovered an expert in the  medieval craft: Ian LaSpina, a youtuber who goes by Knyght Errant. She contacted him and he agreed to be her armor consultant.

 

Custom 3D Printed Medieval Armor Shapeways Cosplay

Comparing the Dreamer Regalia and Sovereign armors

Knyght Errant’s Youtube channel and website offers easily digestible content that explores medieval history, armor, armor maintenance, and various types of armor attire and undergarments. His channel and website are an amazing source of inspiration and knowledge that’s perfect for the complete medieval armor beginner, cosplayer, costume maker, and anyone interested in getting an intro to historical armor design and expanding their visual library.

Custom 3D Printed Medieval Armor Shapeways Cosplay LEDs

Testing the Gloves and LED lights for the armor

Ian was kind enough to review my design progress every step of the way through Sketchfab’s 3D viewer to ensure I didn’t make any impractical armor components that might inhibit the wearer’s movement or…y’know…end up harming the wearer instead, haha (I’m looking at you, dangerously spiky pauldrons!! :P )”

The results speak for themselves. Check out the video below, and make sure you dig into Melissa’s Blog about creating the armor here, and actress Marisha Ray’s  photoshoot in the armor for her Geek and Sundry here.

 

Symbols + Science = Jewelry Styles for All

Looking to revamp your jewelry collection?  Symbols are one way to make a statement without going overboard.  They also lend as great conversation pieces for history buffs, trendsetters, and Biochem masters alike.  Our community across the globe has designing symbols down to an art and we’re showing you the creations you don’t want to miss. 

As the masterminds behind Shapeways shop somersault1824, Belgium designers Idoya and Luk make science look sleek. Their minimalist necklaces are perfect for channeling your inner lab geek and make for surprising, sweet gifts.

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Phi pendant from somersault1824

There is more than meets the eye with Phi! This letter is the basis for the Golden Ratio, a principle frequently found math and science which can be dated back to sacred architecture and art.  Another important fact to know: Products from somersault1824  support science education. For every pendant sold, the designers invest $5 of the profit in educational resources for scientists, students and teachers with the aim to make these resources available to everyone. Read more about the cause here.

astrocyte pendant

Neuron pendant from somersault1824

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DNA pendant from somersault1824

If you like this double helix, you may want to experiment with spirals from other Shapeways shops.  Just don’t get it twisted!  Instead, wear the Twisted Pendant by Jaacov Molcho, one of our featured designers in Sparks Across the Globe.

We also love the pendants Antonios Bliss of Athens, Greece created. His designs reflect a modern adaptation of symbols rooted in native New Mexico.

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Native America Zia Sun Symbol Jewelry Pendant from Symbolica.

Any idea what the four parts of this pendant might represent?  Here’s a hint: up to twenty different meanings can be found in total. Read more about the multifaceted design here and discover other fascinating symbols in Symbolica.

Be sure to check out other jewelry designers on Shapeways to find the symbol that suits you and explore all the beautiful options for everyday wear.

America’s Most Beloved Cities, Wrapped Around Your Finger

Posted by in Fashion

Whether you’re from San Francisco, New York, Detroit, or Atlanta – these contemporary rings are made for representing your favorite city, no matter where you are.

Whether or not you’re from Bahston Boston, these wickedly amazing cityscape rings by Shekhtwoman let you wear your city around your finger. And if you’re a transplant from another city, her collection includes major metropolitan areas around the world such as NYC, Amsterdam, Los Angeles and MORE.

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Maybe your fingers can’t hold anymore bling because you’ve totally stocked up on rings that show off who YOU are. If the Rock N’ Roll hall of fame or Orioles get you excited, 3by3D has an excellent way to let you subtly show off your favorite city.

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We also love her whimsical jewelry stands and wall art.  Five Bikes: Wire Wall Art is a great gift for any bike lover and also makes for an easy fix if your walls need a little sprucing up, especially if you live in Amsterdam :) .

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What’s your favorite city?

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More by Shekhtwoman

How to Wear Your Plants

Posted by in Fashion, Jewelry

Running out of room for teeny plants in your tiny house? Fashion has come to your rescue! Artists all over the world are reimagining the boring clay pot planter as wearable art in the latest trend that brings jewelry to the intersection of nature and technology.

Here’s 5 ways to work the wearable planter trend:

If flowers could talk the Little Earring Planter by Yelet wouldn’t be quite so wearable, but thankfully our floral friends are the pretty and silent type. Add tiny real flowers like cherry blossoms, or short dried lavender sprigs. For a bolder pop of color that won’t wilt after a long day of wear add tiny bright silk flowers.

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You’re already wearing Google Glass, so you’re no stranger to being an explorer, making your own trends. The GlassKap Wearable Planter by Baltimore will help keep you planted while your head is flying high on the next big thing.

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According to artist Colleen Jordan diamonds are “so last century” so swap the rock for a tiny bit of soil and plant. Thinking your wearable greenery might clash with yellow? No worries. The Icosahedron Planter Ring is available in white, purple, red and more.

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3d printed in durable nylon Wearable Planter No. 3 by Colleen Jordan is watertight – perfect for those looking for true planter functionality. Add soil, small succulent plant and a cotton or leather cord for an eco-chic look that will have people asking- “Is that really a..”

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All the charm of a bicycle bell- with a little more romance. Add a fresh bouquet to your bike’s handlebars with the Scalloped Bike Planter by Colleen Jordan. It clips right onto your handlebars- no hardware needed.

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How could this look possibly get any greener? All of these pieces are 3D printed on demand in Long Island City, NY- not gobbling up fossil fuels on a long transatlantic journey and air conditioned warehouse.

If you prefer your planters as home decor, check out our whole line of 3d printed home decor, including unique planters.

See Them Grow

How To Add Glam To Your FitBit Flex

Some say the FitBit Flex is the ultimate wearable fitness tracker. Its pricepoint, durability and battery life put it ahead of the pack, all while touting the now infamous FitBit monicker.

But sometimes you want to wear something a bit more upscale than a not-so-flashy rubber-and-plastic(ish) fitness tracker. Bytten makes that possible, completely transforming your FitBit without losing a step. They come in multiple colors, materials and styles; and some are even customizable! Whether you want something edgy… Elegant… Simple… Or completely custom… It’s all here. Check out Bytten’s shop, and tell us how you spice up your FitBit.

Look Awesome this Summer with 3D Printed Accessories

The April rain has finally subsided and the air of summer is moving in! Of course, the warm air brings with it the bliss of rooftop parties, amazing music, and tons of other events – all of which require a different look and outfit.

If you’re seeking for those perfect summer accessories, search no further. We’ve picked the best 3D printed products that will keep you looking cool even in the heat of the summer.

 





These are just a few of our favorite products – want to see more? Check out our list of Summer Must Haves!

 

3D Printed Fashion, Can It Save the Planet? Sabina Saga’s Vision

Americans send 10.5 million tons of clothing to landfills each year.

If you have trouble wrapping your head around just how many articles of clothing that actually is – consider that if each article of clothing is an ounce, then that means there are 326,400,000,000 articles of clothing sitting in a landfill from 2015 alone. Sabina Saga, a Kazakhstan-born designer, has a solution for this and she believes it relies on 3D printing.

Sabina Saga’s 3D Printed Dress
Sabina Saga’s 3D Printed Dress

Sabina Saga moved to NYC in 2007, setting out to become a fashion designer. As she began her undergraduate studies at FIT, she launched her journey into the realm of 3D printed fashion. Little did she know that her time at FIT was setting the groundwork for a new vision of the future: what if 3D printed fashion is the path to a healthier planet, or even, a healthier person?

“In the modern world of fashion, the consumer is aware of current trends and styles,” Sabina says. “They want something fresh every week to keep up with trends. I am looking forward to the near future where it would be possible to throw an old 3D printed garment back into the printer and print a new look in a new color and shape as frequently as desirable, one layer at a time, using only the necessary amount of material required for each part with near zero waste in an energy efficient process.”

SabinaSaga.AW16.LondonFashionWeekSabina Saga’s AW16 Bridal Collection

Imagine that — a future where you can iterate your fashion choices based not only on how you yourself evolve, but the vision doesn’t stop there. Sabina also believes your choices can evolve in relation to your environment.

“3D printed fashion stands a chance of becoming essential in order to protect us from polluted external sources,” she says.

Fundamentally, fashion is about expressing yourself and communicating your individuality to the external world; but the external world has its dangers. Whether it’s polluted air, UV radiation, viruses and allergies, there are unavoidable forces in the modern world that effect and influence us. Perhaps, using the right technology, we can supplement our fashion choices by creating garments that not only express who we are, but protect who we are.

In order to actualize this future, Sabina has taken her work to UAL-Chelsea College of Arts in London, where she’s started her masters degree studying TED’s TEN, a program which assists designers in researching textiles and smart materials that have a reduced impact on the environment.

The future through the eyes of Sabina Saga is a future worth looking forward to; and it is the minds of artists like hers that will push the limitations of 3D technology in a direction that will be beneficial to us all. We’re truly excited to see what she comes up with next.

CaX20PDWQAQDyvESabina Saga at London Fashion Week 2016

Since her senior thesis show at FIT, Sabina has exhibited her fashion items all over the world, including Inside 3D Printing New York, The Creative Arts Event in London, and 3D Printing conferences in Dusseldorf. Her next show will be at TechnologyHUB between June 7-9 in Milan, Italy.

 

Prioritize your Personal Self-Expression with 3D Printing

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‘Don’t be into trends. Don’t make fashion own you, but you decide what you are, what you want to express by the way you dress and the way you live.’ – Gianni Versace

Inherently, fashion is a form of self expression that has the ability to show the world who you are without having to say a word. In today’s world, we style ourselves (and our homes) with the clothing, jewelry and goods that are made readily available to us by different brands, be it large or small. Thus far, that’s worked just fine — but what about a world where you are your own brand? Where you decide what gets made, based on your own preference. Is it possible? Is it even realistic?

Overwhelmingly, yes. I envision a future where your personal and aesthetic expression are prioritized over that which is made in mass — and without a doubt believe that 3D printing is the avenue that will help us achieve this future. Why is your self expression important? Below are a few reasons.

It’s sustainable. In traditional retail, a brand will come up with designs that they believe will have consumer appeal, and then manufacture a certain number of those designs based on projections. All too often, those brands will over-manufacture a piece, only to have hundreds (or thousands) wind up sitting a warehouse — which is an effective waste of material, space and labor.

The beauty of creating your own products with 3D printing, is that the only market validation you’ll ever need is your own. Since products are produced as you order them, you have ease of mind that you’re getting exactly what you want, from an environmentally friendly source that you can trust.

It’s infinite freedom. With customization made more accessible, you no longer have to settle for the almost perfect item. Not everyone may want to design their own everything – sometimes, it’s about making custom modifications to the things that are almost what you’re looking for. Perhaps it’s a piece of wall art that would be so great for your room if only it were just a little bit smaller, or in a different color than is available.

The made-to-order nature of 3D printing means there’s infinite possibility to customize products in a way that is true to exactly what you want. Today, we already have powerful tools such as CustomMaker and ShapeJS that make it easy for anyone to make modifications to products they love.

It’s tools like these that begin to pave the way to the wave of the future, where we’ll see more software and hardware applications expanding to a point where you can customize literally any item you could possibly want.

It’s uniquely you. The most important piece of this is you. Today, you can take your passion and wear it close to your heart, literally. Whether you have a love for science, or a love for ravens – it’s all made possible with 3D printing.

We are lucky enough to be living in a world where we are finally liberated from the mass-produced constraints of our predecessors, and it has only just begun. The future will only give way for more opportunities for you to be you.

Three Ways Handmade Jewelry Designers can use 3D Printing

How does digital manufacturing fit into the craft of handmade jewelry? We get asked this question a lot, so we put together three key ways it can speed up your design and production process, save you money and free you up to have more design time (and space).

1. Stock up on popular models. The best part about being a designer is the design process; it’s the ideation, the sketching, and the execution of that new piece of jewelry, getting to bring it into the physical world. That experience is especially fruitful when your design is recognized and wanted by others. However, it can become time-consuming to recreate that same piece over and over again to meet your customers’ needs.

With 3D printing, this process can be made much easier. Now, it’s possible for designers to order the base design of their jewelry pieces, only needing to apply their fine-touch stone setting or polishing techniques in post production. This saves time, and ultimately allows for more space for a designer to explore their creativity and start imagining their next pieces.

2. It requires less studio space. We’ve all been there. You graduate college, or move to a new town, and all of a sudden lose access to the tools and studio space required to keep creating. Or as a new designer you can’t afford to rent space. With 3D printing all you need to get started designing is a computer, software, and (occasionally) an internet connection. Looking for the right software to get started with? We’ve got you covered.

3. Proof of concept for complex prototypes. We all have that one idea that requires ALL the things. Maybe it requires a number of jump rings, chains and highly ornamental pendants. But it’s just a concept, and you’re not totally sure if it would work in real life. Making it in finished materials would not only be expensive, but incredibly time consuming.

Using our innovative prototyping materials, such as strong and flexible plastic, you can create interlocking, chain-like pieces with intricate details and have it 3D printed at a fraction of the cost. This also lets you vett out your designs, understanding all the small tweaks and changes you’d like to make before taking the plunge and investing in the final materials for the piece.

These are just a few ways to start thinking about using 3D printing within your handmade craft. But the ways of utilizing the tools of digital manufacturing are endless, and we can’t wait to see what you come up with next.

The Art of Engineering a 3D Printed Petal Dress: Nervous System defies convention again.

The designers at Nervous System have outdone themselves yet again, this time 3d printing a bright-red dress inspired by flower petals, feathers and scales. The design was created in preparation for the upcoming #Techstyle exhibition at The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Kinematics Petal Dress

Nervous System’s newest Kinematics Petal Dress features over 1600 unique facets and 2600 hinges, creating a directional landscape of overlapping, petal-like forms. The petal-like textile appears to behave like fabric, delicately molding itself to the contours of a body.

While this is not the first 3D printed dress created by Nervous System, it is the first of their dresses to utilize a more sophisticated set of textiles. Historically, we have seen the tessellated triangle structures that makes up the 3D printed Kinematic garment. Yet, the new dress features a variety of overlapping plumes protruding from each triangle framework, creating the petal-like textile.

With new textiles, emerged new challenges. Creating each petal shape is not only sculpturally ambitious, but it poses a whole new challenge that demanded the reconsideration of how to actually fit the dress into the build platform of the 3D printer.

The limitations of 3D printing require that each 3D model fit into a specific bounding box, which optimizes for efficiency when printing. With previous dresses, Nervous System had developed software which applies smart-folding techniques to each garment, compressing their size for efficient 3D fabrication, and ultimately unfolds into their intended shape post-printing.

Image courtesy of Nervous System

However, the structural differences of the new petal textile created compression and folding challenges for the team.

“Producing dresses with overlapping scales gave us new challenges and opportunities. Our previous garments had been printed folded to make them efficient to print. But, the overlapping scales don’t fold efficiently. They can really only bend in one direction which prevents us from employing our previous compression strategy.” – Jessica, Nervous System

scaleBend4Image courtesy of Nervous System

“On the other hand, the overlapping nature of the shells makes it possible to have hidden snap-together connections.  This allows for the creation of reconfigurable garments. In the case of our dress, we created a 3-in-1: your dress can be a top, a skirt or a dress.” – Jessica, Nervous System

multipart-768x458Image courtesy of Nervous Systems

Breaking the dress apart into three pieces would only be part of the solution. In order to print the dress as efficiently as possible, the garment needed to be further consolidated into a bounding box that would minimize space utilized in the printer. Since it could not be folded, they developed an entirely new method of collapsing the model: why not roll it up like a carpet?

Image courtesy of Nervous System

After months of prototyping, developing and prep work, the piece was finally ready to send to our selective laser sintering 3D printers in Long Island City.

As you can see, the Kinematic Petal dress is not just another springtime, floral inspired dress. It is a feat of engineering, a work of art, and another breakthrough for the Nervous System collection.

Naturally, the Nervous System team didn’t stop with just the dress. They’ve also created a jewelry line of petal inspired products, which is now available in their shop.

Petal Jewelry

If you’re interested in learning more about the process of creating the dress, check out Nervous System’s Blog and find out more. And if you’re in the Boston area, be sure to stop by the Museum of Fine Arts between March 6  through July 10, 2016 to see the piece in real life.

Click here to follow Nervous System and stay up to date with their newest creations on Shapeways!

3D Printing for Fashion: Interview with Alexis Walsh

Fashion Week may be wrapping up here in New York City, but that doesn’t mean that we’re finished exploring all the great work our fashion-driven community members are producing here at Shapeways. Today, we’ll be exploring the work of Alexis Walsh, a fashion designer turned 3D modeler who designed the LYSIS collection and the Spire Dress, recently featured in the Nire - Hopscotch music video.

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Spire Dress, Designed by Alexis Walsh and Ross Leonardy

Alexis Walsh is a New York tri-state native that studied at Parsons the New School for Design until 2014. During her time at Parson’s, Walsh took a combination of fashion and product design courses. As her primary focus was in fashion, she became interested in exploring ideas about wearable sculptures, and utilizing non-traditional materials and techniques to create fashion items.

“Throughout my academic career, I’ve been interested in the idea of wearable sculpture. I’ve explored using materials like metal and plastic to create garments, even welding a dress out of steel rods and making a corset out of aluminum paneling. All of this was very rooted in the notion of handcraft. After doing some research and discovering that 3D printing allowed for the creation of incredibly complex forms, I decided to pursue it for fashion design. With additive manufacturing, you are enabled to create structures that would be impossible to produce through any other medium, and this seemed like the perfect vehicle to experiment with fashion design.” – Alexis Walsh, 2016

It was around this time that Walsh began to conceptualize The Spire Dress, which was one of the first 3D printed projects that Alexis worked on. The dress was printed at Shapeways in our White Strong and Flexible material, constructed out of 400+ individual tiles that were assembled by hand using metal ring connectors. While this is quite an ambitious project for anyone just getting started in 3D modeling, we asked Alexis about her experience teaching herself the tools of the trade.

“The idea of learning CAD modeling from scratch was definitely intimidating. There are so many programs, and there’s a pretty steep learning curve when first attempting to 3D model. It took countless hours of YouTube video tutorials, trial and error, and reading online troubleshooting forums before feeling comfortable with Rhino and Grasshopper. But once you get a handle on it, you can begin to learn everything fairly quick. You need to simultaneously be concerned with creating a model and with how the model will function as a physical printed object. 3D printing generally involves plastic, which takes some creativity to work into a wearable piece.” – Alexis Walsh, 2016

Realizing the tactile limitations of using only 3D printed plastic, Walsh set out to create her next fashion line, the LYSIS collection. The LYSIS collection features handmade garments that are combined with 3D printed components to give structure to each of the pieces. These works were able to come to life after she received the Shapeways Education Grant in Fall 2014.

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Piece from the LYSIS Collection, 2016

Alexis is certainly not afraid of pushing the limits when it comes to combining materials and techniques to create fashion items. The LYSIS collection was created using a combination of software and hand-touch techniques to apply the fabric and leather. Alexis even went to far as to use the 3Doodler 3D printing pen to apply details to her smaller accessories, such as belts and chokers.

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LYSIS Collection, Alexis Walsh

Alexis is one of the few designers that we’ve seen successfully created an entire collection of fashion items using 3D Printing, and we wanted to hear about her projections for the future of this budding industry are. How will this technology evolve, and what are her hopes for the future?

“3D printing for fashion is undeniably in its early stages. There has already been so much innovation happening within the past couple of years, and this will only further continue into the future. I’m very excited to see how the capabilities of printing textiles will progress, specifically softer and elasticized textiles that behave like fabric. There are enormous possibilities for 3D printing within the performance and athletic-wear industries. It’s been great to see iconic brands like CHANEL embracing 3D printing in their runway shows, and I’m looking forward to seeing more 3D printing in high fashion.” – Alexis Walsh, 2016

And finally, as we mentioned in last week’s blog post, we posed the question to Alexis about her thoughts on the viability for 3D printing as form for fashion manufacturing.

“There’s potential for 3D printing to be a viable method of fashion manufacturing, but I don’t think that the current technology is there yet. There’s a huge market for 3D printed jewelry and accessories right now, and in that regard additive manufacturing is a great method of production. With the way the industry is evolving, fashion is sure to follow suit, as soon as more advanced printing capabilities can be developed.” Alexis Walsh, 2016

On that note, within our conversations with Alexis she teased a few of her upcoming projects that specifically focus on jewelry and accessories. We’re so excited to see what she comes up with next!

Stay tuned for our continuing series of blog posts as we continue to talk with designers about the future of Fashion, Tech + 3D Printing.