The Shapeways Blog: 3D Printing News & Innovation

Shapeways Blog


Ask an Engineer re-do with Scan and Solve for Rhino


Comments

Display comments as (Linear | Threaded)

Wouldn't a full can weight more than 355g? Some aluminum, some water, some air, some additives.
#1 stannum on 2013-03-02 17:49 (Reply)
I think that you are correct. If I actually drank soda, I would know that it is 12oz and not 8oz :-(
We should have checked the mass of the can more carefully, e.g see this post http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/121Adensitycoke.html
So thanks for catching this!

This will affect the numerical values in all the tests, but not the outcomes or the conclusions in the video. The stresses and displacements will increase in proportion to the applied load. The high stresses will be in the same locations, and the shape of the deformations will remain the same. This is what "linear elasticity" means.
#2 Vadim (Homepage) on 2013-03-04 01:22 (Reply)
A reference like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beverage_can and no need to drink anything.

The video says the material approaches the limits, but still stays below them. That was the give away, specially after first theory was discarded as it didn't match at all. Second one matches in place but still not in outcome. With the correct value it would mark some zones red and, if the software supports it, simulate the breaking. But imagine if the mass was correct, the video says it should not break.
#3 stannum on 2013-03-04 03:25 (Reply)
Indeed. The correct mass is roughly 1.5 times more, so the computed stresses and displacements would be 1.5 more. Thus the danger level of 0.86 becomes 1.29, and you would see the the red at all points where the values exceeds 1. I posted an image of the solution with 3.375N applied at the link below. (It is still not exactly what the weight should be, but is much closer.)

http://www.scan-and-solve.com/photo/3d-printed-model-under-45-degree-load
#4 Vadim (Homepage) on 2013-03-04 04:01 (Reply)

Add Comment



Enclosing asterisks marks text as bold (*word*), underscore are made via _word_.
Standard emoticons like :-) and ;-) are converted to images.

To prevent automated Bots from commentspamming, please enter the string you see in the image below in the appropriate input box. Your comment will only be submitted if the strings match. Please ensure that your browser supports and accepts cookies, or your comment cannot be verified correctly.
CAPTCHA

  
  
The Shapeways Blog: 3D Printing News & Innovation

Learn More »