Category Archives: Software

Software for Artists Day Sunday November 16th

Shapeways is proud to sponsor Pioneer Works first Software for Artists Day on Sunday November 16th. The day-long event in Red Hook, New York will bring together artists and developers to illustrate the many new software and hardware tools available to contemporary art practice.  It will involve lectures, demonstrations, and conversations which will demystify the most sought-after technology in use today.

Screen Shot 2014-11-13 at 9.34.30 AM

Participants will be able to attend four 45-minute lectures over the course of the day and will also be able to participate in “soapbox sessions” in which they will have 3 minutes to present a project in order to attract interest and/or advice from other artists and technicians.

Shapeways will be on site with some products to show and tips and tricks about using the free software on our site.

Pioneer Works, Red Hook, New York

Sunday November 16th

10am – 7pm

Register here - hope to see you on Sunday!

If you can’t attend, here’s a brief preview of the software available on Shapeways now:

Shapeways API - The Shapeways Upload API enables web and desktop applications to submit 3D models and harness the power of the Shapeways marketplace. You can control pricing, available materials, and add markup to models that are for sale to our community. Read more about the Shapeways API  or join us in our developer forum.

ShapeJS - This tool makes parametric 3D modeling accessible for programmers. If you know Java Script, you can use this tool to generate 3D printable geometry, ias simple as a few lines of code. Read more about the power of ShapeJS here, or jump into the discussion on our developer forum.

Need more inspiration? Check out these amazing 3D creator apps that have been made so far. Got a cool app you’re working on? Tell us about it in the comments!

 


 

Help with 3D Printing directly from Photoshop CC

You may recall back in January, we announced our partnership with Adobe, who enabled 3D printing directly through Photoshop Creative Cloud to Shapeways.

Using this feature, artists, photographers, designers, and other Photoshop users can create and prepare designs for 3D printing.

Adobe has created two custom video tutorials to help you use Photoshop CC for 3D printing:

Designer Paul Trani, Adobe’s Senior Creative Cloud Evangelist, shows you how he made a custom iPhone case directly from Photoshop with a personalized message: “Create Now”!

Custom iPhone case designed by Paul Trani

Custom iPhone case designed by Paul Trani

To get more hands-on, this Photoshop Creative Cloud Tutorial on 3D Printing is a three-part video course that takes you through an entire design-to-print project in Photoshop.

Source: Adobe HelpX

Source: Adobe HelpX

No matter what your level of design experience, we encourage you to check out the tutorials and give it a shot because they’re super informative and easy to follow.


 

Shaping the Future of How We Buy: Introducing Beta & First to Try Products

People are demanding more from the products that they spend their hard earned money on. More and more, they are seeking out products created by people they know and trust, made in the cities and towns they call home. In research we did earlier this year, we found that nearly 50% of Americans know someone who is making and selling their own products. From the friend who quit her day job to create beautiful jewelry to someone who wants to make a better bike helmet, there’s no shortage of innovative products being created by independent designers around the world. In large part, they are enabled by the power of the Internet, which has made it even easier for people to sell their own products over the past 20 years.

Product design is also becoming more collaborative. Entrepreneurs are working with their friends and customers to get the support they need throughout the product development process.

Today, we’re excited to officially announce two big additions to Shapeways that we hope will make it easier (and more fun!) for people to create their own products by inviting friends and fans into the creative process.

Now on Shapeways, you’ll see a two new kinds of products: Beta & First to Try.

What’s Beta?

One of the most critical steps in designing a great product is iteration: tweaking a product to perfection by testing and refining the design. You can be a part of the creative process by giving designers feedback when their products are in Beta. Share your thoughts on the design, the aesthetics, the fit, or anything else you think will help make the product even better. There are already over 500 products in Beta on Shapeways — check them out and start collaborating!

Beta products on Shapeways

What’s First to Try?

If you’re the kind of person who can’t wait to get your hands on the latest gadgets, or if you wait in line for movies on opening night, read on.

In the past, you’d have to wait until a product has gone through months or years of development to try it out. With 3D printing, there’s no need to wait. Help bring a product to life by buying it in “First to Try.” These products are in earlier stages of development, so sometimes there are some kinks (no matter how beautiful the render, the laws of physics still exist. In those cases, not to worry, the refund is on us!). Most of the time, though, they’ve been 3D printed in a few of our materials and it’s your chance to try them out in others. Platinum, anyone?

Here at Shapeways, we’re trying to shake up how products are made and by whom. We have makers and designers from all over the world in our community, some of whom are making their first product and others who have been professional product designers for their whole lives. They’re creating everything from jewelry to rocket ships, GoPro accessories to chess sets. It’s your turn to join them.

Note for all the designers and creators out there!

In the short term, here are a few things you can do to take advantage of these new features:

1. Create Your New Material Renders
For all of the materials that you are offering for sale, you can now create realistic renders of each material. You can pose & generate renders for all of your products, regardless of if they have been printed before. Learn more.

2. Tag Materials in Your Photos
If you have photos for each material you are offering for sale, you can tag them so they show up when shoppers select a material on your product page. Learn more.

3. Explore First to Try & Beta
You can learn more about how you can use these new tools to bring your products to market using 3D printing.

We also shared these features with our community a few weeks ago and got some great feedback, some of which is already implemented in this latest iteration. But it’s not too late to join the discussion! We’re in Beta too :) Sign up for future usability testing here.


 

Project Caterpillar: How we’re resolving rejections at Shapeways

At Shapeways, we have a tradition of giving internal projects an animal name that captures its essence. In this case, the problem we wanted to tackle is a big hairy one with lots of sections and legs, across all our teams — like a caterpillar. The problem is: rejections. Our goal is to dramatically improve how we give you feedback when a product you have ordered cannot be manufactured using 3D printing. Historically, you might have received our standard rejection email that said, “After taking a closer look, we cannot print one of the models in order # …”  You probably spent hours designing, or searching for, that one unique product that is not for sale anywhere else and then we had to tell you to start over! We understand that this could be a very disappointing message. With Project Caterpillar, our aim is to turn design feedback and iteration into a positive experience, and watch our caterpillar eventually go into its chrysalis and emerge as a beautiful butterfly.

It has been half a year since we formed a team to tackle this issue head on. The team consists of community managers, operational directors, software developers, customer service representatives, product managers, and supply chain coordinators. It has been all hands on deck to fight what many of you felt is the worst experience when shopping, selling or making products at Shapeways: getting a rejection.

caterpillar

Caster the Curious Caterpillar Ring by designerica

Why is this such a hairy problem?

At Shapeways we always aim to quickly and affordably turn your ideas from digital designs into real products, but due to the limitations in 3D printing, some designs just can’t be brought to life in their current form. To help clarify how to best design for 3D printing, we provide tools on our website that give you the information you need to make the best possible decisions while designing a product, but it’s not always that simple. Usually we know what will print, but we are also learning with our customers every day — you are pushing the limits of the technology, and we’re right along with you, even if sometimes we have to give you bad news that we can’t produce your product as you’ve built it.

But really, why is this so hard? Here are some of the biggest issues:

  • Well, the first thing was to accept that it is OK to fail. We should take chances, and if that means we try it a few times and we still can’t print your product, that’s OK so long as we give you actionable feedback once we figure it out–and then we can keep learning about what works and what doesn’t.
  • For makers in particular, most of the time we have never seen these products before, and we are not sure what you want! Should that really small propeller actually be attached to the plane? Is it OK if you have a ton of powder stuck inside? We are guessing, and need better ways to understand your intentions and communicate.
  • One of the biggest challenges has been consistency: every model gets checked by hand, and we have dozens of production partners who are looking at thousands of models that have been made 5 minutes or 5 years ago in 40+ materials. This is a lot of people and data to coordinate. So a huge part of our focus was around training our 3D print engineers, and on giving you useful, timely feedback.
  • You might have noticed that we publish guidelines and not rules. That’s partially because we want to continue to allow you to push creative boundaries, and also because creating designs with 3D software that also observe rules of physics can be subjective. For instance, a thin wire will work if the rest of the geometry is structurally sound, but a hard “no thin wire” rule would have eliminated this option. So it’s a lot of art, and less science than we would prefer, especially when the technology improves every day.

 

With this in mind and the goal of turning rejections into resolutions, our teams have been working around the clock to surface potential issues with your models as soon as possible, to provide actionable, consistent feedback when there is an issue, and to make the rejection experience less frustrating for anyone that still receives that disappointing message.

Trust us, we know we’re not quite there yet and we will continue to do everything in our power to accommodate your needs. Still, we wanted to take this opportunity, half a year down the line to reflect on where we came from and where we are now.

Some of the steps we took to reduce rejections

#1 Thin Wall Checking and Fixing.

When we looked into the data for why we had to reject certain designs, it became clear that the biggest issue preventing them from passing our manual checks was in their structural integrity: they had “thin walls” and weren’t strong enough to withstand the whole production process. While a large part of the process your product goes through is just bits and bytes, after a product is taken out of the 3D printer, it is physically touched at least 5 times in cleaning, quality checks, packing, and more. While our printers can produce nearly anything, you can imagine when blasting excess material off your model with high pressured air, your model will need some strength to survive. Soon enough our team decided to surface critical checks of your models on upload; the thin wall checker was one of the first of these tools released on our website. Shortly followed by the thin wall fixer, which in many cases can help solve issues with your models that would have otherwise caused the models to be rejected. We have lots of huge plans for this area, so we can show you the path, right at upload, to producing your model successfully.

See how some of our materials are processed from start to finish in this video playlist:

#2 Print It Anyway.

Another feature many of our most loyal and seasoned community members have been requesting for a long time is the option to go ahead with manufacturing, even if the model doesn’t pass manual checks. Print It Anyway is an option at checkout, that enables you to test your most complicated designs and learn from the actual, physical outcome. Our production crew will always do their very best to ship models in the desired level of quality, and this is no different when selecting Print It Anyway. If a feature on your model cannot make it through the whole production process without slight issues, we would still ship the model to you, so you can hold your model in your own hands, learn from it, and iterate. We learn from your PIAs too!

#3 Detailed Manual Checks.

While all of this work was in progress, our 3D printing engineers have been aiming to provide the complete feedback to slightly adjust your design if it failed thorough manual checks. Instead of surfacing just one issue, they now describe all the issues at once. In practice, this means you would not end up in an endless circle of rejection and updating your model.  If you do experience a rejection, the reasons are also now available on your model edit page as well as in your original email.

#4 Checking Consistency & #5 Print Success Rates.  

We know that the most infuriating thing is to get a rejection of a model that you printed before, and we have paid special attention to fixing that. Indeed we have had a few big hiccups managing these models along the way, but we have improved dramatically, down to < 0.3% of models, and we are still trying to make it better. The consistency of manual checks is continuously monitored and the print success rate of your model is now shown on your model edit page. This way you see the same metrics we look at to judge success through the process.

What’s next?

We’re happy to report that we’ve made some significant progress, reducing by half the number of times we have to tell you that we can’t print your model.  When we do have to give you the bad news, most of the time it’s within 24 hours, and it’s always accompanied by a detailed explanation from a trained 3DP engineer. While we think this improves your experience, we know this is just the tip of the iceberg, especially if you’re someone who still can’t get your product made. We promise that we’re committed to helping you bring amazing products to life, and there are still lots of features and improvements lined up.

This caterpillar is not quite ready to come out of its chrysalis, at least not until we have found a solution that eradicates your frustration and disappointment, but we will continue to listen to your feedback and we will learn from you every day.

Thank you,

Team Caterpillar

caterpillar


 

Introducing Print Success Rates: Increasing Transparency in the 3D Printing Manufacturing Process

Before we launched Shapeways, 3D Printing was used for prototyping and rarely for finished products. As more and more of your phenomenal designs have emerged from our factories, we’ve been able to show the world that 3D Printing can be used to create real, finished products that people want to buy.

With this shift, we’ve started to think more about what it means to make sure a product is ready for repeated manufacturing so that hundreds of customers can hold it in their hands. We want to do everything in our power to help you design great products, so we’ve continued to roll out tools to help you understand our design guidelines.

It’s not surprising that our next biggest request we hear from you, our community, is that you want more information and transparency about how your products fare in our manufacturing process. What goes right, and importantly, what goes wrong. That information is critical to run your business.

Our Manufacturing Process

Although we constantly push our machines and processes to their limits, we can’t make everything. Often times, we can manufacture a product once, but the second, third, and fourth runs aren’t always as successful as the first attempt. For example, we might find that a product prints properly but gets polishing medium stuck inside it, or a model may only survive the cleaning process one in five times due to how brittle the wires are.

The first indicator to determine if we can manufacture a product is whether or not it meets our design guidelines. We only check a product against our design guidelines the first time it is ordered. You can already see the result of our “Manual Check” on your Model Edit page, which was the first update in a series of improvements to increase transparency.

Once your product has cleared Manual Checks, it goes into Production. This process is different for each material, as each material may use different 3D printers and have different post production. If the product experiences a problem along the way (for example: it breaks during the polishing step), the product enters a “QA Review,” where we assess what to do next: attempt to reprint your product, reach out if it looks like you might want the product as is, or give you feedback on how to improve your design for manufacturing.

Today we’ve launched the second change focused on increasing transparency in manufacturing: we are now displaying  Success Rate for each material on your Model Edit page. Each material your model has been ordered in at least once will have a success rate displayed, allowing you to start seeing how it fares during our manufacturing process.

The Success Rate is calculated as follows:

Number of times product shipped successfully / Number of total production attempts

The Success Rate will also include similar materials that share the same processing steps. For example, if your product is printed successfully in Blue Strong & Flexible Polished, this also registers as a successful print for White Strong & Flexible, as the dyed and polished material uses White Strong & Flexible as a base.

When we encounter a design with a low success rate, we pinpoint printability issues and send an e-mail that has a set of suggestions for how to fix your product.

Note: As you can imagine, the success rate may not be incredibly accurate after one attempt, but will increase in accuracy as more products are manufactured.

You can already see the success rate via e-mail when your product experiences issues. Today we’re adding the success rate for each material on your Model Edit page, right next to your automated and manual check results.

Using Success Rate

You can use Success Rate to have a higher level of confidence in your product before making it available for sale. For example, if your product has been printed 10 times successfully with a 100% success rate, there is a very good chance that it will move through the manufacturing process smoothly. If, however, you see a 50% or 55% success rate, you may want to reference any e-mails we’ve sent and then have another look at your design, or reach out to Customer Service in advance to address any issues you (and eventually your customers) might face and adjust accordingly.

The Future

This is the second step in becoming more transparent about how we determine whether or not a product can be repeatedly manufactured. As we continue to learn by printing your models and hear your ideas and suggestions, we will continue to invest in tools that give you better visibility into what’s happening with your product throughout the production process. We hope that this will enable you to make even more innovative products using 3D printing.

We’re excited to share your product’s success rate with you and can’t wait to see what you make next.

-Brad

* Footnote *

Known Issues

While many of our vendors are able to provide us with detailed information on how many times they attempt to print a product before shipping, some can’t. Currently, we don’t have as much visibility into the success rate of the Stainless Steel family as we’d like, so you will see 100% if your model ever shipped successfully, or a 0% if it never did. We are working hard to change this!

 


 

BONUS Designer Spotlight: Scott Camazine and Wall Thickness Fixing

Posted by in Software

During our interview with Scott Camazine, we realized that there was a moment where he tipped his hat to our Wall Thickness Fixing tool. Because this feature is relatively new, we thought this would be a great time to highlight the use of the tool in real context! Scott’s shop started small, but has been able to flourish with his ability to use our tools to help him with problem-areas (for printability) in his models. 

Continue reading


 

3D Print Your Next Masterpiece with Adobe Photoshop & Shapeways

Exciting news! Adobe Photoshop is making it even easier to create and modify designs for 3D printing, particularly in full color.

Adobe’s latest release of Photoshop Creative Cloud lets you create full-color 3D models right in Photoshop. You can design from scratch or refine an existing 3D model while using the Photoshop CC tools you’re already familiar with. Then upload your design to Shapeways and 3D print in over 40 materials

The brand new Photoshop Creative Cloud includes these powerful 3D printing features:

  • Use the standard Photoshop toolbox of brushes, gradients, filters, and bump maps to add color and texture to your existing 3D model then export to 3D print with Shapeways. It has never been easier to add color and effects to 3D models.
  • Create new 3D models from 2D images using extrude, twist and pinch tools while adding texture with bump maps to create truly unique 3D models ready to 3D print.
  • Automated mesh repair and wall thickness repair to ensure your designs are ready to 3D print in all of the materials on Shapeways. Simply insert your 3D file as a 3D layer on Photoshop then choose the Shapeways material in the “3D Print Settings” dialogue box along with the detail and scale, then select “3D Print” and Photoshop will voxelize and repair your file, prepare the print for upload and estimate the cost in your material of choice.

This latest release of Photoshop puts incredibly powerful 3D tools into the hands of everybody running the software. It lowers the barrier of entry and increases the reliability of your designs being ready to 3D print with Shapeways. We’re super excited to see what people create! Adobe is also offering a free one-month trial so you can test the tools for yourself. 


 

123D Design Online Now Even Better for 3D Printing

Posted by in Software

Autodesk has just updated the online version of 123D Design to add even more features that make it perfect for design for 3D printing with Shapeways.

The latest iteration includes tools so that you can fillet and bevel edges, shell a part to help define wall thickness that is critical to ensure your design is 3D printable in the material of your choice.  123D Design also has a design history (not a tree) that means you can go back to a geometry you have created and edit it in a parametric way at any point in the process.  As well as solid modeling from scratch you can also import existing 3D meshes in STL and OBJ format which you can then edit and tweak to then prepare to 3D print.  If you have a 2D vector drawing that you want to bring into the 3rd dimension you can also import SVG files into 123D Design to extrude and edit.

Take a look at this quick video below to see an example of the interface and some of the tools to design for 3D print. 


 

Artificial Intelligence Used to 3D Print Venus of Google (VIDEO)

Posted by in 3D Printed, Art, Software

What does a simple wooden box and a woman wearing a body wrap have in common?  Only Google, a ‘Hill Climbing Algorithm’ and Shapeways 3D Printer can show us.  Venus of Google is an experimental work by artist Matthew Plummer-Fernandez exploring emerging technology and culture.

Venus of Google 3D Print on Shapeways

The Venus of Google was ‘found’ via a Google search-by-image, googling a photograph taken of an object I had been handed over in a game of exquisite corpse. The Google search returned visually similar results, one of these being an image of a woman modeling a body-wrap garment. I then used a similar algorithmic image-comparison technique to drive the automated design of a 3D printable object. The ‘Hill-Climbing’ algorithm starts with a plain box shape and tries thousands of random transformations and comparisons between the shape and the image, eventually mutating towards a form resembling the found image in both shape and colour. I’m interested in this early era of artificial intelligence, computer vision and algorithmic artefacts, exemplifying the paradox of technology being both advanced and primitive at the same time. The Long Tail Multiplier series investigates the potential use of algorithms to create virtually infinite cultural artefacts, inspired by the stories of these algorithmic books and t-shirts.  

The Long Tail Multiplier system is based on a Hill Climbing Algorithm. The 3D Mesh render and distortion is done with Processing and the Hemesh library. The image comparison is managed with a Python script calling a command-line tool called ImageMagick.

The object was 3D printed in full color by Shapeways.


Matthew Plummer-Fernandez
is an artist exploring emerging technology and culture. He uses scanning, digital fabrication and computational approaches to making artefacts, both physical and digital, that blur the distinction between the two, referencing the digitisation of the everyday. Plummer-Fernandez received his MA from the Royal College of Art in 2009, after studies in Graphic Design and a BEng in Computer-Aided Mechanical Engineering at Kings College London. His work has been exhibited and published globally including relevant articles on Creative Applications, Rhizome, and Creators Project, and has received commissions from curators Arts Co, It’s Nice That, and Selfridges. He is currently based in South East London, working in research at Goldsmiths College.


 

Further Proof of Ubiquitous 3D Printing, Windows 8.1 to Include 3D Print Button

Posted by in 3D Printing, Software

The latest developer release of Windows 8.1 includes integrated 3D printing that will make it as easy to 3D print from a 3D modeling application as it is to 2D print a document from Word.

Windows is the first operating system to integrate the option of 3D printing directly within the operating system to allow app developers to also integrate 3D print buttons directly into their apps.  The video below is super dry and suitable for developers of applications more than 3D modelers, designers and makers, but it does lay a trail of where the future of 3D printing is headed, and that is integrated ubiquitously into daily life.

Now let’s see what Apple does to integrate 3D printing into the OSX and iOS ecosystem to enable 3D printing from any and of their devices. 3D scan, model and 3D print integrated into iCloud connecting to your Shapeways account via Facebook that automatically puts a reminder in your iCal when your prints are scheduled to arrive then tracks your UPS shipment in realtime? 

How will Google incorporate 3D printing into the Android, Glass, everything on the internet ecosystem.  Perhaps an ‘upload to Drive to 3D print with Shapeways option’, or a ’3D Scan Command’ in Glass as proven by Todd Blatt but optimized into instant Shapeways upload and 3D print? It is a pity they let go of Google Warehouse.

The future of 3D Printing is everywhere… 


 

3D Scanning with Google Glass to 3D Print

Posted by in Software

3D printing provocateur Todd Blatt may be the first person to 3D scan an object in a public place using Google Glass.

Walking around the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore Todd, simply chose an item, walked around it whilst muttering to himself/Glass and walked away with enough images to convert into a 3D model using 123D Catch.

“I just walked around the work, repeating, “ok glass, take a picture” over and over, 30 shots in total.  No real care in aiming the shot.  I just looked at it and that’s it.  Then I manually uploaded the photos from Google Autobackup to 123D Catch on my computer and proceeded as normal…”

“Since the museum is free, I wandered in, and looked for a good piece to scan.  I’ve scanned over a dozen in the museum so far, mostly at the Artbytes Hackathon, but I somehow missed Marcus Aurelius last time.  It was literally a stroll-by scan job.  I was in and out of the museum in under 10 minutes, and captured a few sculptures.   I just walked around the work, repeating, “ok glass, take a picture” over and over, 30 shots in total.  No real care in aiming the shot.  I just looked at it and that’s it.  Then I manually uploaded the photos from Google Autobackup to 123D Catch on my computer and proceeded as normal with the regular scanning/123d process.”

We already have this capability with our smart phones to create 3D scans but the concept of being able to walk into a room and surreptitiously 3D scan an object just by looking at it may send some galleries into a panic.  Many cultural institutions are already engaging and encouraging people to 3D scan and mash-up their artifacts such as The MET with their 3D print hackathon and the Smithsonian working to 3D digitize some of their artifacts that will help to bring their collection out of the museums and into people’s lives. You can get your 3D print of Todd’s scan now via Shapeways.


 

Introducing MeCube: Easy 3D Modeling for iPhone and iPad

Mecube is an easy (and addictive) app to 3D design and 3D print direct from your iOS device.  The intuitive interface is a simple ‘voxel modeler’ where you add cubes together to make a 3D form like assembling single blocks of Lego together. You can use the same process to cut away or even ‘skew’ cubes for some slightly more complex variations.  Each voxel can be assembled as a solid color or you can go back and paint each surface, by touching a surface multiple times you increase the saturation of the color, this allows for quite a large variation of colors from such a simple interface.

meCube App to 3D print with Shapeways

When your design is complete you can upload your design to Shapeways to be 3D printed in any of our 3D Printing material options including full color.

Keep an eye out for the MeCube Game that will take the same principles into (an even more addictive) puzzle game that will also connect to the Shapeways API to 3D print prizes. 

Check out the tutorial below. 


 

We Bid a Sad Farewell to Tinkercad

[UPDATE: Autodesk Saves Tinkercad from Extinction]

Today we bid a sad farewell to Tinkercad, one of the easiest 3D modeling apps plugging into the Shapeways 3D Printing API.

When Tinkercad launched in early 2011 as a simple browser based, drag and drop interface for 3D modeling, it made it easy for anyone to create a 3D form.  In August 2012 when Tinkercad plugged into the Shapeways 3D Printing API it also became one of the easiest ways for people to learn how to 3D print their own designs which is why we used it to teach everyone from 2nd graders to senior citizens how to design for 3D printing.  With the introduction of the ability to import existing designs Tinkercad also became one of the easiest ways to modify and customize an existing design.

Luckily we are seeing more and more 3D printing apps plugging into the Shapeways 3D Printing API to make it easier for people to access 3D printing but Tinkercad will be missed.

For Tinkercad users they are rolling out the closure in stages:

  • Effective immediately they have closed sign-ups for new users    
  • April 30 2013 – All free accounts will be changed to read only    
  • August 31 2013 – All academic accounts will be changed to read only    
  • December 31 2013 – All paid accounts will be changed to read only    
  • June 31 2014 – Read only access for all users will be discontinued 

This means if you currently have files stored on Tinkercad, you will have until June 31 2014 to download them from their storage and/or upload them to another repository such as Shapeways, Sketchfab or Thingiverse.  If you have unfinished models in Tinkercad you have a limited time to make the modifications to export and/or 3D print them.

There is also an FAQ with additional details.

We wish Kai, Mikko and the Tinkercad team the best of luck as they move away from the
development of the Tinkercad user interface and onto Airstone Labs.


 

Learn to 3D Model to 3D Print with 123D Design in NYC

We are hosting another class to Design for 3D Print with 123D Design and Shapeways.

This beginners class is an intro to 3D modeling with Autodesk 123D Design and 3D Printing with Shapeways.  

We will work step by step through some of the basic tools used to 3D model, how to construct basic forms using sketches, solid modelling, and basic patterns.  We will then upload our designs to Shapeways to get a taste of how to export your 3D model to 3D print.  

You do not need to have any experience with 3D printing or 3D modeling to participate in this class.  Bring your Mac or PC laptop your charger, and an external mouse and create an account on Shapeways prior to the event and download 123D Design we will be using in the class..  If you are interested in a broader overview of the materials, processes and some 3D printed case studies, take a look at the intro to design for 3D printing. 

Thu, Mar 28th, 2013 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm EDT at Shapeways HQ in NYC 

Sign up via Skillshare


 

Weekend Contest #5: 3D Scan to 3D Print with 123D Catch

This week for our weekend contest we challenge you to 3D Scan to 3D Print using Autodesk 123D Catch.

Take up to 40 photographs around an object with your iPhone, iPad or your camera and 123D Catch will take the photos and stitch them together in the cloud using photogrammetry to create a 3D object.  You may need to give the 3D file a little love to make it ready to 3D print then upload the file to Shapeways with the tag ‘123D Catch‘ and we will give our favorite entry a $25 Shapeways Gift Card.