Category Archives: Shop Owner

Congratulations, Shop Owners! Shapeways Now Powers Over 20,000 Shops!

It is with great excitement that we announce that there are now more than 20,000 Shops open in the Shapeways marketplace! WOOHOO! Cheers to you! This is truly an inspiring milestone for all of us here at Shapeways.

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Shapeways set off a mission to help people make the products they actually wanted over six years ago. After seeing the design potential and talent in our community, we knew there had to be more people who would appreciate and value your work. Since then, our marketplace has matured into an entrepreneurial ecosystem of Shop Owners. Everyday we work hard to give you the tools and the exposure that you need and deserve to build your 3D Printing business.

Our Shop Owner community has doubled over the last 15 months! When I started working at Shapeways in May of 2013, we were just crossing the 10,000 Shops mark; to think we’re now over 20,000 is incredible. It’s thrilling to see more and more artists, designers and entrepreneurs making money off sharing their 3D printed creations with the world.

Congratulations! Pat your self on the back! You’re a valued member of the largest community of creatives innovating in 3D printing. We are proud and grateful to call you a Shapie.

Not a Shop Owner yet? Open a Shop today! For the existing Shapies, how long ago did you open your shop?

 

 


 

Shop Owner Bootcamp: The Importance of Taking Photos of 3D Printed Products

Shop Owner Bootcamp is a 10 week series aimed to help Shop Owners prepare for holiday. Week 9 is focused on product photography and the importance thereof.

Have you been thinking about taking photos of your products but been making excuses for why you don’t need to? Keeping your shop up is no easy task, but a little effort upfront leads to significantly greater sales. If sales aren’t enough, we are constantly looking for great models to feature on Shapeways and promote through our press and media opportunities. Most publications won’t print renders, and there is nothing more disappointing than not being able to feature a Shop Owner because we don’t have any photos of their great products. Plus, photos help build your reputation too, as Vijay discussed last week.dragonfly-shapeways-paul-liaw

I was a very late adopter of iPhoneography, despite having been a smartphone user for nearly a decade. Admittedly, I’m not sure I would have felt 100% genuine telling you to shoot your holiday collection on your phone before last week. Paul Liaw, the designer behind NeoNouveau is a legend; an award winning digital artist, a Adobe showcased 3D Printing designer, and is this week’s Shop Owner mentor. When not 3D modeling, he brings the lucky community team at Shapeways cheesecake!

Sav-Paul-Nat-Shapeways

This week’s challenge is to take photos. Products that have sold, sell 10x more when they are photographed. It is impossible to stress enough how much photos can make a difference in your sales. Use these quick tips to make your products sing:

  • Use a single tone background – while white is classic, any solid color can do. Don’t have a plain table or desk? Lay down some 2D Printer Paper or a bed sheet. It’s amazing how far you can get with resources around the house.paul-bracelet-alligator
  • Stabilize your camera or smartphone; books, tables and trees work in a pinch – the easiest way to screw up a great shot is to blur it. I always shoot products here at HQ on our white Ikea desks, with my iPhone in landscape mode, resting on the table.
  • Shoot multiple angles – without the ability hold your product in their hands, customers want to see every angle. Pretend you’re taking it out of the Shapeways box for the first time and capture the angles you examined first. Even if you feel silly taking the photo, it could be the one that makes the sale. No need to hold back with the shutter, thanks to our smartphones, a tap is all it takes to discard extras. Paul-Liaw-Fish-Side-Shapeways
  • Always shoot in landscape – our product photos are 625 x 465 and its much easier to crop them when you’re shooting horizontal. In fact, if you’re shooting in landscape, you’re likely already framing your products in this ratio.
  • Show Scale – The average consumer can’t visualize millimeters the way we all can. People, pets, currency, common household items, even fingers cad add crucial context for your consumers.fish-coin-paul-liaw-shapeways
  • Tag materials in your photos – this is the easiest way to set customer expectations. When the material in the image matches the swatch the price reflects, the anxiety surrounding a first time buy is eased. It’s easy to forget this important step; and yet we see it convert to sales, and with material filters, it really helps surface your great products. Click the camera icon in the upper right hand of your product photos to check and set the material tagged in each.
  • Compare Materials and Finishes - Not everyone is as familiar with our materials as we are, showing the difference makes a difference. For example, here are Raw Brass (top) and Raw Bronze (bottom) version’s of NeoN0uveau‘s wheat bracelet. Paul-Liaw-Wheat-Bracelet-Shapeways
  • Have fun! Customers will be drawn to your personalities and you can tell a lot about yourself and your brand through your photos. We encourage you to upload as many photos as you want, invite friends over and get creative with your product shoot.

What’s the greatest barrier between you and great photographs? How can we help?


 

You Have Until September 8th to Submit Your Designs for the Next Round of SuperFanArt

If you have 3D prints you would like to submit to be part of the Hasbro + Shapeways + You = SuperFanArt extravaganza, you have until September 8th 2014 to be part of the next round.

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SuperFanArt is now accepting anyone to submit their 3D printed designs based on Hasbro owned IP including:

  • Dragonvale
  • Dungeons & Dragons
  • G.I. Joe
  • Monopoly
  • My Little Pony
  • Scrabble (to be sold in US and Canada only)
  • Transformers

Full details and instructions for both new designers, and existing designs can be found on the Shapeways SuperFanArt page.

Most importantly, when you submit your design, please be sure to include the tag SuperFanArt so that we can find and include your submission.  For inspiration, take a look at some of the submissions that we have received so far.


 

At Work on the Road: 3D Printing, Designing and Living Around the World

One Infinity small pendant in polished grey steel at Mondello Beach, Palermo, Italy

One Infinity small pendant in polished grey steel at Mondello Beach, Palermo, Italy

by M.G., a member of Shapeways Crew and an American artist living abroad who sells her work she creates on Shapeways through her shop Sloris

Reduce the entirety of your belongings to two suitcases; all the clothes, accessories, documents, electronic devices and toiletries that you’ll need for the foreseeable future.  Don’t forget a sample of your 3D printed products.  Take a minute, or two.  

That’s how I live.  My partner and I run our business, www.sloris.com, from the road.  Our traveling home office consists of two laptops, two external hard drives, a tablet, a point and shoot digital camera and a HD digital camcorder.  And, of course, Shapeways.

My first ex-pat experience was living on the west coast of Mexico at the age of 24.  My most recent adventure was in the South of Thailand.  I lived four years in each location, which seems to be as long as I can happily settle in any one place (Brooklyn being the exception ).

Even considering this history, my current lifestyle is a radical change.  I’m moving every month or two, until either I find a place I’m so enthralled with I can’t imagine leaving or I’m too exhausted to continue.  My next move remains to be determined; it’s exciting, it’s scary. There are many considerations, but the main factors are attraction to the culture, the availability of inexpensive housing and transportation possibilities:

A combination of research, persistence and creative thinking is required to make this a reality.  I consider being really good at this my own little superpower. How does all this affect running a business and my creativity?  The running a business part is made possible by two factors:

  • Online networking:  its importance, accessibility and value makes living and working from the road not only possible, but effective.  Facebook is a good base, but my recent foray into Twitter and Instagram have helped me to engage a wider audience.

  • Shapeways: acts as my support staff by handling payments, returns, refunds, customer service and shipping.  Print on demand technology eliminates the problem of over and under stocking and the need for a storage facility.

Holeyware Espresso Cup at Teatro Massimo, Palermo, Italy

Holeyware Espresso Cup at Teatro Massimo, Palermo, Italy

Conveying exactly how this lifestyle affects my creativity is trickier.  When I’m stationary for a time, I build my environment very carefully.  I like my surroundings to be placid and inviting, completely free of clutter.  Routines are essential.  Having all the odds and ends of life scheduled gives my mind the chance to roam freely, unencumbered with worry and little decisions.  Being on the road makes everything I just listed impossible, but is equally inspirational.

On the move, I’m at the mercy of the environment and the apartment I find to rent.  I’ve already experienced a variety of decors; retro hippy, uber modern minimalist, French country and a split personality atmosphere where Mom enjoyed doilies and tea sets and daughter thought IKEA was the answer to everything.  The extent to which I’ve enjoyed living amongst and using other people’s belongings has really surprised me.  I’ve read things I never have before; gossip mags to improve my Spanish (I know more about princesses than I ever cared to) and décor trade rags.

Office view in Fuengirola, Spain

Office view in Fuengirola, Spain

I love learning the differences, substantial or seemingly insignificant, between cultures.  Thailand has an amazing cuisine and no matter how big or small the city, you can find many restaurants offering a wide variety of delicious complete meals priced at 30 baht (approximately 1 USD).  In Spain, I experienced an absolute dedication to siestas.  In downtown Granada at 2:00 pm every single business, except restaurants, closes and locks their doors.  The buses bulge with passengers as everyone makes their way to meet up with friends or family.  In my current apartment in Palermo Italy, there’s a toaster like I’ve never seen before.  I know it sounds ridiculous to mention such an insignificant product, but consider how many people across the globe use a toaster in the morning.

These shifts in behaviors and items affect my creativity because they spark interest in a way of life or an object that usually goes entirely unnoticed.  It revives a sense of newness and proves that there is still space for original concepts and products.

Then there are the things that can sap my energy levels and temporarily crush my spirits; fighting grouchiness after close to 48 hours of straight travel, sacrificing creature comforts to stay within our tight budget, trying to communicate in a language I don’t speak and living and working 24-7-365 with my partner of 23 years.

At the time these situations occur, I certainly don’t feel creative.  It’s as if I’m chained to a stairmaster, forever climbing and getting absolutely nowhere.  It’s exhausting and frustrating.  After the fact, I often need some down time to recover.  During this period I look and feel completely unproductive.  However, in many instances, I emerge from this dormant time with a plentitude of fresh ideas and enthusiasm.

I often work long hours, but then I walk out my door into a completely new and captivating world.  For me, it’s perfect, but I’d love to hear your thoughts and experiences.  Do you also work from a traveling home office?  Would you want to?

You can follow my adventures on my blog at and check out my products on my Shapeways shop

Finding inspiration in the streets of Palermo, Italy

Finding inspiration in the streets of Palermo, Italy


 

How to Submit Your 3D Prints to Sell with SuperFanArt

Submission are now open for you to submit your 3D prints to sell with SuperFanArt, the Shapeways and Hasbro collaboration to enable fans to make and sell designs based on Hasbro licensed brands.

Submit your 3D prints to Superfanart on SHapeways

As mentioned previously, SuperFanArt is now accepting anyone to submit their 3D printed designs based on Hasbro owned IP including:

  • Dragonvale
  • Dungeons & Dragons
  • G.I. Joe
  • Monopoly
  • My Little Pony
  • Scrabble (to be sold in US and Canada only)
  • Transformers

Full details and instructions for both new designers, and existing designs can be found on the Shapeways SuperFanArt page.

Most importantly, when you submit your design, please be sure to include the tag SuperFanArt so that we can find and include your submission.  For inspiration, take a look at some of the submissions that we have received so far.

We can’t wait to see what you create!


 

Refining the presentation of products in your Shapeways shop

by William Seligman

From Eleanor: William Seligman is a jewelry designer who creates pagan and Wiccan themed Jewelry on Shapeways for his Kickin’ Wiccan shop. He posted a version of this entry on his blog and we enjoyed his thoughts about how to effectively edit, curate and present products in your Shapeways shop so much we wanted to share them with the broader Shapeways community.

The three Kickin' Wiccan styles of triquetra ring in raw bronze.

The three Kickin’ Wiccan styles of triquetra ring in raw bronze.

On my 53rd birthday, I lost an intricately-designed custom-made ring that was precious to me. The ring was made 15 years ago; the original jeweler no longer had the molds. So I started looking into ways to recreate the ring from photographs. I discovered Shapeways in the
process. After months of experimentation with 3D software and many test prints, I finally had my ring again.

I emerged with a self-taught skill set in 3D design and printing. I decided to put those skills to use in a market I knew well from being a consumer: Wiccan and pagan jewelry. It’s my first experience with setting up a storefront on-line.

Recently, I consulted with the talented artist Vann Godfrey about Kickin’ Wiccan, my jewelry shop on Shapeways. I’ve spent the past few days putting his advice into practice. Vann’s advice was similar to that of Shapeways’ advice to its shop owners. Here’s what I’ve figured out, both from Vann and from my own investigations:

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No more plastic or renders for shop images

Plastic models, no matter well I photograph them, will never look as good as pictures of metal jewelry. Plastic models of metal jewelry detract from the look of the shop. A single plastic photo will drag down all the other pictures, no matter good those other photos are.

This has two corollaries:

  • I’ve had to pull items from my shop because the only pictures I have of them are of my plastic test prints.
  • I can also create rendered scenes from the same 3D graphics program I use to design the rings. I’ve reached the point where my scenes are slightly better than the photographs of plastic, but they still look artificial. They’re not good enough to put on my storefront. Even if I did, Shapeways frowns on rendered scenes; if I used them, Shapeways would not consider my store for promotional purposes.  Eleanor’s note: We now feature material renders, which you can read about here, but still encourage actual product photography as the best way to show off your designs. 

 

So some of my designs will have to wait until I get metal prints and take pictures of them. I won’t add a new design to the shop until I can print it, or arrange for someone else to print and photograph it for me. Eleanor’s note: we also encourage designers to try out Beta products for this purpose. 

This can happen: I designed a heptagram ring for a friend. To my surprise, the response was so positive that I was encouraged to make it available for purchase even though all I had was a rendered image. I’ve asked the buyers to send me photos. This is nice reinforcement. It tells me that maybe, just maybe, I know what I’m doing.

WGS-kilt-full

No more plastic jewelry

I’ve stopped selling plastic versions of my designs. For one thing, it helps the shoppers if they have fewer options to choose from. For another, I have to value my time and skill in creating the jewelry.

Most of my designs are rings. When the shopper buys a ring, they have to specify the ring size. I customize the design for that particular size. This takes time. It’s barely worth doing for the stainless-steel versions of the rings; for me it’s not worth doing for cheap plastic versions.

In general, there many good reasons to work in plastic, but the jewelry I am making is not suited to it.

What choices have you made to edit the products you sell on Shapeways? How do you decide which designs to offer and in what materials?


 

Tweet Your Best Tweet Forward

We recently added Twitter to your Shop Owner profiles to allow you to share updates with your followers. You can have a shop/brand handle on your Shop page and your personal handle on your profile page. As the social media specialist at Shapeways, I believe that Twitter is an exciting platform for Shapeways Shop Owners and users to showcase work, market products, and generate conversation around your Shapeways Shop.

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If you’re already on Twitter and follow @Shapeways, I’m often the eyes that get to see all of your tweets. My favorite part about Twitter is that it’s only 140 characters and it’s a great way to provide frequent updates to your followers. If you’re a Shop Owner or designer looking to tweet about your work, following these best practices for composing a tweet will significantly increase the likelihood of engagement (retweets, favorites, mentions, replies).

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Here’s an example of a quality tweet by Brandon George, the owner of the Shapeways Shop 3by3D. Let’s breakdown what makes this tweet a great tweet in my opinion.

1) It includes a quality photo relevant to his tweet. Everyone is competing for eyeballs on your Twitterfeed so having a attractive visual image in your tweet gets twice the response rate than a tweet without a photo.

2) The tweet uses hashtags like #Flower #mensfashion #Style which relate to the product being promoted, and using popular hashtags increases the chance of exposure of your for people searching for that hashtag.

3) The tweet includes a shortened URL linking back to his Shapeways Shop where interested followers seeing the tweet can be directed to find his shop.

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(Shop Owner Jeremy Mallin tweets about his Mobius Cinquefoil Knot Pendant)

I plan to continue to share more social media tips and tricks to help the Shapeways community win on social. In the meantime I can be reached at eric@shapeways.com if anyone needs any advice on social media strategy.

Remember to tweet your best tweets forward and you can engage with us on all of our other social media channels below!

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Shapeways
Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/shapeways
Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Shapeways
Find us on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/shapeways
Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/Shapeways
Follow us on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/shapeways


 

Sneak Peek into new ways to design products on Shapeways: First To Try & Beta Products

Here at Shapeways, we’re changing how products are made and by whom. We have makers and designers from all over the world in our community, some of whom are making their first product and others who have been professional product designers for their whole lives. They’re creating everything from jewelry to rocket ships, GoPro accessories to chess sets. No matter what they’re making, though, we know how involved the creative process can be. Taking a great idea and making it real takes a lot of hard work and iteration before amazing products come to life.

With 3D printing, designers are not alone in the creative process. They don’t have to spend thousands of dollars to get the form and function just right, and they don’t have to wait to go to market until they’ve undergone extensive testing. With the support of their friends and fans, they can share their products with the world and get the feedback they need — wherever they are in the product development process.  We’re committed to helping you create great products, by embracing iteration and encouraging your customers to actively participate in earlier stages of product development. Step one is setting the right expectations, and step two is opening up the conversation around products.

Today, we are excited to give our community and particularly Shop Owners a sneak peek into two new ways to get support and feedback on early stage products that we’ll release later this summer: First to Try and Beta.

Shop Owners, you can see all of the new tools on your model edit page today and preview what your products will look like when this is released to shoppers later in the summer.

Beta 

BetaProduct

Design is becoming far more collaborative across companies big and small, and we’ve already seen thousands of examples on Shapeways in which designers and customers work together to tweak products and make them more personal. We want to make it easier for Shapeways Shop Owners to tap into this trend and develop deeper, ongoing connections with their customers.

The first way we’re fueling this kind of collaboration is called Beta. Products in Beta are in active development and are being improved upon through product iteration.  As a Shop Owner, you will be able to invite your friends, fans, and communities to support you in the product development process and get feedback to improve the design. You can ask for feedback on how it fits, whether they like the design, or anything else you need to get your product over the finish line. More and more, people want to be a part of the creative process — we’re excited to help open up the doors with you.

How will this work?

The purchase area on your product page will prominently announce that this product is in Beta, and has space for you to briefly explain to customers your goals and what you’re looking for in the Beta testing. You can opt to make your product a Beta Product or to move it out of Beta at any time.

Beta Materials

By positioning your product in Beta, you will have a private comment stream to collaborate with your customers and solicit their feedback. We see a lot of this happening in comment streams today on Shapeways, but we also want a private place to encourage honest feedback and collaboration on products. Elaborate on your goals, ask specific questions, and keep customers up to date on the progress of your product and new versions you’re working on. We’ll be encouraging customers who buy a product in Beta to come back here after they receive their product to share photos and let you know what they think.

Learn more about how to use Beta Products

 

First To Try
First To Try Product

3D printing a model in every material finish you’d like to offer for sale can be quite expensive. We’re working hard to reduce the barriers to entry and we don’t ever want to make you 3D print a model in every finish yourself unless you prefer to. However, because 3D printing is still new, some customers don’t understand the risks subtleties involved with 3D printing and can be disappointed if their product doesn’t turn out the way they were expecting — or especially disappointed if it can’t be printed at all.

As a part of our efforts to increase transparency about the manufacturing process with designers, including the Print Success Rate

we are also going to provide more information to shoppers by showing the “First To Try” label on any product that hasn’t been printed before in that material. This helps shoppers understand our level of confidence that we can successfully create the product that they are looking to buy.

How does this work?

When your product has First To Try materials enabled, your customers will see a different set of choices on your product page. We’re also investing in beautiful material renders that match the color and finish of all of our materials, so you can show a shopper exactly what the product will look like, while also helping them understand that they are one of the first to 3D print it in that material and are seeing a computer-generated render, not a photo.

Once you or your customers have successfully printed your product in each material you’re offering for sale, the First To Try label won’t apply any longer. There are a few ways to progress through First To Try:

  • You can enlist your friends, fans and community to buy your product and share a photo, which will be important for your long term product success
  • You can print the product in your preferred materials and ensure you meet the Print Success Rate before you launch your product
  • You can disable the materials that haven’t been successfully printed before

Learn more about how to use First To Try

 

Beta vs First To Try

When you are really hoping to get feedback on your product — from fit to form to function and everything in between — we recommend using Beta. It’s a great way to solicit feedback and build a community around your products and ideas.

If you’ve already tested your product and are trying to understand whether you product can be successfully made in a given material, First To Try is your best bet. It sets the right expectations for your customers and helps you enlist support.

 

The Future of Product Development at Shapeways

With a process as new and rapidly-changing as 3D printing, expectation setting is critical. But we know there is no one-size-fits-all solution. We’ll continue to build more tools to help you solicit support from the community and help them understand how the process works. We’re really excited about these new additions to our marketplace, and would love for you to join the discussion here in comments and the forum to let us know what you think!

Learn more about Product Development at Shapeways, or jump into the tutorials on how to use Beta Products & First To Try in your shop today.


 

Shapeways shopowner Susan Taing of bhold design at the first ever White House Maker Faire

Posted by in Shop Owner

On June 18 the White House hosted its first ever Maker Faire, as part of the first National Day of Making. Susan Taing, Shapeways shopowner and founder of bhold, was there as an Honored Maker and I caught up with her about her experience. She also shared more about her time at the White House on the bhold blog

What did it mean to you to be part of this event?

It’s immensely inspiring to see our government be so forward-thinking. It meant a great deal to me to see President Obama following through on his initial words spoken back in February 2013 during his State of the Union Address, by personally hosting the White House Maker Faire, declaring June 18th the National Day of Making and announcing programs to support all of us. I’ve believed in the potential of the maker movement and the 3D printing industry for a while now, but having the President himself deliver this message is something you usually only dream of. 

I was ecstatic to be invited as Honored Maker, out of 100 invited makers representing 25 states, and loved feeling the usual hyper-curious, positive and supportive Maker Faire vibe at the White House itself!

Continue reading


 

National Day of Making: 3D printing powers small businesses

Posted by in Shop Owner

In part three of our series celebrating a Nation of Makers today, we are highlighting how Shapeways is inspiring and empowering makers with tools to build their small, creative businesses. Shapeways entrepreneurs are different. They are creatives unsatisfied by other manufacturing and fabrication options on the market, elevated by their ability to 3D model, and their fueled by passion for their craft. 

Read on for more case studies on how Shapeways and 3D printing is liberating design from the constraints of traditional manufacturing, serving underserved markets, empowering 3D modelers to build businesses, and lowering the barrier to entry to start a creative business.  

Continue reading


 

Shapeways Small Business Spotlight: Jeremy Burnich

Posted by in Shop Owner

In honor of Shapeways’ commitment to makers and empowering small business owners, this week we are featuring Shapeways shop owners on the blog discussing how they started, and are growing, their business with Shapeways. Jeremy Burnich is a based in Pittsburgh, PA and runs the Joy Complex shop, which focuses on jewelry and accessories. He has recently launched a new shop, 3D Race Tracks, focusing on his love of motorsport. Jeremy will be leading a class at Tech Shop Pittsburgh on how to open and run a successful Shapeways Shop on Sunday, June 22nd. If you are in the area you can sign up here

What prompted you to open your Shop on Shapeways?

I wanted to make a Valentine’s Day present for my wife.  The present I made – a pendant, modeled from a recording of my voice saying “I Love You, printed in silver – became a taking point for people at her work.  So I thought, why not make it and similar designs available for everyone? 
How has having a Shop on Shapeways affected your life?

I finally enjoy waking up in the morning and “going to work.”  I hope to earn enough to quit my day job.  I definitely know, for the first time, that I love doing what I’m doing now.  This realization wouldn’t have happened were it not for Shapeways and I’m grateful for it. 

Continue reading


 

Shapeways Small Business Spotlight: Dennis C. Roffe

Posted by in Shop Owner

In honor of Shapeways’ commitment to makers and empowering small business owners, this week we are featuring Shapeways shop owners on the blog discussing how they started, and are growing, their business with Shapeways. In his DreamTree Imagination Studio shop Dennis C. Roffe, based in South Carolina, designs products under the motto “Life is hard… Design it better.”

What prompted you to open your Shop on Shapeways?

I opened my shop in order to bring the designs hidden in my brain and scribbled in my sketchbook to reality.  Shapeways offered me a way to prototype my designs at a decent price and offer my designs for sale.
Since 1984 I’ve been working as a product designer in the automotive, HVAC and medical industries.  I started technical, 3d modeling with ProEngineer in 1987 and recently started free form modeling using Blender and Sculptris.
The focus of my shop is to create fun and useful products with unique designs.  I plan to put more of a branding focus on my Guitar Gear products.
How has having a Shop on Shapeways affected your life?

It has helped me to bring my designs to reality. I never pursued any of my designs in the past because I knew what prototype parts cost. Now I can upload my designs and have them made at a reasonable price.  Also, the money I make from sales helps me to pay for new designs and prototypes that I am working on.

Continue reading


 

Shapeways Small Business Spotlight: Corinne Hansen

Posted by in Shop Owner

In honor of Shapeways’ commitment to makers and empowering small business owners, this week we are featuring Shapeways shop owners on the blog discussing how they started, and are growing, their business with Shapeways. In her Sorhain shop, Corinne Hansen designs 3D props, jewelry and more.

What prompted you to open your Shop on Shapeways?

After graduating from college last year, I wanted to put my 3D modeling skills to use right away. I started designing, and opened my shop soon after. Most of my current products are designed to be costume props and accessories. This stems from my love of anime, video games, film and media that I have been passionate about since childhood. I also offer a few artistic jewelry and sculptural designs that I focused on in college. In addition I create original designs based on customer specifications.
How has having a Shop on Shapeways affected your life?
My small business is continuing to grow each month, though right now all earnings go back into my business to purchase 3D prints and fund new products. It is a part time job for me, but maybe one day it will grow to my full time job. In college, I learned to work with metals, ceramics and many other materials. However, to work with these materials, it is important to have safe facilities and equipment. I hope to acquire this space for my small business in the future, so I can expand the products I can offer. It is my plan to continue offering costume accessories but also to further develop my line of jewelry and artistic designs. 

Continue reading


 

The 3D Printing Ebusiness Revolution

Posted by in Shop Owner

by M.G.

From Eleanor: In honor of National Small Business Week we have been featuring stories from Shapeways shop owners. This latest entry comes from MG, a Shapeways Crew member who is an an oil painter and designer who is currently based in Thailand. She sells her artistic life accessories in her Sloris Shapeways shop and on her website

I opened my first business at 19 years old and my most recent 19 years later.  The former focused on corporate design packages and custom printed promotional products and the latter on creating new and unique items.  I love to travel and live abroad and I’ve been residing in Thailand for the last four years.  About a year ago, I realized that the time for a change was approaching.  I opened my Shapeways shop at that point in order to build a business that could easily move with me. After running my Shapeways shop for a year, I thought it would be informative to compare my past business experiences to my current.  Evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of a brick and mortar with that of a virtual business seems like a good place to start.

My first small business experience was right out of college.  With a partner, I began with a shoe string budget, an overabundance of enthusiasm and endless hours of dedication.  Our office and store front was very small, just ourselves, a couple of sales reps, a receptionist and various independent contractors.  The core of our business was servicing other small to medium sized businesses, but we were also lucky enough to land contracts from major corporations such as Sam’s Club, MCI, Land o’ Lakes, etc.  I began with a hope of merging my artistic inclinations and commerce.  I learned owners get paid last, do all the jobs no one else will and are never off the clock.  I finished vowing that I would never run another brick and mortar.  I offer this summary of past experience as a disclosure of my partialities.
The 3D printing community is challenging the traditional small business real world model.  It’s structured on the idea of streamlined print on demand manufacturing, an individualized customer experience and greater environmental responsibility.

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Shapeways Small Business Spotlight: Gabriel Prero

Posted by in Shop Owner

To celebrate National Small Business Week and the creative entrepreneurship of the Shapeways community, we are sharing stories from Shapeways shop owners about their experience making and selling products 3D printed products on Shapeways. Now up, Gabriel Prero, an industrial designer based in Chicago, Illinois, who creates custom cufflinks for his Shapeways shop Cufflink Junkie

What prompted you to open your Shop on Shapeways?

I started making cufflinks for myself, and figured maybe other people would like the ones I made for myself. So I started the shop with 2 pairs. And it’s grown since then.
How has having a Shop on Shapeways affected your life?
No doubt, the extra cash has been nice, but overall it’s given me a new avenue to create and iterate, which is key for me as a designer.

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