Category Archives: 3D Printed

That Dorne Dagger on the Season Six Premiere of Game of Thrones? We 3D Printed That. [SPOILER AHEAD]

Image Credit: Macall B. Polay/HBO

Game of Thrones, Season 6 Episode 1 | Image Credit: Macall B. Polay / HBO

When Ellaria Sand whipped a dagger out of her bracelet on Sunday’s Game of Thrones season 6 premiere, we gasped, but not for the same reason you did. For months now we’ve been keeping a secret: the designers from Game of Thrones partnered with Shapeways to create items for the show and this–this!–was the dagger we had 3D printed for them.

We were thrilled to get plunged right into the heart of the seven kingdoms in collaborating with them on this hidden blade. You know, THIS one, the Dorne Dagger:

Image Credit: Tommy Dunne, Weapons Master / HBO

Ellaria’s Dagger | Image Credit: Tommy Dunne, Weapons Master / HBO

Like all the designs that make up the rich, detailed world of Game of Thrones, the dagger is intricate and gorgeously appointed, thanks to the work of Sean Forsyth (3D designer), Tommy Dunne (Weapons Master) and David O’ Brien (Bronze Art Foundry). They chose to have it 3D printed by Shapeways in high resolution Frosted Ultra Detail which is the perfect choice for such fine details–as you can see from this behind-the-scenes peek at what the dagger looked like straight off the printer.

Ellaria's Dagger, 3D Printed in Frosted Ultra Detail | Image Credit: Tommy Dunne, Weapons Master / HBO

Ellaria’s Dagger, 3D Printed in Frosted Ultra Detail | Image Credit: Tommy Dunne, Weapons Master / HBO

It was then shipped to Weapons Master Tommy Dunne, who did the meticulous work of finishing the dagger and bringing it fully to life.

Ellaria's dagger | Image Credit: Helen Sloan / HBO / www.makinggameofthrones.com

Ellaria’s dagger | Image Credit: Helen Sloan / HBO / www.makinggameofthrones.com

“I have always wanted to incorporate 3D Printing into armoury, and this was our first chance in actually doing so,” Tommy shared with us. “The outcome of the Dorne Dagger far exceeded my wildest dreams from our original drawing concept, so it was a great first experience in using this technology in our field. It was a delicate scene to shoot, but the producers of the show loved the dagger so we’re really happy with the results.”

We are too, and we can’t wait to see what the producers of this show bring us next!

Are you a fan of Game of Thrones? Then click on the pictures below to shop the Game of Thrones inspired designs in our Marketplace.   Complete with dragons of course!

Got

What would you want to make for the show? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

How a Simple Mod Made an Entire Community Happy

Every few years automakers change up the entire design of an automobile. Frame, sheetmetal bodywork, engine, transmission and more to help give a vehicle a refresh and push buyers to want the newest model.

With the redesign of their Cooper line, Mini changed a lot about the third generation model. It was elongated, given a new engine and transmission, along with smaller details like this alien-like spaceship keyfob design.

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User jwhdevries wasn’t fond of this odd component and after a little research and seeing other Mini drivers fix the issue with Sugru moldable rubber or electrical tape, decided there was a better way to fix the issue at hand. The fob was unnecessarily large, and odd-shaped, and they found that the extra plastic was entirely unnecessary. With his 3D design knowledge, he designed this product in Strong & Flexible Polished plastic.

MiniFob

After posting it on North America Motoring, a Mini- focused forum community with a massive positive response, it was reviewed on Motoring Fun, further pushing it up the ranks.

Through a bit of frustration, a lot of motivation and some serious creation, this product has been one of our top sellers in April; starting as a shared issue within a tight-knight community..

Have you created an amazing lifehack that helps fix a simple issue? We want to hear about it! Tell us about it in the comments below, and share it with us on social media by using #Shap3dByMe!

Follow Seth on Shapeways here

3D Shaver – Personalize Your Shaver With 3D Printing

3D printing technology and online customization tools are opening up new possibilities in manufacturing a personalized product. And what could be more personal than shaving?

That was Philips’ thinking when it opened up its classic men’s shaver for personalization. The 3D Shaver, developed in partnership with Shapeways and Twikit and custom designed by you, is currently being offered by Philips in a limited edition trial.

3D Shaver Tool

Shavers can be configured with different handle designs and colors at 3dshaver.com. Once ordered, the custom parts are 3D printed and dyed at Shapeways’ factory in Eindhoven and shipped to Philips in the Netherlands for final manufacturing and assembly. The shaver is then packed in a custom box and shipped to you within 2-3 weeks of placing an order.

3D Shaver 4 Colors (800vers)

The 3D Shaver is exclusively available in The Netherlands. There are only 125 3D Shavers available and only two shavers can be ordered per day. A large number already have been sold, so you’ll have to move fast to get one.

We’re excited to partner with Philips on this and they have long shared Shapeways vision for the future of 3D printing; we were founded in 2007 in Eindhoven as part of Philips’ lifestyle incubator and look forward to working with them on more personalized products in the future.

Keep Your Lightning Cables Unfrayed With This Lifehack | Shapeways Reviews

Your iPhone’s low on battery, and you’re digging through your pack looking for a lightning cable to juice up your phone, but the only one you can find looks like this:  

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Yep, a completely frayed, non-working cable.

BUT! There’s a way to keep this from happening. This nifty little piece of plastic by TheKre8Group lets you quickly and easily wrap your cables to keep them tidy and safe from undesirable bending and fraying.

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Wrapping a cable is super simple.

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Insert the USB end into the larger slot.

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Wrap the cord around, starting in the beveled channel and wrapping upwards, making sure not to double-layer any part.

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Once you’ve wrapped the cord, insert the lightning end into the smaller hole to hold it secure.

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Now, you have a simple, affordable, compact solution to help prevent expensive cables from fraying and breaking.

Check out our video review here:

Do you have a neat way of keeping your cords organized? We’d love to hear it! Leave it in the comments below, and let us know what you want to see next. Follow TheKre8Group on Shapeways here , and be sure to check out their shop here.

Follow Seth on Shapeways here

Children Pushing The Limits of 3D Printed Porcelain: The 10 Winners of the Chil-Dish Project

Design the perfect dish for your favorite dish. That was the challenge posed by Kristos Mavrostomos and Anna van der Leij of the Chil-Dish project to children visiting Helsinki Design Week in Finland last September. (You may remember us writing about it here.)

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As you can imagine, children loved this and by the end of the week there were over 300 drawings to choose from! Anna and Kristos had no easy task picking the ten winners as the ideas were all fun and imaginative but the winning designs not only needed to be creative, they had to translate into a 3D model that was suitable for us to print for them in porcelain.

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We can’t share the magic of our printing in porcelain as it’s still a secret, but we can share the winning designs—complete with the child’s favorite dish. Because, after all, that was the challenge and what’s a porcelain dish without food?

That’s where Restaurant OLO comes in. Located in Helsinki, they received 26th place in the White Guide (the Nordic equivalent of the Michelin Guide) last year, making them the best restaurant in Finland for 2015. So good food was guaranteed!

The chefs from Restaurant OLO took the Chil-Dish winners to different shops and markets to buy the ingredients for their dish and helped them prepare it.  As you can see from the photos and video, this was a one-of-a-kind experience that took children through the process of bringing their ideas to life.

Childish-finished

Our 3D Printed Porcelain is food safe, so this was an amazing opportunity to blend creativity, children and high quality food! Again a big shout out to Kristos Mavrostomos and Anna van der Leij for starting this project, and to all the chefs from Restaurant OLO for working together with these amazing children! Looking forward to the next edition.

A SuperHERO Case for Your GoPro HERO | Shapeways Reviews

You’re an action sports HERO, or at least you want to be. So, you went out and bought a GoPro to record those CRAZY things you planned to do. Skydiving, scuba diving into the depths of the ocean, and evading NYC taxicabs on your bicycle. But you really just use it to document your family vacations, finding you want better sound quality and don’t ALWAYS need that waterproof case.

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This simple GoPro case by whitenoise_customs frees up your GoPro. By being completely non-restricting, this case allows amazing access to the microphone, and all the buttons, while still allowing you to attach the stock mounting base. Tether this onto the selfie-stick or gorillapod of your choice, and be ready to capture some footage to remember. (As long as you’re not going swimming!)

Getting this case on is super simple.

Take the GoPro out of its waterproof housing.

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Slip the GoPro into the frame case.

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Screw the mounting base on, and there you go. A super simple case with a sunshade. Or without. The case comes in a few different variations, all with the same awesome fit, so pick the one that best fits your needs.

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Check out whitenoise_customs’ shop here to get your case, and check out our full video review of this great accessory.

We want to see your favorite 3D printed GoPro accessories. Tag us on social media with #Shap3dByMe, and send us your Shapeways GoPro lists! Let us know what you want to see next in the comments below, and never stop creating.

Follow whitenoise_customs here

Follow Seth here

Making a Case for The Apple Watch | Shapeways Reviews

You open a door in a hurry and simultaneously smash your wrist on the doorframe. Sure it hurts, but you also hear a slight crunch. You look down, and sure enough, your brand new Apple Watch’s screen is smashed to bits.

Which is where today’s review comes into play. We’re taking a look at two Apple Watch cases with slightly different form factors.

Now, you may be thinking, “why do I need a case for my watch? I wouldn’t put one on my Rolex, or Omega” But that’s where the Apple Watch separates itself from traditional watches whose screens “take a beating”. The iWatch will get damaged far before a nice traditional watch will. So cover up!

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The first case we’re checking out is Dungstar’s 14k rose gold plated cover. This attractive yet functional cover looks great, feels great and gives the device a cool, unique look.

Getting the cover on is simple and anchors it to the watch.

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Pull the bands off your watch Snap the cover right on top, aligning the buttons.

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Slide the bands back to lock into place.

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Taking a look at this case you can see it offers pretty solid coverage around the entire case, while leaving the screen somewhat exposed. This makes sure you’re never blocked while using the watch, allowing full-motion access to all of the screen, without eliminating the sleek and minimalistic form factor.

The second protector we’re looking at is a 18k gold plated cover by Mstyle183. Assembly is the exact same as with the previous case, using the bands to lock the cover in place.

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At first glance, the case looks almost the exact same too, but once you look closer, and start using the watch, you notice that it covers the screen quite a bit more. It helps to protect a bit more of the front of the watch, which makes it a little bulkier.

If you’re looking for a sleek, minimalistic case for your Apple Watch, Dungstar’s design is a great option. But if you want something that provides a bit more protection, definitely check out Mstyle183’s option. Check out our full video review here:

Do you have one of these cases? Let us know what you think about it. Leave your comments below, and let us know what you want to get out of these reviews.

Follow Dungstar on Shapeways here

Follow Mstyle183 on Shapeways here

Follow Seth on Shapeways here

Gain Back Time with This Hack for Your Apple Watch | Shapeways Reviews

“Bzzz Bzzz Bzzz Bzzz.” Your alarm is going off
Every morning, I knock my Apple Watch off its charging cable on my nightstand, trying to smash at the alarm going off. Unable to see nearly anything at 6AM in a subterranean Manhattan apartment, I spend the next 5 minutes searching for the Watch under my bed. Luckily, a Shapeways designer, StudioNeat, created a solution for that.

Because it’s magnetic, the charging puck doesn’t tether to the Watch like an iPhone’s lightning connection. StudioNeat’s solution is a small plastic clip that has spaces to hold both the charging puck and the Apple Watch to ensure a solid, safe connection that won’t scratch up your gadget.

Here’s how it works:

Place the puck face-up in the bottom of the holder.

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And then place the Apple Watch right on top of it.

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Now you’ve got a charging solution that won’t fall apart when you think your morning is  falling apart.

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Check out our full video review here:

What do you think of this awesome simple design? Let us know in the comments below and be sure to tag what you want us to review @Shapeways and #SWGadgets on social media.

Follow StudioNeat on Shapeways here and check out the Apple Watch Charging Puck here.

And follow me here.

3D Design & Printing for the Fashion Industry: Interview with Chester Dols

Today we’ll be interviewing  Chester Dols, the 3D modeling mastermind behind Ohne Titel’s 3D printed dress that debuted yesterday at New York Fashion Week.

Chester Dols, a graduate of the Shapeways & Eyebeam Computational Fashion Master Class, is a talented 3D modeler and designer that combines in Rhino, Grasshopper, Maya & python scripts to generate interwoven garments.

unspecifiedChester Dols with his piece at Re-Making Patterns, 2015

Earlier this year, when Shapeways was approached by Ohne Titel + Microsoft with a pitch to create 3D printed garments for their AU16 runway show, we thought to ourselves; who would be a great 3D designer fit for this project? After looking at the initial sketches, we saw stylistic and aesthetic similarities to Chester’s work, and realized he would be perfect fit for the project.

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Final 3D Printed Knit Dress, Photos Courtesy of Ohne Titel 

Within this blog post, we’ll learn about Chet’s journey from architecture to fashion, and what inspired him to take traditional architectural parametric design applications and re-conceptualize those approaches to design for the human body.

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Close up render of Ohne Titel Dress, Photos Courtesy of Ohne Titel

Tell us a little bit about yourself: Who are you? What’s your background? Where/when did you get started 3D modeling?

I am an interdisciplinary designer currently based in Brooklyn, NY.  My background and education is in architecture where I used 3D modeling to sketch and communicate my ideas.

What inspired you to begin 3D modeling?

I’m not sure which came first, the practice or the inspiration to practice, but I know that 3d modeling has become a natural part of how I think, sketch, and formulate ideas.

At what point did you learn about computational fashion? How did you find out about it, and what did you find appealing about it?

While studying architecture in college, I had a strong interest in parametric, computational design.  Studio mainly focused on how computation applied to the scale of the building and the building envelop, but I was given the chance through an independent study to think about computation as it applied to the body.  I ended up creating a simple algorithm over a semester which allowed me to create “tailored” clothing based on a series of measured inputs.  The project, I realized later, was an exploration into the basic idea of graded patternmaking, a process used within the fashion industry to streamline sizing and clothing fit.

Screen Shot 2016-02-16 at 8.59.58 PMParametric textile patterns made by Chet for our Computational Fashion Class

Now that you’ve worked in the “3D Printed Fashion” space for a bit, what are your opinions about field? E.g – What do you think are some of the biggest obstacles for fashion designers moving into the digital space and vice versa?

The process and methodology of fashion is so different to fields which rely heavily on 3d modeling to create and materialize their ideas.  In fashion, you work with fabric, paper, pencil, scissors, and draping tape to design and produce.  Furthermore, fabric isn’t like a nurb surface or polymesh, it has many physical and structural characteristics that affect its performance (ie. knits, wovens, jacquards, cotton, silk, polyester, polyblends, etc.).  I’m not sure if fashion designers or the the additive manufacturing industry has more obstacles.  It may be hard for a fashion designer to jump into a modeling space and create something that is printable, but I think it will be more difficult for 3d printed materials to reach the sophistication of the many different types of textiles already out there.  That being said, there is so many exciting things happening right now and sooner or later I believe these industries and technologies will all converge and create really beautiful things.  For me, designers and engineers experimenting with this kind of technology are the thinkers leading us into tomorrow.

How do you see this field growing in the future? Is there anything you’re looking forward to?

3d printing is still in its infancy and so is the concept of 3d printed textiles.  Like I mentioned before, I’m waiting for industries, technologies, and science to converge.  When we can successfully and seamlessly print with multiple materials, that is when things will get interesting.  Right now, there are printers which print with two materials; take for instance Shapeways’ frosted detail plastic, which prints a wax support material and a polymer resin at the same time.  But what if the second or third material isn’t a support material?  If we can get 3d printers working like a loom, weaving together many materials at once to create a “polyblend” print with complex graded materiality, that’s when a new fashion will emerge.

Do you have any advice for designers looking to dive into this space?

Take inspiration from everything, and look to culture and things that already exist to make new and innovative designs.  My designs look to architectural joints, knits, wovens, and chainmail and I take inspiration from both the natural and synthetic.  Think beyond the form of the body, and really think like a textile designer; consider the touch, the texture, and the performance of your textile and garment.

What are some brands, designers or artists that inspire you?

 Faustine Steinmetz (textile and fashion designer), Jaime Hayon (product designer),  New Territories (architecture), David Altmejd (artist), Walter Van Beirendonck (fashion designer), C-Fabriek (product design), Neri Oxman (architect and thinker), Raf Simons (fashion designer), Vetements (fashion), SuperStudio (architecture), Moebius (illustrator)   …. I could go on and on….

If there were zero limitations for this technology, what would you make?

Ok, so there is this scene in the 5th Element, directed by Luc Besson, where they 3d print Leeloo (Milla Jovovich) from a strand of her DNA taken from the remnants of her hand.   If our technology reaches that point, where we aren’t only printing an object with one material, but objects and subjects with unlimited elements, compounds, and materials, I would totally print a puppy or puppy-cat hybrid or something.  Not sure if I stand by that ethically, but you’re asking a hypothetical.  Crazy thing is, researchers are already doing something similar by printing with stem cells to print functional organs.

 

Behind the Product with Corinne Whitaker

Today we are showcasing, Corinne Whitaker, a pioneer in the digital arts. Whitaker got her start in the digital arts in the early 80’s processing irrational equations through various programs to see what forms would appear. After more than 3 decades, her work has grown to include massive 3D printed sculptures, catalogs of digital designs, and paintings. Whitaker has exhibited her work at galleries and museums around the world.

corinnewhitaker

Could you tell us a little about yourself? 

I am based in Foster City, CA., in the heart of Silicon Valley, at the
epicenter of the “Can Do” ethos, surrounded by innovation and optimism. I
started working/playing with computers in 1981, when I became fascinated
with the patterns and colors they offered, realizing that they could see
millions more colors than the human eye. I was also intrigued by the idea
that I was entering unknown territory, where few had ventured before me.
There were lots of questions, few answers, and no rules (my kind of
place). That’s why my recent solo show at the Peninsula Museum of Art in
Burlingame, CA was titled “NoRules”! This meant that I didn’t have the
ghosts of Ansel Adams on one shoulder and of Picasso on the other. It was
both exhilarating and scary.

gr_blackpearl

Where does your experience in 3D modeling originate?

Initially there were almost no art programs, let alone 3D, so I began by
entering irrational equations into science programs to see what would
happen. I love accidents, and I still work that way. At the start, desktop
computers had neither parallel processing nor multi-tasking, so creating
in 3D was more than challenging. (ie, 48 hours of down time, ending in a
frozen screen and no image!). Eventually I worked with a Canadian company
(Alias Sketch) whose software offered organic possibilities combined with
excellent customer support; unfortunately they were bought out and
discontinued.

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What is your preference in modeling software and why?

Computers at that time were essentially edge-based and geometric, whereas
I have always been drawn to the organic. This continues to influence my
choice of programs today.

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What are your designs inspired by? Could you please share the story behind your sculptures?

My designs are influenced by my conviction that the human species is due to expire, either by self-destruction, exhaustion of natural resources, or cosmic intervention (are we the dinosaurs, after all?) so I create as though I were out in the cosmos somewhere, free of gravity, and speculating on what the next creatures might look like.I am also convinced that a new visual language is necessary to reflect the change in viewpoint that NASA gave to us with its explorations in space. Basically they freed us from Renaissance perspective and introduced a cosmically-based view of living matter. The next group of creatures will almost certainly be based on something other than carbon: what happens if they view us with dismay, if they do not want to acknowledge us as their forebears, if they cannot even figure out what humans were used for? Being unseen in history is a terrifying thought (although one familiar to women artists, but that’s another story).

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What was your first interaction with 3D printing & Shapeways?

Shapeways has played a large role in my success. It is a leader and
ground-breaker in the industry, enabling me to experiment with life-sized
3D printed figures where other were afraid to try. Its professionalism is
admirable and its customer service a joy. 3D printing allows me to bring
to life the swirl of designs that populate my visual realm. As an industry
it will definitely revolutionize many fields of endeavor.

gr_jive2    gr_finian

Could you describe your process for creating your sculptures?

My thought process is one of letting go and traveling through ideas. It
involves the challenge of putting your ego aside and letting yourself go
crazy to some degree. As artists we have the luxury of knowing that
although we share the wild territory of the insane, we have a round-trip
ticket back to what is commonly called sanity. I like to say that we are
willing to touch the thorn barehanded in order to know the rose.

gr_blackswans              gr_dervishgold

At the moment, the biggest difficulty in creating 3D printed sculpture
remains the software. It presents a steep uphill learning curve.
Familiarity with standard 2D software does not translate easily into 3D,
and each 3D program tends to have its own vocabulary. Eventually we will
do away with the software entirely.

But if you love challenge, if you love exploring the new and unfamiliar,
if you love experimenting and want to taste tomorrow, this is the place to
be!

gr_3Dblobs

For more with Whitaker:

You can find all of Whitaker’s work on her website, www.giraffe.com

To learn more about her history, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corinne_Whitaker

Current Exhibitions:

On view at Vargas Gallery, Mission College 3000 Mission College Blvd, Santa Clara, CA 95054 December 1st – December 19th

“Virtually Solid: Digital Fabrication as Sculpture” at Wilson Center of the Arts, Florida State College 11901 Beach Blvd, Jacksonville, FL January 2016

On view at Paul Mahder Gallery 222 Healdsburg Avenue Healdsburg, CA 95448 (http://www.paulmahdergallery.com/artists/whitaker/corinne_whitaker.htm)

Publications:

Four catalogs of CAD models and poetry, all titled “If We Are Erased”

www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=corinne+whitaker         www.giraffe.com/gr_catalogs.html

“It’s like putting a microscope inside my brain to illuminate the origins of my new species.”

Better With Shapeways video series kicks off with Will Haude of 3DBrooklyn

Here at Shapeways, we are inspired by the creativity and enthusiasm of our community and are passionate about enabling you to make anything you can imagine. This week, we’re launching a series of videos to celebrate our community and inspire others to bring their ideas to life with Shapeways.

Today, our spotlight is on Will Haude, creator of  3DBrooklyn. He says “3D printing empowers me to create whatever object I can think of, because that’s exactly what it does. Shapeways lets me print in a range of high quality materials that I cannot print with my printers. It’s great to have a manufacturer and marketplace on one site.” Watch his video below to see how he brought to life a 3D printed bike blinker with Shapeways and littleBits.

Want to win $100? Each day this week, we’ll be launching a new video featuring a designer and their 3D printed product. Share the video of the day on Facebook and tag it with #BetterwithShapeways, and you will be entered to win $100 in Shapeways credit! See below for details and make sure to come back, see all five videos, and enter the sweepstakes each day.


#BetterwithShapeways Sweepstakes Rules

1.     Eligibility. This contest is operated by Shapeways.  It is open to Shapeways users in the United States over 13 years of age at the time of entry who live in a jurisdiction that does not prohibit this contest.  Employees, officers, and directors of Shapeways and their immediate family are not eligible to enter.  Individuals may enter more than one entry into the competition but may not do so by way of automated means.  By entering this contest, you agree to be bound by these Rules.

2.     Prize. The winning entrant will receive $100 in Shapeways credit to make a purchase on Shapeways.com.

3.     Contest period. This contest is open on Monday, September 28 from 10:00am EDT to 11:59pm EDT.

4.     How to Enter.  Share the video or a link to the video on Facebook and tag it with #BetterwithShapeways.  You may also enter by sending a postcard with your name, phone number, and email address to:

Shapeways
Attn: Contest Department
419 Park Ave. South
Suite 900
New York, NY 10016
Postcards must be received by the end of the contest period in order to enter.

5.     Winner Selection.  Shapeways will select the winner from the pool of applicants on Tuesday, September 29.  There will be only one winner.  Shapeways will be prepared to award the prize to a runner-up in the event the winner cannot be contacted in a reasonable amount of time.  Shapeways will determine the winner by randomly drawing an applicant from the entire pool of applicants.

6.     Winner notification. The winner will be notified via email.  Upon contact, Shapeways may need to obtain confirmation of the winner’s eligibility.  If Shapeways cannot contact the winner through the contact information in their Shapeways account in a reasonable amount of time, a runner-up will receive the prize.  If a runner-up cannot be contacted, Shapeways will select a third place finisher to receive the prize.

7.     Taxes.  The winner will be solely responsible for paying all federal, state, and local taxes that may be due on winnings and, as a condition of receiving the prize, Shapeways may require the winner complete tax documentation.

8.     Liability and Jurisdiction.   All federal, state, and local laws and regulations apply; void where prohibited.  All disputes arising out of or connected with this Contest will be resolved exclusively by a court located in Manhattan, New York, USA.  Decisions by Shapeways regarding the interpretation of these rules are final.  By participating in this contest, you agree to release Shapeways and its agents from any and all liability, claims, or actions of any kind of injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, possession, use, or misuse of any prize.  Shapeways reserves the right to amend these official rules and to permanently disqualify from this contest any person it believes has intentionally violated these official rules. Shapeways reserves the right to suspend or cancel this Contest in the event of hacking, security breach, or other tampering.  Any questions regarding this contest should be directed to community@shapeways.com.

C0DE DENS1TY

Ashley Zelinskie’s world where things made of code are made of things are made with code….

C0DE DENS1TY is a collaborative, multi-media show presented by Lightbox, a gallery Space in New York City from July 23- 26. The show highlights work by Shapeways community member Ashley Zelinskie. Zelinskie creates sculpture which are made of numbers drawn from the code of the design file itself. Her work explores the process by which the objects are transformed from numerical data into physical objects through digital fabrication. The code that defines and creates the object becomes part of its physical manifestation…

…its a pretty mind-blowing concept.

The show itself is an immersive experience bringing viewers into the brackish waters of technology and art. Sparse, geometric objects ranging from monumental to palm sized are displayed throughout the space while nearly every inch of wall is used for a projected video that loops geometric imagery as it builds to a frantic pace and glitches out into nothingness. On the second story loft area a small 3d printer farm reproduces out miniatures of the work.

Faces made of 3D printed plastic are part of the show’s vocabulary as well. An interactive piece has several white masks displayed with light projected onto them. Visitors are encouraged to touch the masks, doing so causes the projection to animate boxes emitting out as if from underneath them.

On of the most interesting pieces is also the most personal. A 3D printed portrait of Zelinskie created with 3D scanning, the surface is constructed from a portion of her own DNA.

Zelinskie’s futurist universe invites the viewer to both question how the objects are made and what the implicates are of a world where data and matter can become interchangeable. Far from a dry series of formulas simplified beyond human comprehension, the vision of the Singularity posited by C0de Dens1ty is like stepping into a thunderstorm of information.

 

Photos: by Ashley Zelinskie.

Two New Visualizations in Shapeways 3D tools: Bounding Box and Parts

Designing for 3D printing is more than just making a 3D model.  It’s understanding how big you want your figurine to stand on your desk, how thin your ring can be in plastic versus gold, and keeping track of all the details on intricate models while making sure all the parts are connected.  We launched Shapeways 3D tools in January to help bridge the gap between creating and designing a 3D model and actually  having it printed by giving you more confidence to know when your model is ready for the printers.

Today we are launching two new visualizations in 3D tools to help you further understand what your model will look like when it lands in your hands: a bounding box visualization and a part count visualization.

 Understanding Model Size: Material Specific Bounding Box Visualization

Understanding how big or small your model is physically and what materials you can print it in based on it’s size can be challenging when you are staring at your model on a screen and can easily zoom in and out.  This is especially true if you are designing for multiple materials – what’s the right size model that lets you print in all your favorites? Understanding how to change your model to make it the right size – is one part of the model too long? Do I just need to scale it slightly smaller? – can be tricky without being able to see the maximum and minimum size you can print in for a specific material.

By clicking on the bounding box tool in 3D tools, you can understand both how large or small your model is in relation to the bounding box for a specific material, and what part of your model is too big or small. Our visualization combines two elements: coloring parts of the model that are too big or too small red so you know which parts have issues, and visualizing the maximum and minimum bounding box oriented around your model as a transparent box.

When your model is within the size guidelines to be printed, you will see it inside the maximum bounding box.  So if you were thinking of making it a bit bigger or smaller, you can get a sense for how much you could change the size of your model.

size, bounding box, visualization, shapeways

If your model is too large, the part of the bounding box where the model is sticking outside the maximum bounding box will turn red to help you identify along which dimensions your model is too large.  If you have a multiple part model, only the parts of the model that exceed the bounding box size restrictions will turn red. Parts of your multiple part model that are OK in size will remain grey.

bounding box, size, too big, shapeways, visualization

If your model is too small, you will see it colored red inside a minimum bounding box.  By moving your model around, you can see which dimension(s) of your model are too small.

bounding box, size, too small, visualization, Shapeways

Identify Accidental Loose Shells: Part Count Visualization

Building detailed, complex models can result in incredible creations that are a marvel to hold and see.  Sometimes though, with so many details and parts, loose shells can accidentally be created.  Loose shells are pieces of your model that are separate and unconnected from the base part of the model. These can be intentional, but are often unintentional.

Our new part count visualization helps protect you from ordering a model you expect to come in one piece, but actually receive in many pieces because it uniquely colors each and every part. For example, in this model made of connected stars, all the stars were intended to connect to each other except two of them were slightly misaligned.  With the part count visualization, you can clearly see the accidental loose shells – the two unconnected stars – and fix your model appropriately.

part, multiple parts, part count, 3D tools, Shapeways

Go to 3D tools today from My Models or Model Edit and check out your models in the bounding box and part count tool to see how big or small your models are or if you have any accidental loose shells!

 

My heart beats for you: 3D printed anatomical hearts on Shapeways

Whatever your feelings on Valentine’s Day, one thing we all love on Shapeways 3D printed hearts that our community members who are scientists, artists and designers are creating inspired by that vital organ beating in all of our chests.

Shapeways Crew member Nathan Schmidt created this design inspired by his daughter Lucy, who was diagnosed with a rare heart condition. He shared her story on our blog last year.

Another Crew member, Chris Leggett, created an anatomically accurate heart based on data available from the National Institute of Health’s 3D Print Exchange. You can read more about how he created this model in his blog post about science and 3D printing.

Too much heart? We also love designs inspired by heart beats like these rings:

Like this list? You can share Shapeways products anywhere with our new embed feature!

Unique gifts for every cyclist in your life

We all know someone mad about bikes, ever eager to get out and ride even when its cold, wet or uphill. To help you celebrate their passion with them, here’s our spin on gifts for every type of bike snob, from the fixie fan to Fred.

garm

No garmin, no rules? They can decide with this Garmin-mount compatible iPhone case because sometimes no Garmin, no idea where you are. This mount also keeps the camera handy for all the cycle photography that happens on long road rides. They’ll love that they can get all the #lightbro shots.

Do they enjoy getting covered in mud every weekend? It’s likely cross ruins everything around them, so here’s a replaceable chain guide/ front derailleur for their next cyclocross race. You can also find replacement cable guides and more bike parts.

bike

On the other end of the spectrum, for the Sunday riders who dote on their vintage steel, you could get them this decorative tiny Italian for their collection.

vintage

For the single speed commuter, help them maintain the Zen with this multipurpose tool, good to fix just about every mechanical issue.

tool

CitiBiker’s know sharing is caring, but letting them keep both hands on the bars with this cup holder attachment is truly the gift that keeps on giving.

citi

Lastly, some say that life’s too short to ride boring* bikes…so choose from fancy accessories like this stylish crane cable guide, handlebar bike planter, novelty blow-fish valve caps or commission a custom head badge.

collage

Whatever you gift your cyclist friend, remind them to ride safe, and stay rubber side down.