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Forget Hours of Tiresome Assembly, Simply 3D Print a Ship in a Bottle


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"What would YOU do if you could 3D print in a clear material such as this?"

Stuff like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvuXKS6i4iw
#1 GWMT on 2012-11-21 22:12 (Reply)
Nothing on any level of cuteness, but just being able to print opaque polyhedra encapsulated within clear ones, or ball-and-stick type thingies embedded in a semi-amorphous transparent
"cloud" would be quite useful.
#2 mkroeker on 2012-11-21 23:13 (Reply)
How about WINDOWS in buildings and automobiles?
#3 Stony Smith (Homepage) on 2012-11-22 01:51 (Reply)
Oooooohhh, nice
#4 Duann on 2012-11-22 01:57 (Reply)
Things inside of things inside of things...
#5 Duann on 2012-11-22 01:57 (Reply)
OR buildings and windows at the same time????

Would you like multiple material..??
#6 Duann on 2012-11-22 01:58 (Reply)
Come on, this is just torture. Is sinter-klaas on your team or not ?
#7 mkroeker on 2012-11-22 07:13 (Reply)
What a strange question... of course we want multi-material! :-)

Something I'm very interested in with Objet multi-material is the ability to print soft rubber-like material and rigid parts in one go - imagine the robots you could design, that have built-in flex-joints, suspension elements, and pneumatic actuators. Something like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DsbS9cMOAE
but with rigid parts. Or like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKJybDb1dz0&feature=related

I could think of a lot of applications for optically clear material - internal light guides for LED designer lamps (I think Disney research is looking into this right now), or for enclosures (usually the LED is somewhere on the PCB inside, and a lot of products use clear light guides to get it to the outside of the case).

Lastly, you don't seem to have a robust plastic that is watertight at the moment. ABS in FDM print would do that, and I guess some of the Objet materials too (to make waterproof enclosures).
So, as long as it is commercially feasible for you, bring it on :-) There are never enough materials (at least for some of us...) :-) Laser sintered metal (or better, laser melted metal) at a more affordable price would also be awesome...
#8 felix on 2012-11-22 09:28 (Reply)
Yes, yes, very much yes!
#9 ChrisC (Homepage) on 2012-11-22 16:50 (Reply)
All very nice... and, yes, we want multi-material! ... Right now I feel as though I'm re-living the Personal Computer explosion of the 70's!
#10 Glenn (Homepage) on 2012-11-22 16:57 (Reply)
Id definitely be interested.... Heres a different example of what the Connex series can produce.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjEXym3s8uw&feature=relmfu

Id imagine you'd have to limit the amount of digital materials you could offer. Considering some of them can mimic 100+ types. That might be a bit confusing in the materials list ;-)
#11 Piers (Homepage) on 2012-11-22 19:56 (Reply)
Oops 17 materials can be printed pure or blended 'on the fly' into an additional 90 digital materials
#12 Piers (Homepage) on 2012-11-22 20:10 (Reply)
Yes, the ability of the Objet to combine rigid and flexible parts is VERY interesting..

Would you prefer clear over rubber type materials?
#13 Anonymous on 2012-11-23 22:26 (Reply)
I'd imagine the blending would make for some difficult choices for newcomers, but specifying known blends for a good material would be nice.
I know I have a few models set aside that can only be printed properly using this type of printer; for example a Metroid that requires a clear membrane surrounding internal biological structures.
#14 Bry on 2012-11-27 22:29 (Reply)

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